Author Topic: Battery Tender  (Read 596 times)

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Offline jelomadnes

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Battery Tender
« on: April 10, 2017, 08:38:31 pm »
I'm planning on installing a tender when I get home tonight. My question is, other than maybe the clock being rest, is there anything thing I need to be concerned with when I disconnect the battery?

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Battery Tender
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2017, 09:10:09 pm »
I'm planning on installing a tender when I get home tonight. My question is, other than maybe the clock being rest, is there anything thing I need to be concerned with when I disconnect the battery?

Yes
A few things are highly suggested....
If your battery is 3 or more years old, consider a replacement within the next year.

When you remove the connections, remove the battery, and abrasivly clean the contact points on both terminals with sand paper, also do the same thing to the cable ends, and also remove both ground wires where they attach to the frame, next to the battery, and clean them also....

If the battery is already low, and not at full charge, charge it on a real, manual battery charger at a 2 amp rate, untill it is fully charged.

Then install everything, and use the tender as a maintainer charger.
A tender will not fully charge a batt that has been sitting and is drained, it will only offer a surface charge, not a deep cycle charge.
Also note, a tender placed on a batt that has not had the terminals and connections cleaned, will also not correctly charge or maintain, as an invisible resistive coating may have formed during the past few monthes. And a tender will not "revive" a dead batt either, that really requires a good charger.

Running a maintainer is good, but the other areas I have addressed insure it actually works, and when left on a maintainer for many months, a resistive connection will still occur, its just a basic fact of the charging/discharging cycle.


Best of luck,

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline JDSCO

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Re: Battery Tender
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2017, 01:30:59 pm »
If your battery is 3 or more years old, consider a replacement within the next year.

I have a 2013 KTM Adv Baja that came with a YUASA YTZ-14S (sealed wet cell) as oem.
The KTM comes standard with a unswitched 12v adaptor and I wired a 12v male to plug into the Battery Tender.
Connection is very convenient. It has always been on a Deltran Battery Tender since new.
I ride a lot of singletrack and twotrack, sometimes not seeing anyone all day.
I do not want to be left abandoned with a old, dead battery so I have never ran a battery service for more than three years. I installed a new YTZ in March 2017. By the way, YUASA YTZ-14S is $142, free shipping through Amazon and $170+shipping through dealers.

Interesting fact- the original YTZ-14S is still holding 12.76v, off tender and sitting in my garage for four weeks.
I think the Battery Tender has something to do with longevity as well as YUASA improving their battery quality, as I have been told.
I'm not going to attempt using a battery more than three years but I do trust YUASA YTZ and Deltran Battery Tenders.

« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 01:34:58 pm by JDSCO »
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Offline Harry Martin

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Re: Battery Tender
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2017, 03:42:54 pm »
I have successfully brought back to life 2 dead batteries using a Battery Tender. Flashing red says bad battery or hookup, but did eventually charge the battery after a couple of tries. Red light stops flashing and starts to charge.

I have also used my Battery Tenders connected to the battery left in the bike all winter with no issues.

Just make sure you connect the leads to the battery first before plugging into AC, and for disconnect, remove AC first, then the charging cables. I know cause I fried a Battery Tender once and was able to repair it.
Harry in Wild and Windy Casper, WY - 1986 Vintage "Silverdammit" - 2015 "Greendammit"

Offline GIant81

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Re: Battery Tender
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2017, 03:50:55 pm »
Every bike I've ever owned either came with a set of ring terminal tender leads or I put a set on.  I have a tender pigtail hanging on every bike I've ever owned.  When I store for winter, or if I leave the bike for an extended period of time, I toss a tender on it.

During the winter, I rotate the tender for about a week at a time between the two bikes in my garage.  Before I had the tender, I'd just toss a 2-3amp trickle charger on in the spring, and she'd fire right up, but I feel keeping it topped off is easier on the battery.