Author Topic: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass  (Read 1155 times)

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Offline Rob9876

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Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« on: August 30, 2017, 12:55:38 am »
Due to my forgetting to turn the switch off after stopping the engine, my battery is completely dead.  I'm new to the bike and KiPass -- what do I need to do to KiPass to be able to push start the bike?

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2017, 01:01:07 am »
Unless you have the headsup display come up, there is no volts... it takes volts to run the electric fuel pump.... so.... better put it on charger, because bump starting ain't gonna happen.... just bringing you up to speed on that idea.


30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline Deepsea

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2017, 01:02:53 am »
Charge the battery. Kipass requires 12 volts (not sure if thats exact) just to activate. You can not bump start a C14 with a dead battery. Sorry, that's just how it is.
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Offline Rob9876

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2017, 01:03:37 am »
Unless you have the headsup display come up, there is no volts... it takes volts to run the electric fuel pump.... so.... better put it on charger, because bump starting ain't gonna happen.... just bringing you up to speed on that idea.
Not the answer I was hoping for, but the answer I needed to know -- thanks for the quick reply!

Offline Rob9876

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2017, 02:30:24 am »
Thanks again for the replies.  Glad I had AAA motorcycle coverage with towing -- though that was quite an experience balancing the bike up a metal ramp that had oil leaked on it earlier tonight.

Edit: on the phone they said they would not jump start a bike, then when I got home the guy told me they jump start bikes all the time.   :??:

So, any thoughts on how long I should ride the bike after I get it jump started?  Just until the volt display goes back to 13 or so?

Offline Deepsea

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2017, 02:44:17 am »
Give it more time than that. If it was me I'd ride for at least 30-45 minutes, probably more like 60-90. Depends on how "Dead" the battery was.
BSA Gold Star, Norton Commando, Moto Guzzi V-7 Sport, Norton Commando, John Player Norton, BMW R90S, Kawasaki Z-1 and Z-1R , Honda CB-650, C-14
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Offline Bud

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2017, 09:20:40 am »
Pull the battery and charge it properly on a charger.  While you have the battery out you can abrasively clean the connections on the cables and posts on the battery.  While you're at it abrasively clean the ground connections at the frame as iffy grounds seem to cause lots of little problems.  Shortcuts can lead to future disappointments.

Offline jwh20

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2017, 11:22:32 am »
Also be aware that it's not uncommon for a battery to be damaged or ruined by an episode of 100% discharge.  This type of battery, that is a STARTING battery, is not designed for deep cycling.  You may want to take it to an automotive shop and have it load tested before you button your bike back up.
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Offline flashback50

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2017, 06:44:21 pm »
I would get into the habit of turning the bike off with the key and not the kill switch. Will save you same headache in the future from forgetting to turn the key off.

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2017, 07:15:21 pm »
Pull the battery and charge it properly on a charger.  While you have the battery out you can abrasively clean the connections on the cables and posts on the battery.  While you're at it abrasively clean the ground connections at the frame as iffy grounds seem to cause lots of little problems.  Shortcuts can lead to future disappointments.

This.... :great:

Some people out there have listened well, and memorized my words....
Thank you.

Trying to restore a flattened battery, by jumping it, and riding it... is just a loosing proposition. Take it as the lazy wasteful effort approach to correcting reliably a serious problem.
The bike will never.properly "charge" the battery, even if you rode it for 24 hours. Yes, it will bring the volts up, close to spec, but that isn't how batteries really work. Think of the bikes alternator charging circuit as a "maintainer" not a charger, it directive is to supply current to operaate the tertiary electronics of the bike, and offer up enough "charge" to replace what is used to start the bike...
You can't get the internal plates and electrolyte composition to effectively emulate the originally manufactured reaction by the use of a "tender/maintainer" once a batt has been drained... it takes a full deep cycle charge on a reliable "charger" to migrate the chemical composition of the cathode and anode plates in the battery, along with the chemical reaction of releasing the chemical back into the electrolyte, for ionice function..

The cable thing is also an issue when trying to "charge" a battery in the bike, thru the cables... ain't the same as attaching a charger directly to the battery on a bench..   I've pulled batteries from bikes that showed full volts, but were shortcutted in methods, and placed them under a load test... and all will show marked poor deep cycle performance.. you might start the bike,.a couple times, and after a week.. it won't start again.... click, click...buzzzz
That same battery, fully charged, may be restored to 90% of its original performance level.

