Author Topic: On- the- bike TPS sensor change  (Read 16057 times)

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2014, 06:03:03 pm »
If Cogdom gives out Atta-Boys or Gold Stars, Brian gets one for finding the way forward servicing the TPS.  I know I was asking questions about removing the TPS by cutting an access hole in the tire before taking it to a dealer for a new tire.  This is easier and the service-anytime method is now proven.  Bravo :clap:
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Offline BDF

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2014, 06:32:04 pm »
Thanks for the kind words. Frankly, it always bothered me that the sensor is inside the wheel in the first place but seeing as it IS there, I thought there should be a way to get at it for all those people without a tire machine. I just think the 'deck is stacked' against a big percentage of C-14 owners who do not mount their own tires.

The hole in the sidewall is also a great idea and easy enough for anyone to do IMO. Also cheaper than the clamp method 'cause no clamps are needed. The only downside of course is that the tire must be changed once it is cut (or the world's biggest tire patches found). My tires are not even 1/2 worn and at least one sensor is complaining so I will be using the clamp method on my own bike in the next week or so and of course will continue to use the tires already on the bike.

And now I can turn my attention and annoyance to the issue of a motorcycle GPS that is waterproof, is sunlight readable, has an MP3 player, Bluetooth and an audio out ability (with an audio jack) and does NOT cost more than my high resolution, 46" flat panel TV did. Grrrrrrrrrrrr.

Brian

If Cogdom gives out Atta-Boys or Gold Stars, Brian gets one for finding the way forward servicing the TPS.  I know I was asking questions about removing the TPS by cutting an access hole in the tire before taking it to a dealer for a new tire.  This is easier and the service-anytime method is now proven.  Bravo :clap:
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Offline Roger M.

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2014, 06:35:39 pm »
Seeing Brian preform this service in person at tech day, I can really appreciate the simplicity this option offers.  :beerchug:


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Offline Rev Ryder

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #28 on: April 28, 2014, 07:05:21 pm »
Attaboy Jed... clamp it!
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Offline gPink

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #29 on: April 28, 2014, 07:07:36 pm »
<groan>

Offline chamberlincalls

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #30 on: April 28, 2014, 08:36:27 pm »

And now I can turn my attention and annoyance to the issue of a motorcycle GPS that is waterproof, is sunlight readable, has an MP3 player, Bluetooth and an audio out ability (with an audio jack) and does NOT cost more than my high resolution, 46" flat panel TV did. Grrrrrrrrrrrr.


Looking forward to your next research project!

Offline Junior

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #31 on: April 29, 2014, 02:07:33 am »
What a great idea, I can surely do this in my shop but either way the elk hoof makes it all the more doable, I think I might have one of those around too!

Brian

Offline Lablank

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2014, 04:40:36 pm »
Here's another approach to changing the TPS sensor batteries with the wheels on the bike!!!  :-\

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Offline gPink

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2014, 05:36:39 pm »
You going to be able to patch that?

Offline fartymarty

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #34 on: May 26, 2014, 06:59:15 pm »

Attaboy Jed... clamp it!

<groan>

Funny how the groan made the pun even funnier.  :D

However, giving Brian a new humorous nickname (Jed) before he shaves you....priceless brave foolhardy  displays your faith.  :great:

Offline Lablank

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #35 on: May 26, 2014, 08:01:53 pm »
You going to be able to patch that?

Easy! Here's how I did it!  :))

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Offline ZG

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2014, 10:06:36 pm »
Here's another approach to changing the TPS sensor batteries with the wheels on the bike!!!  :-\

 :D :great: :beerchug:


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Offline Rev Ryder

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2014, 10:46:12 pm »

Attaboy Jed... clamp it!

<groan>

Funny how the groan made the pun even funnier.  :D

However, giving Brian a new humorous nickname (Jed) before he shaves you....priceless brave foolhardy  displays your faith.  :great:
The first three were more likely closer to correct.   :beerchug:
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Offline Dalroo

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #38 on: July 18, 2014, 01:54:26 pm »
Sorry if this has been answered, but since this thread was revived to address another, I wanted to ask.

