Author Topic: C10 vrs C14  (Read 3781 times)

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Offline Dale_Eads_FL

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C10 vrs C14
« on: October 12, 2008, 11:04:00 am »
I've owned 3 connies and curently have a 05 witch I love, but i'm thinking of purchashing a 09 C14. What are the differences? Handling, weight,etc.  

Offline JPavlis_CA

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C10 vrs C14
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2008, 07:27:00 pm »
I've had a Connie since 4/86. Still have my second, my '95. Combined mileage of over 370,000. Bought an '08 C14 one year ago and have 7500 on it.    The 14 is taller, heavier, faster, handles better, brakes better, gets worse mpg. I feel I sit "on" the 14 as opposed to sitting "in" the 10. I think a lot of that is I have lower bars are my 10, as a result I sit more upright on the 14. The 14, while taller, does not feel as top heavy - better weight balance and smaller tank maybe?    The bars are about an inch wider than the 10's, which caused me some hand problems till I got used to it. Too much pressure on the fleshy outside part of the palm. Also, the pegs are higher and further back in relation to the saddle. Also, the passenger peg mounting brackets force your heels out when riding on the balls of your feet - can you say pidgeon-toed? Did I mention the bike is tall? I know guys with less than 34" inseams who ride 'em, but to me it would be scary only getting one foot down on a bike this heavy.    The stock saddle sucks for some, is great for others. Oh, and no way to mount up highway pegs of any sort if this is important. Windscreen sucks in any position but down. But like the saddle, too subjective to be meaningful, you may be happy with it.    I'm sure there's more, but I'm drawing a blank. Maybe a specific question... ?     :)  
All God's male children tend to be low-life, sleaze-ball, early apexers - Terry Earwood, Chief Instructor, Skip Barber Racing School.

Offline Dale_Eads_FL

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C10 vrs C14
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2008, 08:05:00 pm »
Thanks for the Info, that answers most of my questions. I lowered my 05 ,had the seat cut down and added bar risers this made a big difference. I only have about 5500 miles on It, all mountain miles. Maybe you know how it Is, this is the first time in years that i only own one bike.  

Offline Brett0769

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« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2008, 01:05:00 pm »
There's a drippy, gooey love discussion here in the forums about the C14 where everybody who owns one drools over them. ;)    I love my C10 though, not to say I'd turn down a C14 or that I don't openly want one, but it's kind of hard to convince myself to get another sport tourer (since I'd NEVER give up my C10) when there are other types of bikes I want to own. My next target is a KLR-650 I think to fill my adventure touring slot, then a small cruiser will come after, though which one is way up in the air. Cruisers are a pretty saturated market it seems, lots of choices from lots of makers.   ;)    Not that adventure touring is locked up by the KLR-650 by any means, but for all around functionality for the buck it's a hard bike to beat.  
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Offline Rev Ryder

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C10 vrs C14
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2008, 04:10:00 pm »
I'm with Brett in the "sure I want one, but I'm not out to get one" deal. My problem is primarily a financial one.  I can't spend 10k+ on a bike.  Then I can't insure one that carries a pretty big price tag there too.     Oh yeah, I know I've lusted after that behemoth engine and the USD forks and killer brakes.  Folks praise the handling and that makes me want one even more... so I'm building it a little at a time.  I wanted more power... now I have it, in spades.  I wanted to improve handling and eliminate the terrible dive I had before with the stock toothpick forks, not to mention the bling bling of USD forks... so I got em complete with with radial brakes and larger discs than the C14.  I'm tired of play nursemaid to four 22 year old carburetors... so those are going away too in favor of injection.    When I get done... sure, it won't be a C-14... but it will probably do what the C-14 does and more for less than half the cost... and I can still amaze the cop writing me that big ol ticket when I tell him, "It's a 1986 model sir."   :eg:    It's been said that pretty soon it'll be hard to convince folks I even have a Connie under that stuff... but just cuz it doesn't run like a Connie, or buzz like a Connie, or dive like a Connie, or stop like a Connie, or flop around corners like a Connie... doesn't mean it ain't a Connie.  And besides, I'm having the time of my life playing with my second best girl.    In concluding, I will probably continue to lust after the beauty and style, grace and power of the new platform that is the C-14... but even if I had one of them critters I'd be doing like Fred and so many others trying to make it better (dang straight it needs a turbo).  :)  
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Offline Dale_Eads_FL

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C10 vrs C14
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2008, 10:12:00 pm »
You say heavier, the C14 @ 606 lbs and the C10 @ 595 lbs that's only 11 lbs difference. Is the handling that much better?  

