Author Topic: Engine Guard Deception  (Read 10127 times)

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Offline Gypsy JR

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Re: Engine Guard Deception
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2012, 11:15:20 am »
A question comes to me on this topic.  If you have the MC Canyon Cages on your bike, would you need any sort of "sliders" like ZG and others have installed with other brands of tip-over protection?  The Canyon Cages look like they would eliminate the need for the sliders on the axles and on the shaft.

Thanks for any specifics that can be provided.

If you have Canyon Cages on your bike, it would be redundant, and a huge expense unnecessarily, to put Top Block body sliders on. If you add the MCE small rear bag guard bars, you don't need anything else, the bike is not touching the ground if you drop it in a parking lot or in a relatively slow low side (as posted with pictures by a member elsewhere).

MCE's new guard bars for the C14 are great protection and I personally think they look great.
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Offline Necron99

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Re: Engine Guard Deception
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2012, 11:23:27 am »
I have wondered if front axle pucks would be potentially helpful to augment the canyon cages.

Offline Conrad

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Re: Engine Guard Deception
« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2012, 11:26:51 am »
Going by the pics here, I could live w/ those.  In over 40 years of riding, only once have I gone down...doing about 15 mph, and a young deer jumped out, hitting my front wheel, and knocking me over...year was 1978, and I had my new Honda 750F for less than a month, w/ new case savers on.  So...I guess it is time to protect this bike in any way I can.  One question re: the Canyon Cages...are they solid, or hollow core tubing?

Hollow.
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Offline Conrad

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Re: Engine Guard Deception
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2012, 11:28:22 am »
A question comes to me on this topic.  If you have the MC Canyon Cages on your bike, would you need any sort of "sliders" like ZG and others have installed with other brands of tip-over protection?  The Canyon Cages look like they would eliminate the need for the sliders on the axles and on the shaft.

Thanks for any specifics that can be provided.

If you have Canyon Cages on your bike, it would be redundant, and a huge expense unnecessarily, to put Top Block body sliders on. If you add the MCE small rear bag guard bars, you don't need anything else, the bike is not touching the ground if you drop it in a parking lot or in a relatively slow low side (as posted with pictures by a member elsewhere).

MCE's new guard bars for the C14 are great protection and I personally think they look great.

I'm pretty sure that he was talking about axel and drive shaft sliders, not the Top Blocks.
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Offline DanL

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Re: Engine Guard Deception
« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2012, 11:53:50 am »
I can attest from personal experience that 1: the canyon cage will not touch down before the pegs and 2: they fully protected my bike on a low speed drop.

I was making a u-turn on a sloped, uphill road and the bike decided it wanted to be on the ground. This is all the damage I incurred- it would have been much worse without the CC's on there.
front:


rear:

Offline MCEnterprises

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Re: Engine Guard Deception
« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2012, 02:28:42 pm »
Thank you guys for all of the replies and positive feedback! It sucks when peoples bikes go down but it's nice to have the first hand experiences of how well the guards works. To answer a few of the questions that came up:

The guards are made of hollow, .120 steel. In the past we've made all our bars with .083 steel which is slightly thinner but has held up just as well. When designing these guards though, we figured we'd make them slightly beefier and went with the .120 instead of the tried and true .083. So far we've had stunning results. The slight gain in weight (we're talking like a pound or two at the very most) is well worth the added strength of the bars. Using solid tubing would simply be overkill (at least if it was solid tubing that's the same O.D. as the material we use now). If one were to use solid tubing, you could get away with using smaller diameter tubing but then the guards come out looking a tad goofy on such a big bike.

Regarding the sliders, we actually recommend people DON'T use sliders if they're already using our guards. Sliders, when used anywhere but the track, actually cause more harm than good. Firstly, though, you have to understand how sliders are supposed to work. When a bike goes down with sliders, the sliders are meant to allow the bike to literally slide on the ground. However, this isn't how they generally perform on normal road asphalt due to the inconsistencies of the road (bumps, gravel, cracks, etc.). Generally, on asphalt, the sharper edges of the sliders can actually catch the ground and cause the bike to flip and/or roll which isn't good. Our bars, with the smooth rounded edges, allow the bike to slide much easier on rough asphalt. Sliders are good, but only for track use as that's what they were originally designed for. On top of that, when a bike goes down onto a slider, all the force is on that single point. With our cages, the force of the drop is spread out over numerous mounting points which speads the force over a larger area thus reducing the force each point has to take making the guard stronger as a whole. Also, it's worth it to note that you do need the Canyon Cage AND the Saddle Bag Guards to protect the entire bike (if that's what you're looking to do, anyway). Unfortunately, because the bike is so big, it can't be protected with just the front guard or just the rear guard. However, both guards used in accordance with one another offer some of the best protection on the market for these bikes at a very fair cost.

If I missed anything please let me know and I'll be sure to answer your question as quickly as I can!

Offline nando

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Re: Engine Guard Deception
« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2012, 02:33:09 pm »
Word up!
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Offline Madman

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Re: Engine Guard Deception
« Reply #32 on: December 05, 2012, 01:14:04 am »
I have the R&G Bars as well. I like the way they look and I think I will remain a 'chicken strip' supporter.  ;)  I have been on it mind you but I always feel more comfortable on the left side but did not scrape the bar.
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