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline TicTac

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #10 on: August 30, 2017, 08:28:49 pm »
Due to my forgetting to turn the switch off after stopping the engine, my battery is completely dead.  I'm new to the bike and KiPass -- what do I need to do to KiPass to be able to push start the bike?

I don't know about C14 battery but it worked well for me on the odyssey PC680 (used in my BMW bike)

Procedure to recover deeply discharged ODYSSEY® batteries
For safety reasons many 6V/12V automotive/commercial type chargers will
not turn on when an attempt is made to charge any style 12V battery that
has a very low open circuit voltage (OCV). For example, a charger set for
12V charging connected to a 12V battery that has an OCV less than 4-5V,
the charger senses it is connected to a 6V battery (which it is not) and
therefore will not initiate a charge because it is set for 12V charging.
Your ODYSSEY battery has very high recharge efficiency and is robust
enough to accept a charge even when its OCV is less than 5.0V. As long
as the charger’s output voltage does not rise above 15.0V the following
procedure should allow you to bypass the charger’s safety circuit and
safely attempt to recover (charge) the ODYSSEY Battery. One note;
ODYSSEY batteries that have been operated over a prolonged period of
time and have not routinely been charged back to near or full charge will
have developed sulfated oxide and can be more difficult to recover. In
some cases, if the sulfation condition is well developed especially over
time, it may not be possible to achieve full capacity. This condition is not a
warrantable claim as it is not the result of a factory manufacturing defect
but abuse or neglect in the application.
With the charger connected and even though the battery has a low OCV
and the charger does start up, then a full recharge should be attempted.
Monitor the battery temperature and if it should get hot to the touch
(125+°F, 51°C), then stop charging and allow the battery to cool. Once at
room temperature, reengage charging and allow to fully charge. Test for
capacity and if still low, discharge to 10.0V and recharge again and retest.
If the charger will not engage, the following procedure can be used –
1. Using jumper cables connect the positive terminal of a healthy battery
to the positive terminal of the dead ODYSSEY battery; then connect
the negative terminal of the healthy battery to the negative terminal of
the ODYSSEY battery. If you are using the battery in a car, do not
run the engine during this operation.
2. Monitor the voltage of the ODYSSEY battery with a good quality
voltmeter until it reads 11.5-11.8V.
3. Disconnect the jumper cables on the ODYSSEY battery, then quickly
connect the positive cable of the charger to the positive terminal of
the ODYSSEY battery; then connect the negative cable to the
negative terminal of the ODYSSEY battery.
4. The charger needs to be of a minimum charge current capability per
the chart below.
5. Plug the charger into standard wall AC power and start monitoring the
battery voltage.
6. Make sure the charge voltage at the battery terminals does not
exceed 15.0V and continue charging for approximately 8 hours.
7. Disconnect the charger and allow the battery to sit open circuit with
no connections for 12 hours or install the battery and turn the
headlights on for 2 minutes to remove the charging surface charge
voltage. Turn the headlights off, allow the battery to rest for a few
minutes and read its voltage. A fully charged ODYSSEY battery will
read 12.84V verifying a full charge.
Battery Models Minimum Charging Amperage
PC310 – PC680 6 amps*
PC925 - PC1200 12 amps*
PC1220 – PC1750 25 amps*
PC1800-PC2250 50 amps*
* Recommended charging amperages are for single (boost) recovery
charge cycles, not for repetitive deep cycle charging.

Offline Rob9876

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2017, 12:48:14 am »
I would get into the habit of turning the bike off with the key and not the kill switch. Will save you same headache in the future from forgetting to turn the key off.
You know, I had such a good habit with my old bikes of always having the key in my hand before dismounting.  Still getting used to not using a key -- not entirely sure I like it (especially after this).

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #12 on: August 31, 2017, 03:01:20 am »
Due to my forgetting to turn the switch off after stopping the engine, my battery is completely dead.  I'm new to the bike and KiPass -- what do I need to do to KiPass to be able to push start the bike?

