Author Topic: Cruise control  (Read 7365 times)

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Offline Egodriver71

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #25 on: June 12, 2013, 10:51:33 am »
And C14s are not touring bikes.

Then why are they listed under the Supersport 'Touring' category on the Kawasaki website?  :pokestick:
Thomas Mann
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1930 Indian 101 Scout (the first bike)(still in the garage)
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Offline JW

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #26 on: June 12, 2013, 11:01:46 am »
And C14s are not touring bikes.

Then why are they listed under the Supersport 'Touring' category on the Kawasaki website?  :pokestick:

Exactly!!!!!!

Offline Roger M.

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #27 on: June 12, 2013, 11:51:33 am »
IMHO, I think it's the best touring bike!!! :)


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Offline Mad River Marc

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #28 on: June 12, 2013, 11:54:41 am »
The 14 is classified as a sport touring bike (regardless of what the marketing materials say), this class is designed to be a combination of sporty and comfortable,  in this class, some bikes lean more towards one word or the other.

Some are more touring oriented then sport oriented (The ST1300 for example),  these bikes handle well but they are designed to be more suited for long distance and it takes some mods to really bring out the sport in them.

The 14  leans towards the sport end of "Sport touring"  out of the box they can really carve up the twisties and go fast, but while it is ok for touring out of the box depending on your build/endurance etc, it needs some mods to make it really a great tourer.   and frankly these mods are all subjective anyway (what works for one person may not be right for another) so I do like this aspect of the bike

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Offline Egodriver71

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #29 on: June 12, 2013, 01:24:25 pm »
I was teasing!!!  :nananana:


I know the C14 is way more SPORT than most of the sport touring bikes, other than things like the ZZR1200, Motus, ST4, etc. that still retain the chain final drive.

It's also way more sport oriented than the C10 it replaced.



Back to the CC debate.  It would have been nice to incorporate CC, but at the time the C14 was being developed, much less released, name me ANY sport touring bike that came with factory CC?

At the time having ABS was the most given thing that Kawasaki needed to make sure was in the mix.

Until it goes the way of fly by wire throttle, I doubt you'll ever see factory CC on the C14.  It costs too much $$$.  With fly by wire, you add a control pad and software code.  At this point hardware needs to be added and that adds a lot more to the bottom line.

I just think it's amazing they did such a major redesign only two years into production.  :great:
Thomas Mann
Jacksonville, FL

COG #8321

1930 Indian 101 Scout (the first bike)(still in the garage)
1986 Yamaha Radian (the first modern bike)(Sold)
1996 Kawasaki Vulcan 500LTD (the wife's first bike)
1996 Kawasaki Eliminator (Wife's)
1999 Kawasaki Concours (The Warbird)
2006 Kawasaki Vuclan 900 (Wife's)
2009 Kawasaki Concours 14 (Totaled)
2009 Kawasaki Concours 14 (Second Chance)

Offline Cms

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2013, 08:00:16 pm »
Guys,
Can we get a summary of what each cost and ball park figure if we had someone install each?
I'm very interested in this. I would like electronic if it does not brake the bank. I have a throttle lock coming for my V-Strom that I will be trying out next week.

Offline Gypsy JR

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #31 on: June 14, 2013, 04:19:50 am »
Ride by wire would be nice. The BMW has it. Even the mighty Electra Glide line now has it, or at least the Ultra I almost bought 2 years ago did.

By the way, the Electra Glide is a touring bike, in case you didn't know.  :rotflmao: :motonoises:
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Offline Egodriver71

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #32 on: June 14, 2013, 10:41:34 am »
By the way, the Electra Glide is a touring bike, in case you didn't know.  :rotflmao: :motonoises:


Is it because it's listed under the 'touring' category on their website?  :pokestick:
Thomas Mann
Jacksonville, FL

COG #8321

1930 Indian 101 Scout (the first bike)(still in the garage)
1986 Yamaha Radian (the first modern bike)(Sold)
1996 Kawasaki Vulcan 500LTD (the wife's first bike)
1996 Kawasaki Eliminator (Wife's)
1999 Kawasaki Concours (The Warbird)
2006 Kawasaki Vuclan 900 (Wife's)
2009 Kawasaki Concours 14 (Totaled)
2009 Kawasaki Concours 14 (Second Chance)

Offline C14lvr

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #33 on: September 27, 2013, 12:12:17 am »
Hey guys, thought I'd chime in here...

I've installed 5 Rostras on bikes now, including my own 2011 C14.
I did mine, by myself, on my porch, in 10 hrs. The C14's a piece of cake.
This was my second C14 to install on.

Others were 2 BMW 1200GS's, and 1 BMW R1150RT.
The GS's weren't bad, they have a VSS wire and sensor, right up top under the tank by the cpu.
Tough part on the GS was trying to find a place to mount it that would hide it, yet work on such a naked bike. Another tough thing about all Boxer twins, the Bohdan box and twin throttle bodies/cables... But we found the solution, thanks to the new BMW's coming now with factory cruise. We buy the new style box, and it's a snap.