I am starting to get the low battery message for my front sensor, and I do have the extended warranty, so can get this done at the shop, but don't want to get stuck with the new "potted" replacement. As an alternative, has anyone gotten the new style sensor, and been allowed to keep the Original?

If they will give them back, it would solve a lot of logistical problems for the next time.
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Offline BDF

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #39 on: July 18, 2014, 02:06:39 pm »
Of course I cannot and will not try to speak for everyone but I doubt anyone has gotten the old sensors after a warranty replacement. By all means, ask your dealer if that can be done though as there is absolutely nothing to lose.

Sooner or later someone will come up with a way to change the batteries on the new potted sensors too. But even given a sound method, that will be a much more difficult, time consuming and risky thing to do as compared with the older sensors because digging through hardened epoxy is tedious at best, and destroys components (like the wires you need) at worst.

Brian

Sorry if this has been answered, but since this thread was revived to address another, I wanted to ask.

I am starting to get the low battery message for my front sensor, and I do have the extended warranty, so can get this done at the shop, but don't want to get stuck with the new "potted" replacement. As an alternative, has anyone gotten the new style sensor, and been allowed to keep the Original?

If they will give them back, it would solve a lot of logistical problems for the next time.
KiPass keeping you up at night? Has the low fuel warning burned your retinas? Find peace, harmony and the answer to these problems. www.incontrolne.com

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #40 on: March 22, 2015, 10:18:54 am »
This thread just plain delivers.  After 3 1/2 years I was routinely seeing the rear the low battery TPMS alarm which we know cases the dash to go ape shI$t during the first 20 minutes of the ride. I was planning on replacing the battery on the next tire change, but that is at least 2000 miles in the future. I followed the instructions in this thread and sure enough breaking the tire bead with the clamps and replacing the battery works as advertised.

I'm not sure if Brian checks in on the COG forum anymore, but job well done.   :great:
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Offline Gypsy JR

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #41 on: March 22, 2015, 11:45:04 am »
This is one of the most useful threads here in a long time. I really don't want to give up my 90 degree valve stems, so that means keeping the "old" style TPMS units and replacing batteries. Now I know how to do it without taking the wheel off, and it saves a lot of time.

I don't know if this could be purposed to this, it certainly is of the same ilk: http://www.bestrestproducts.com/c-98-beadbrakr-tcm.aspx
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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #42 on: March 23, 2015, 05:26:27 pm »
I've now changed the batteries in at least 50 TPMS sensors with excellent success. Just did two more today. Let me know if I can help.
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Offline MCP

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #43 on: March 30, 2016, 07:43:17 pm »
Question on a valve stem?

My valve stem is leaking air following me filling it the other day. Searching here, I found this thread which describes how to replace the sensor without removing the wheel.

I have a hitch on my 2012 and it its a pain in the #$% to deal with to get the wheel off. Would this (clamps etc) work to replace a valve stem too?

Great write up with pictures BTW - thanks




I tried the video thingy and it just did not work out. So I went through the process and took a bunch of photos: think of this is a photo essay :-) 

First of all, I used these 12" long clamps. They come with a plastic jaw protector that I found got in the way and made the clamp slippery- they worked much better with the jaw covers removed.


Remove the valve stem and turn the wheel so the stem is facing down (more or less)- then put the first clamp on the back of the tire so that the moving jaw just touches the rim on the way by and put a little pressure on it:


In this position, the far jaw will firmly catch the wheel edge:


Put the second clamp about 3" or 4" away from the first clamp and put some pressure on that one too.