I don't know about C14 battery but it worked well for me on the odyssey PC680 (used in my BMW bike)

Procedure to recover deeply discharged ODYSSEY® batteries
For safety reasons many 6V/12V automotive/commercial type chargers will
not turn on when an attempt is made to charge any style 12V battery that
has a very low open circuit voltage (OCV). For example, a charger set for
12V charging connected to a 12V battery that has an OCV less than 4-5V,
the charger senses it is connected to a 6V battery (which it is not) and
therefore will not initiate a charge because it is set for 12V charging.
Your ODYSSEY battery has very high recharge efficiency and is robust
enough to accept a charge even when its OCV is less than 5.0V. As long
as the charger’s output voltage does not rise above 15.0V the following
procedure should allow you to bypass the charger’s safety circuit and
safely attempt to recover (charge) the ODYSSEY Battery. One note;
ODYSSEY batteries that have been operated over a prolonged period of
time and have not routinely been charged back to near or full charge will
have developed sulfated oxide and can be more difficult to recover. In
some cases, if the sulfation condition is well developed especially over
time, it may not be possible to achieve full capacity. This condition is not a
warrantable claim as it is not the result of a factory manufacturing defect
but abuse or neglect in the application.
With the charger connected and even though the battery has a low OCV
and the charger does start up, then a full recharge should be attempted.
Monitor the battery temperature and if it should get hot to the touch
(125+°F, 51°C), then stop charging and allow the battery to cool. Once at
room temperature, reengage charging and allow to fully charge. Test for
capacity and if still low, discharge to 10.0V and recharge again and retest.
If the charger will not engage, the following procedure can be used –
1. Using jumper cables connect the positive terminal of a healthy battery
to the positive terminal of the dead ODYSSEY battery; then connect
the negative terminal of the healthy battery to the negative terminal of
the ODYSSEY battery. If you are using the battery in a car, do not
run the engine during this operation.
2. Monitor the voltage of the ODYSSEY battery with a good quality
voltmeter until it reads 11.5-11.8V.
3. Disconnect the jumper cables on the ODYSSEY battery, then quickly
connect the positive cable of the charger to the positive terminal of
the ODYSSEY battery; then connect the negative cable to the
negative terminal of the ODYSSEY battery.
4. The charger needs to be of a minimum charge current capability per
the chart below.
5. Plug the charger into standard wall AC power and start monitoring the
battery voltage.
6. Make sure the charge voltage at the battery terminals does not
exceed 15.0V and continue charging for approximately 8 hours.
7. Disconnect the charger and allow the battery to sit open circuit with
no connections for 12 hours or install the battery and turn the
headlights on for 2 minutes to remove the charging surface charge
voltage. Turn the headlights off, allow the battery to rest for a few
minutes and read its voltage. A fully charged ODYSSEY battery will
read 12.84V verifying a full charge.
Battery Models Minimum Charging Amperage
PC310 – PC680 6 amps*
PC925 - PC1200 12 amps*
PC1220 – PC1750 25 amps*
PC1800-PC2250 50 amps*
* Recommended charging amperages are for single (boost) recovery
charge cycles, not for repetitive deep cycle charging.

Tictac
Thanks for sharing that, it is specifically designed as a "instruction" primer sent with the Oddysey batteries, which I have used before in my C10's, and other bikes...
I will however make a point here,.without getting over technical..
You will see in the quoted stuff, the fact Oddysey makes statements  as I did prior, about the propensity of needing to do some cycling to release the potential of the battery in question... but...

There is a BIG missing factor in their instructions... specifically when saying to charge for "x" amount of time...
They have made absolutly no mention of the charging "rate" in Amperes, for the "times" they noted.. meaning, if you have a charger that does 2/6/10+ amp rates, and make the mistake of throwing that batt on 10+amp rate for 8 hours... well, not such a good idea... and especially not good for an aftermarket battery other than an Oddysey one...


Any normal sealed battery common to the OEM, should not be "charged" above a 2 amp rate, for anymore than an hour, while being monitored, and checked for temperature.. even when charging at a 2 amp rate, in manual mode, it should not take more than 8 hours, more like 6 max, to rejuvinate it to its correct state.

I take this whole process a little further when "bringing a sealed battery back from the dead"... I place it on a 2 amp rate,.for an hour... sitting on bench.. then disconnect it, and let it sit another half hour... I then turn the battery upside down, and shake it, and repaet this for every side of the battery, which results in 5 various agitations... this in effect "breaks" any intra cell debris and crystaline "bridging" between the plates, and also mixes the electrolyte up, getting the additives used in these modern cell batteries into a homogenized state in the electrolyte (the calcium additives, and resultant phosphate salts tend to sink to the bottom, and bridge the plates, reducing the efficiency of the charging from getting them disolved, and back into solution..)