The RT was tougher. No VSS. Had to buy the aftermarket p/u coil, and specially sized neodynium magnets that were placed in the bolt heads of the front rotor... Took a while to think that one up, but works like a charm.

Average cost for the Rostra kit from Murph's, (which he upgraded the switch for me to the one with the engaged light) was around $300. Add'l parts... Switch mounting bracket, and second relay, (required for the engage light.) Also, the switches are not waterproof, and come with a crummy rubber cover.
Ditch the rubber cover, pop the plastic cover off the switch, and silicone everything, including where the wiring comes out the back. Reinstall the cover. Wala... Waterproof switch.

Before I added the Rostra, I had installed a Throttlemeister. Very nice, but $125? Not that nice.
And, as someone said, if you ride with others, you constantly have to readjust the throttle to keep the pace. I hated that. Especially on a 4000 mile trip with 6 other bikes on I-40...

The Rostra works beautifully.

I read somewhere here others have had issues with diagnostics upon completion, and couldn't get the lights to work. My experience has been 5/5 worked every time correctly.

There are dip switch settings, and I've learned about what they control, and how it makes the system perform overall.

The C14 is by far the easiest to install this system on.

If not for possible liability issues, I'd consider doing 5 of these per week for a living.

Now, for the record, I am a veteran licensed electrician, and also hold ASE Master certification, so that helps.... Lol.

But, this system works well on these bikes.
Best $300 I've spent on it.
Sure beats the $350 I wasted on my Ebay Sargent Low Version seat... (that was supposed to be a standard...)

My 2 cents worth....
Bob



« Last Edit: September 27, 2013, 12:25:11 am by C14lvr »
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Offline Gypsy JR

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #34 on: September 27, 2013, 08:44:26 am »
I actually like the urethane cover Murph sells for the switch. It certainly waterproofs the switch nicely.
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Offline fartymarty

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #35 on: October 04, 2013, 09:38:12 pm »
Also, the switches are not waterproof, and come with a crummy rubber cover.
Ditch the rubber cover, pop the plastic cover off the switch, and silicone everything, including where the wiring comes out the back. Reinstall the cover. Wala... Waterproof switch.

I actually like the urethane cover Murph sells for the switch. It certainly waterproofs the switch nicely.

I think the cover is just OK, it works, but it is uGly with a capital G. I'd sure like to see some
pictures of the inside of that switch all silicon-ed up if anybody has some. I didn't try that because I thought
it would mess up the switch operation. I guess I need to pop mine open for a look see.
My Murph's switch cover didn't survive the hail storm I went through in Wyoming on the way to the national,
and I now just have a baggie over it. I actually think it looks a lot better with the baggie than with the cover.  :o

Offline BDF

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Re: Cruise control
« Reply #36 on: October 04, 2013, 10:17:34 pm »
Actually, the cover fails in exactly the place were we need it most- in the back where the wires enter the switch.

I have been through three (3) Rostra switches now on my C-14 and the first two failed for the same reason; corrosion due to moisture ingress (it got wet in dare). Both were "well sealed" (read: slopped as much as humanly possible) with silicone sealant all around the wires as well as over the front of the first one. The second one was wearing sealant and the Murph's thingy.

So I sat down and thought about and decided to go a different way that has worked since the second switch failed- maybe three or four years ago now. I took the switch apart and liberally coated (read: slathered) it with axle grease. Not even the superb grades of silicone based dielectric greases I have and use, just plain ole' Castrol axle grease in an old and filthy tub. I then put it together to make sure the silicone resistance switches still worked when they forced their way through the grease (they did / do) and put it on the bike. It has been through thousands of miles of rain, the occasional snow, lots 'o sunshine and a fair amount of condensation. Still works, still has grease in it, still does not leak any grease (which is why I did not use dielectric grease in the first place) and is starting to fade from UV exposure. So that is what I would suggest- take the P.C. board out of the switch, remove the push buttons and slather the board liberally with thick, heavy grease. Especially slather up the bundle of wires where they contact the board and tie together to form a bundle- this is the way most of the water enters in the first place.

Now as far as Marty going on about how ugly that cover is.... I really don't think it is quite as good looking as he is making it out to be. :-(

Brian

I think the cover is just OK, it works, but it is uGly with a capital G. I'd sure like to see some
pictures of the inside of that switch all silicon-ed up if anybody has some. I didn't try that because I thought
it would mess up the switch operation. I guess I need to pop mine open for a look see.
My Murph's switch cover didn't survive the hail storm I went through in Wyoming on the way to the national,
and I now just have a baggie over it. I actually think it looks a lot better with the baggie than with the cover.  :o
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