Offline JPavlis_CA

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« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2008, 12:35:00 pm »
My C10 weighs 645lbs with a full tank of gas. My C14 is 685. These are measured weights, not from a manual or sales brochure. So yeah, it's heavier by 40 lbs.    The handling is definitely a step up from the C10.  
All God's male children tend to be low-life, sleaze-ball, early apexers - Terry Earwood, Chief Instructor, Skip Barber Racing School.

Offline Paulie

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« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2008, 03:36:00 pm »
It is kinda apples n oranges. But my Conc's pork is by far its wurst attribute. I'm disapointed that the new 1 is also a heavy toad. The dinky 5.8 gal tank too.  01 Conc, Mijami Floriduh  Over the Pond 06: http://tinyurl.com/2vk9o2 route map: http://tinyurl.com/4p7pmd  

Offline Steve in Sunny Fla

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« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2008, 12:54:00 am »
I had the obligatory 20 minute test ride on a c-14 at Daytona. I was very impressed with the power and handling, and how the weight was well managed. A really solid platform. I also had a zzr1200 for a short bit, and to me the bikes were very comparable. Now a stock c-10? Not so much. Like Rev, I "fixed" the c-10's shortfalls to what I consider acceptable standards. at this point I don't lust for 14, I'm actually pretty impressed with the all around bike my c-10 has become.    Now the bad part - it only took me 3.5 years and totalling a c-10 to get to this point. But wow, what a journey. Steve   Shleper of the 7th gear unit and performance exhaust cam sprockets.       My bike - "SHOODABEN" - 1109cc's of what an 04 concours "shoodaben"!
C-14 ECU flashing for performance and rideability enhancement
C-10 Carb work , cams, & performance enhancements
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Offline Rev Ryder

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« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2008, 01:09:00 am »
Art takes patience, vision, creativity, and a sensitive muse.   Shouldabeen is art.  Dan's ZGRX is art.  The Turbo is not yet art.  Dang fast and fun, but it ain't yet art.  If someone offered me a new C14 for the Turbo, well... I'd have to buy a bigger turbo to fit that sucker. :eg:    I don't know, if i had a C14 I can't see myself havin as much fun.  Half the fun is in the building and the C10 has more room to build stuff that the C14 already has.  
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Offline Steve in Sunny Fla

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« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2008, 01:24:00 pm »
 thanks for the compliment Chuck. don't forget there's something called "performance art" - that's your bike for sure!     one of the reasons we see room for improvement on the c-10 is that it's a dated design. Technology has marched on; the c-10 didn't. 20 years is the difference in wanting a 7th gear unit or not - in 86 with a 55 mph speed limit on the highway, who would want or need more engine or gearing than the stock c-10 had? therefore no need to look for improvememnts, the bike was state of the art. 20 years from now there will be lot's of improvements for the c-14, as it becomes old technology. Nessessity (and boredom) is indeed the mother of invention... Steve     Shleper of the 7th gear unit and performance exhaust cam sprockets.       My bike - "SHOODABEN" - 1109cc's of what an 04 concours "shoodaben"!
C-14 ECU flashing for performance and rideability enhancement
C-10 Carb work , cams, & performance enhancements
 " Modifications for sport-tourers, BY a sport-tourer"
https://sites.google.com/site/shoodabenengineering/home