Then, I let the battery rest a half hour sitting upright, and continue charging at a 2 amp rate, for the remaing time.
At that point, I remove the charger, and.let it sit,.to.allow.surface charge to stabilize, and allow absorption of the gasses produced back into the so,ution..
After an hour,.or even overnight, I use a 12v tail light bulb,.wired up, and get the flow of ions going again,.by running that bulb for about 60 seconds..
When that has been done, you can get a good read on a voltmeter, and if you wish, install the battery.and run it, or install a "tender" for a maintainer thing..
When I do a maintainer, I periodically remove it, and let the battery sit overnight, and reattach the maintainer... and find it will go back into charge mode for a short period of time again, instaed of just giving the green light.

I find that "data" various battery manufacturers give out today, is just a catch all, and due to their propeitary compositions of additives now used as enhancers of their electrolytes, they all vary radically on the outcome.. at least Oddysey does come forward and give some instruction, but missing the boat on suggested charge rate negates the benefit... I like those batteries tho,.so don't get me wrong, I still find them the best product on the market as a replacement...I've never killed one to date, and they are priced fine by my thoughts... Lithium batts... well, I ain't going to open that worm can, living in the zone I live in with winter temps below zero... and also holding multiple patents on lithium ion batteries.. I'll just say, in 5-7 more years, lithium batteries prices will drop, and the product will be stable and an affordable thing... $300 for a battery, knowing how they are made, is rediculous...   great for a phone, annd the prices reflect why... those products have reduced in price 10x since 1990.  I can buy a 1400mah battery now for $25, in 1995 if you could find one, it was over $300...  for a phone battery?

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline Charby

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #13 on: August 31, 2017, 03:59:44 am »
Due to my forgetting to turn the switch off after stopping the engine, my battery is completely dead.  I'm new to the bike and KiPass -- what do I need to do to KiPass to be able to push start the bike?

I don't know about C14 battery but it worked well for me on the odyssey PC680 (used in my BMW bike)

Procedure to recover deeply discharged ODYSSEY® batteries
For safety reasons many 6V/12V automotive/commercial type chargers will
not turn on when an attempt is made to charge any style 12V battery that
has a very low open circuit voltage (OCV). For example, a charger set for
12V charging connected to a 12V battery that has an OCV less than 4-5V,
the charger senses it is connected to a 6V battery (which it is not) and
therefore will not initiate a charge because it is set for 12V charging.
Your ODYSSEY battery has very high recharge efficiency and is robust
enough to accept a charge even when its OCV is less than 5.0V. As long
as the charger’s output voltage does not rise above 15.0V the following
procedure should allow you to bypass the charger’s safety circuit and
safely attempt to recover (charge) the ODYSSEY Battery. One note;
ODYSSEY batteries that have been operated over a prolonged period of
time and have not routinely been charged back to near or full charge will
have developed sulfated oxide and can be more difficult to recover. In
some cases, if the sulfation condition is well developed especially over
time, it may not be possible to achieve full capacity. This condition is not a
warrantable claim as it is not the result of a factory manufacturing defect
but abuse or neglect in the application.
With the charger connected and even though the battery has a low OCV
and the charger does start up, then a full recharge should be attempted.
Monitor the battery temperature and if it should get hot to the touch
(125+°F, 51°C), then stop charging and allow the battery to cool. Once at
room temperature, reengage charging and allow to fully charge. Test for
capacity and if still low, discharge to 10.0V and recharge again and retest.
If the charger will not engage, the following procedure can be used –
1. Using jumper cables connect the positive terminal of a healthy battery
to the positive terminal of the dead ODYSSEY battery; then connect
the negative terminal of the healthy battery to the negative terminal of
the ODYSSEY battery. If you are using the battery in a car, do not
run the engine during this operation.
2. Monitor the voltage of the ODYSSEY battery with a good quality
voltmeter until it reads 11.5-11.8V.
3. Disconnect the jumper cables on the ODYSSEY battery, then quickly
connect the positive cable of the charger to the positive terminal of
the ODYSSEY battery; then connect the negative cable to the
negative terminal of the ODYSSEY battery.
4. The charger needs to be of a minimum charge current capability per
the chart below.
5. Plug the charger into standard wall AC power and start monitoring the
battery voltage.
6. Make sure the charge voltage at the battery terminals does not
exceed 15.0V and continue charging for approximately 8 hours.
7. Disconnect the charger and allow the battery to sit open circuit with
no connections for 12 hours or install the battery and turn the
headlights on for 2 minutes to remove the charging surface charge
voltage. Turn the headlights off, allow the battery to rest for a few
minutes and read its voltage. A fully charged ODYSSEY battery will
read 12.84V verifying a full charge.
Battery Models Minimum Charging Amperage
PC310 – PC680 6 amps*
PC925 - PC1200 12 amps*
PC1220 – PC1750 25 amps*
PC1800-PC2250 50 amps*
* Recommended charging amperages are for single (boost) recovery
charge cycles, not for repetitive deep cycle charging.