Alternate between the clamps moving the bead in until it is broken from the wheel:


Slip a block of wood in-between the wheel rim and the tire, between the clamps. I used a piece of 2X4:


Remove both clamps:


Rotate the tire about 70 or 75 degrees AWAY from the valve stem and again use the two clamps about 4" apart to squeeze the tire and place another block of wood between the tire and wheel- this time will be much easier because the bead has already been broken. Continue to do this until only the area immediately around the valve stem is left with the tire bead seated on the rim:


At this point, put both clamps on the tire again, about 5" apart and centered around the sensor and begin to squeeze the tire down but do NOT move the tire all the way to the center of the wheel because it will catch and break the sensor- this is the first part of this process that takes some care and fiddling. The sensor cannot be seen in this photo but it is immediately behind the tire bead; it is easy to tell where the sensor is because it is mounted to the valve stem:


With the tire held up near but not against the sensor, reach in with a tire iron or long, flat blade screwdriver and gently move the tire away from the wheel as you continue to squeeze just one clamp. The tire bead will slide over the sensor. It may and probably will drag on the sensor so be careful to go slowly here and not let anything bang or move suddenly. Once one edge of the tire bead is over the sensor, move the tire iron to the tire at the other end of the sensor and then squeeze the opposite clamp so that the entire tire bead is over the sensor:


Once the bead is over the sensor, carefully squeeze both clamps, a bit at at time, and watch the tire slide over the sensor body until it is on the other side. Again, go easy here because the sensor is plastic and if the tire catches it and lots of pressure is used on the clamps, it will break. Finally, the entire bead will be on the far side of the sensor and the sensor itself can be removed using a hex wrench:


Once the new battery is in the sensor and the sensor reinstalled in the wheel, again use a tire iron to help get the tire bead over and past the sensor as the clamps are released a little bit at a time. Once the entire sensor is 'behind' the tire bead, release the clamps, remove all wood blocks, check to make sure the wheel and tire bead are clean (clean them if needed), apply a bit of rubber lube to the entire bead and inflate the tire to again seat the bead. Then install the valve stem and inflate the tire to the final pressure.

The rear sensor can be tested by putting the bike on the centerstand, starting the bike and running the rear wheel up to ~20 MPH (any gear although 4th or 5th is quieter and less jerky on the centerstand) for about a minute. Before doing this, put the bike's LCD readout on the tire pressure screen and once the rear TPS has turned on, a reading will show on the screen if the battery replacement worked.

There is no easy way to test the front sensor without riding the bike that I know of. There are several difficult ways but the most fun ones would involve an electric drill and a large sanding drum to spin the front tire up.  ;D

Brian

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #44 on: March 30, 2016, 07:51:27 pm »
MCP, you didn't mention front or rear. I followed this procedure to replace a TPMS battery on my rear wheel.  It works as advertised.   I assume the front will work just as well, but have nothing to offer on that.
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Offline Zarticus

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #45 on: March 30, 2016, 08:31:38 pm »
MCP, you didn't mention front or rear. I followed this procedure to replace a TPMS battery on my rear wheel.  It works as advertised.   I assume the front will work just as well, but have nothing to offer on that.
You can tell by his pictures that it's a rear tire  :beerchug:
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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #46 on: March 30, 2016, 09:51:22 pm »
But that's not his bike right or photos right?  He wants to know if it can be done to fix a valve stem. Didn't say which one.
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Offline MCP

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #47 on: March 30, 2016, 10:27:17 pm »
Not my bike in the pictures guys, I was just asking if this procedure would allow me to replace a valve stem,

and its the rear tire I'm dealing with.

I don't know anything about valve stems, or how to change them even if the tire was off the bike, so, basically don't know what I'm doing.

Looking for experience here :great:

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #48 on: March 31, 2016, 12:14:52 pm »
Is it the valve stem core that is leaking? The easiest fix with a core removal tool and a new valve core.

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Re: On- the- bike TPS sensor change
« Reply #49 on: March 31, 2016, 12:22:58 pm »
Is it the valve stem core that is leaking? The easiest fix with a core removal tool and a new valve core.

Correct... and it may be that the core is just a hair loose.

Checking the core would be my first step if I heard air leaking from the valve with no signs of valve damage.



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