Author Topic: carrying Water on the road  (Read 4889 times)

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Offline jonathan

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #25 on: July 14, 2014, 01:00:28 pm »
I use the slime green Camelbak Classic for a little conspicuity.

Calgary, Alberta

Offline Chad

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2014, 01:13:43 am »
I don't like wearing a pack either, so I use a Camelbak and put it on my wife's back.  ;D

Fill it full of ice and then pour cold water in, and it will stay cold from breakfast to lunch. Refill at lunch and you're good to dinner. Worked out wonderfully.
Chad // 2009 Concours 14 // 2000 Concours 1000 //
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Offline Farkwar

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #27 on: July 15, 2014, 04:30:58 am »
My wife will freeze a camelback solid and wear it under a mesh jacket.The ice keeps her cool and when it melts I get cold water :)

Offline Gypsy JR

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #28 on: July 15, 2014, 09:37:33 am »
My wife will freeze a camelback solid and wear it under a mesh jacket.The ice keeps her cool and when it melts I get cold water :)

I will often freeze mine the night before, and put it in the refrigerator after its frozen the night before.

One good use for cold water is the body has to generate heat to maintain core temperature if you lower it with cold water. So you burn more calories. If you don't need to burn calories there is no benefit to cold water unless you are like me and hate tepid water.

 :motonoises:
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Offline mattchewn

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #29 on: July 15, 2014, 12:40:18 pm »
I don't drink ANY hot liquids intentionally. I despise hot or even warm water. I really don't even like cold water but unfortunately, it is necessary. I just got my new full gear setup ( Olympia MotoQuest) and it actually came with a hydration pack that zips onto the back of my jacket. I have been previously using a Camelbak 2 liter pack inside my tank bag, filled with gatorade or some other sports drinks, with excellent results. I cut down the bite valve so it would slide inside my helmet a bit easier (90 degree valve setup) and the tank bag actually keeps the iced drinks cold for close to 4 hours on a hot day. Since the new pack has a straight valve I am going to have to see about retrofitting it  for easier helmet clearance without opening the helmet face. I would be concerned about freezing the backpack but not the one in my tank bag.
Matt
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Offline jonathan

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #30 on: July 15, 2014, 01:38:56 pm »
I cut down the bite valve so it would slide inside my helmet a bit easier (90 degree valve setup)..
Matt

I took out the 90 degree valve and just connected the bite valve straight to the hose with a 5/16 vacuum hose connector. Makes it a lot easier to slip into my full face helmet from below.
Calgary, Alberta

Offline Gypsy JR

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #31 on: July 18, 2014, 12:17:49 pm »
Was looking on the Camelbak website, and they have a 100 oz. pack meant to be lashed to the deck of a kayak.

I am going to measure my tank bag, the hydration pack (Cortez) is 17.5" x 8" x 3.15" so it might fit inside.

This would be better than wearing one, even though I've gotten used to wearing them.
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Offline Conjob

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #32 on: July 18, 2014, 12:32:50 pm »
Was looking on the Camelbak website, and they have a 100 oz. pack meant to be lashed to the deck of a kayak.

I am going to measure my tank bag, the hydration pack (Cortez) is 17.5" x 8" x 3.15" so it might fit inside.

This would be better than wearing one, even though I've gotten used to wearing them.

I haven't seen that one, but my camelbak is the "unbottle". Same idea, has a clip on each corner(made to be attached to a backpack) and can be attached to just about anything. Works awesome behind me clipped to my wolfman bag.

Offline JimBob

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Re: carrying Water on the road
« Reply #33 on: July 18, 2014, 01:43:24 pm »
I have a small, cheap tank bag that's made from a neoprene-like material (about 3/16" thick) that I was using for small stuff (it's about 11"x9" and 4" deep). I bought a hydration bladder from walmart for $9.99. Fill it with ice and water (holds about 70 ounces) and I'm good for the day.

Remember, by the time you feel thirst, you're already behind the water curve. I've gotten a LOT better at noticing when I need water - it starts within ten minutes of being on the bike, no matter the weather (air flow sucks the moisture out of you). Better to sip regularly, than try to chug a bottle every two hours.

When it's hot out, I really appreciate the blabber being right there, and that I can grab the hose/bite valve with either hand (it's velcro'd to the outside of the bag), and it slides right under the chin bar.