Tictac
Thanks for sharing that, it is specifically designed as a "instruction" primer sent with the Oddysey batteries, which I have used before in my C10's, and other bikes...
I will however make a point here,.without getting over technical..
You will see in the quoted stuff, the fact Oddysey makes statements  as I did prior, about the propensity of needing to do some cycling to release the potential of the battery in question... but...

There is a BIG missing factor in their instructions... specifically when saying to charge for "x" amount of time...
They have made absolutly no mention of the charging "rate" in Amperes, for the "times" they noted.. meaning, if you have a charger that does 2/6/10+ amp rates, and make the mistake of throwing that batt on 10+amp rate for 8 hours... well, not such a good idea... and especially not good for an aftermarket battery other than an Oddysey one...


Any normal sealed battery common to the OEM, should not be "charged" above a 2 amp rate, for anymore than an hour, while being monitored, and checked for temperature.. even when charging at a 2 amp rate, in manual mode, it should not take more than 8 hours, more like 6 max, to rejuvinate it to its correct state.

I take this whole process a little further when "bringing a sealed battery back from the dead"... I place it on a 2 amp rate,.for an hour... sitting on bench.. then disconnect it, and let it sit another half hour... I then turn the battery upside down, and shake it, and repaet this for every side of the battery, which results in 5 various agitations... this in effect "breaks" any intra cell debris and crystaline "bridging" between the plates, and also mixes the electrolyte up, getting the additives used in these modern cell batteries into a homogenized state in the electrolyte (the calcium additives, and resultant phosphate salts tend to sink to the bottom, and bridge the plates, reducing the efficiency of the charging from getting them disolved, and back into solution..)

Then, I let the battery rest a half hour sitting upright, and continue charging at a 2 amp rate, for the remaing time.
At that point, I remove the charger, and.let it sit,.to.allow.surface charge to stabilize, and allow absorption of the gasses produced back into the so,ution..
After an hour,.or even overnight, I use a 12v tail light bulb,.wired up, and get the flow of ions going again,.by running that bulb for about 60 seconds..
When that has been done, you can get a good read on a voltmeter, and if you wish, install the battery.and run it, or install a "tender" for a maintainer thing..
When I do a maintainer, I periodically remove it, and let the battery sit overnight, and reattach the maintainer... and find it will go back into charge mode for a short period of time again, instaed of just giving the green light.

I find that "data" various battery manufacturers give out today, is just a catch all, and due to their propeitary compositions of additives now used as enhancers of their electrolytes, they all vary radically on the outcome.. at least Oddysey does come forward and give some instruction, but missing the boat on suggested charge rate negates the benefit... I like those batteries tho,.so don't get me wrong, I still find them the best product on the market as a replacement...I've never killed one to date, and they are priced fine by my thoughts... Lithium batts... well, I ain't going to open that worm can, living in the zone I live in with winter temps below zero... and also holding multiple patents on lithium ion batteries.. I'll just say, in 5-7 more years, lithium batteries prices will drop, and the product will be stable and an affordable thing... $300 for a battery, knowing how they are made, is rediculous...   great for a phone, annd the prices reflect why... those products have reduced in price 10x since 1990.  I can buy a 1400mah battery now for $25, in 1995 if you could find one, it was over $300...  for a phone battery?


Dang. I might have to send my battery to you if it ever needs recharged. :017: :017: :017:

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2017, 05:26:33 am »
In the last 4 years, I've brought back 3 bike batteries, and 2 mower batteries, using these techniques,.and methods... and everytime I began, I assumed I would be buying a new battery to replace them... only had a "fail" on one, a normal lead acid flooded type, that froze after a 2 year storage, improprperly of course...