Offline Brett0769

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« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2008, 04:36:00 pm »
Don't knock older technologies too much. No need for an electronics engineer when working on the C10. Hell, even I can do most stuff and that's saying A LOT.      
« Last Edit: November 11, 2008, 04:36:00 pm by Brett0769 »
'06 C10  Brett Hatfield  AMA# 1019197  COG# 8229 (CDA# 0267)    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/brett0769/2793453582/" title="Trip Home by Brett0769, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3223/2793453582_bba89ca959_t.jpg" width="100" height="75" alt="Trip Home" />[/url]

Offline Rich

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« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2008, 12:04:00 am »
This is a late reply to Jim Pavlis' observation regarding one of the late Jordan Krusoff's Laws of Desert Riding:  "See Gas, Buy It."      I think Jordan would be rather amused by the C14.  I am not inferring anything bad, but that's the way Jordan was.  After all, he thought the Ninja 900 was the most beautiful bike to come out Japan, Inc, but the only way he'd part with $$$ to buy one was to purchase two wrecked bikes and spend a winter teaching himself how to weld plastic.  He then painted it Silverdammit, fabricated lowered pegs and foot controls, and then fabricated the most rugged mounting system I have ever seen for two Bates hard saddle bags.  I rode that bike on a Three Flags, and it was quite functional, capable and comfy.    I think he'd be a little amazed at all the stuff on the C14.        The Original Rich Reed  COG #7  1986 Kawasaki Ninja 1000R  1977 Yamaha XS650 Standard  2004 Little Blue Chevy  "Over the hill it's five bucks.  Here in Idaho it's a hundred and eighty."  
« Last Edit: November 12, 2008, 12:06:00 am by Rich »
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Offline Boburns

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« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2008, 11:08:00 am »
Quote
           Don't knock older technologies too much. No need for an electronics engineer when working on the C10. Hell, even I can do most stuff and that's saying A LOT.  
   Stepping up to an FJR as I did, from a C10, I agree with Brett. The really neat thing about the C10 was that almost anyone can work on one. They are straightforward, simple machines to work on.     The one regret I have with the higher tech bikes is that they leave people like me, who are not electrical engineers, out in the cold when it comes to working on these new bikes.    I don't dare mess with the valve actuating system (shim under bucket) or anything to do with the ECU, the electrical, fuel and exhaust systems. It's all tied together in some mysterious electronic maze that simple minds like mine can't get ahold of.     My old C10 was great for being easy on the wallet when it came to maintenance. Not so the FJR and by inference, the C14.     ON THE OTHER HAND>>>>> Damn! I love my Feejer.   Bob "Flylooper" Burns  COG #5887  E Clampus Vitus, YB#1  '04 FJR 1300  
Bob "Flylooper" Burns  COG #5887  Former Editor, The Concourier  E Clampus Vitus, YB#1; '04 FJR 1300

Offline Charles W. (Chuck)_Hoefflin_IN

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« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2008, 10:18:00 am »
I've not ridden a C-10 so I have to defer to those of you who have and to a local friend who has owned both.  As someone said, this is sort of an apples and oranges comparison.  The technologies for the two bikes are more than a generation apart and, therefore, different.    However, my C-14, now that I have it set up for my cycling needs, does everything I want it to do.  I use a cycle for long distance touring, camping trips and cycle rallies, averaging about 15K miles per year.    My changes were a new windshield with mods to protect my hands, heated grips and clothing for cooler/rainy weather riding, seat rebuild to allow my longer riding days, bar risers and foot peg lowering devices to help my aging joints, Audiovox cruise to help retain my driver's license, and a GPS for directions and tunes.    I enjoy the C-14's smooth, easy, quiet power, the solid suspension, the great ABS brakes and the large rear cases.  My inseam is 31" and I can easily flat-foot the bike.    I would like to have a larger fuel tank (200 or so miles between stops is pretty short), it could be a bit lighter (mine weighs 690# Wet), the tires could last a bit longer (I'm getting 10K miles on Metzeler Z-6's) and the valve check interval could be longer (I am ready to do my first one now at 16K miles but will probably stretch the next one out to 25K miles or so).    Overall, I like it and plan on riding it for the next couple of years.