Now I have pretty much resigned to removing them, and bringing them all indoors, for winter, placing them all on a bench in the basement, jumpering them all together in parallel, and throwing a single Tender on them.. all of them together.I'll let ya know how that all works out next april/may...even tho I know it is gonna work fine, especially when they are all.precharged fully, and sitting in my warm basement.

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline gpd323

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2017, 01:53:38 pm »
I have a CTEK charger that can bring the dead back to life. But as said after multiple complete discharges a wet cell battery just won't come back. I use AGM in my bikes.

https://www.amazon.com/CTEK-56-864-Automatic-Battery-Charger/dp/B006G14FK8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1504191068&sr=8-3&keywords=ctek+battery+charger
Greg Downing
Beautiful Downtown Spanaway
Washington State

Ride while you can.

Offline Rob9876

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2017, 05:15:27 pm »
After learning in this thread that I couldn't just push start/bump start the Concours, I went ahead an purchased a jump starter before seeing the posts saying to charge the battery other ways.  So far, it's been holding a charge and starting every time after the first jump start -- but I'm keeping the jump starter charged and with me just in case.

Right now it's generally showing 12.4 when first turned on, increasing to about 14.1 after riding a while.  Is the 12.4 number within the normal range for a cold start?

Offline robertv

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2017, 06:59:14 pm »
After learning in this thread that I couldn't just push start/bump start the Concours, I went ahead an purchased a jump starter before seeing the posts saying to charge the battery other ways.  So far, it's been holding a charge and starting every time after the first jump start -- but I'm keeping the jump starter charged and with me just in case.

Right now it's generally showing 12.4 when first turned on, increasing to about 14.1 after riding a while.  Is the 12.4 number within the normal range for a cold start?

Sounds about right for starting, but after riding I believe it should be around 14.4 - 14.7. At least that's the range of voltage I see.

2008 C14, silver [current]
2000 C10, red [sold]

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2017, 07:16:47 pm »
After learning in this thread that I couldn't just push start/bump start the Concours, I went ahead an purchased a jump starter before seeing the posts saying to charge the battery other ways.  So far, it's been holding a charge and starting every time after the first jump start -- but I'm keeping the jump starter charged and with me just in case.

Right now it's generally showing 12.4 when first turned on, increasing to about 14.1 after riding a while.  Is the 12.4 number within the normal range for a cold start?

12.4 is about a bare minimum... and repeated starts and short rides may have you stranded... simple fact is if it is charged, and showing 14+ v when shut off, and then 12.4 the next day.. that battery is played out.. end of life... almost done... kaput.
Those jumper packs are really neat, and helpful in emergency situations... but when you add up the costs.. buying a new battery is the logical expense.

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Offline "SS"

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2017, 09:28:35 pm »
I'm surprised to see no one has ever "tried" to bump start the C14...I've had to do it several times after killing the battery...luckily i was on a hill both times and had someone push me once other...I turned Ki-pass on like you normally would, put in Neutral because it rolls better, then pull clutch in quick shift in first/second gear and release...but hold on , about jerked out of my hands...little too much throttle I reckon  :motonoises:

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #20 on: September 20, 2017, 09:54:46 pm »
I'm surprised to see no one has ever "tried" to bump start the C14...I've had to do it several times after killing the battery...luckily i was on a hill both times and had someone push me once other...I turned Ki-pass on like you normally would, put in Neutral because it rolls better, then pull clutch in quick shift in first/second gear and release...but hold on , about jerked out of my hands...little too much throttle I reckon  :motonoises:

We have tried....
You lucked out..... you had enough reserve in your battery to allow the kipass to function, unlock the switch, and bring up the display....
Only way you got it to work... also you may have still had some residual fuel pressure to the throttle bodies.. or, enough to allow the pump to cycle for a second before your attempt...

With a dead battery, one below 10v, it won't work.. downhill with 5 guys pushing...

So just saying, if you got the display, and actually could turn the key, yeah, it was maybe bumpable....wee have started some hovering at 10v, but anything less.. and it ain't gonna happen... then you push it back uphill. :rotflmao: :rotflmao: :rotflmao: >:( :??: :rotflmao:

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Offline Rob9876

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Re: Battery Dead - How to Push Start with KiPass
« Reply #21 on: September 21, 2017, 01:58:40 am »
Yes, mine was totally dead and I couldn't get it to turn to ON before coasting.  I've bump started a motorcycle before, but it just wasn't happening with the Concours.