Author Topic: New C14 break-in  (Read 6039 times)

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Offline arjay2

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Re: New C14 break-in
« Reply #25 on: April 30, 2012, 12:37:16 am »
Bought a new 2012 a week and a half ago. Breaking in per the manual. 4,000 rpm is 85-90 mph in top gear. Feel I can keep it below that as I get more familiar with the bike.
Bob  Arjay 2   2012 Concours

Offline elektra

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Re: New C14 break-in
« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2012, 01:49:03 am »
The biggest myth expounded in this thread is that bearing surfaces require break in. I'v read this time and time again and this is just an incorrect assumption.

Babbit bearings DO NOT REQURE ANY BREAK IN. Bearing are designed to run on a film of oil that cannot be compressed.  Any metal on metal contact, except at rest, would destroy the bearing, main or rod instantly. In addition, the surface of a babbit bearing is as soft as lead. The purpose of this soft metal layer is so that any metal fragments in the oil supply will embed into the soft bearing surface, leaving the crank unharmed.

Ball bearings are among the most closely dimensioned parts in the world of manufacturing. The balls and races are polished to 1micro inch or 1,000,000th inch tolerances. There is NO BREAK IN REQUIRED ON ANY ROLLER BEARING.

Even gears and valve seats are so finely polished in today's manufacturing techniques they require NO BREAK IN.

Due to the vastly improved metal casting and machining technologies which are now used, tight parts in new engines are not normal. A manufacturing mistake causing a tight clearance is an extremely rare occurrence. But, if there is something wrong with the engine clearances from the factory, no amount of gentle running-in will fix the problem.

The only break in on a modern engine is piston ring to cylinder wall. The very reason the cylinders are cross-hatched honed is to facilitate mating of the ring and cylinder wall and provide the tightest possible seal in the combustion chamber. The majority of this seal, whether successful or not, happens in the first 50 miles of riding. The tighter the seal the higher the compression the more power and less oil contamination.

Contrary to popular belief, piston rings don't seal the combustion pressure by spring tension. Ring tension is necessary only to "scrape" the oil off the cylinder walls to prevent it from entering the combustion chamber. The rings seal from the actual gas pressure itself !! The pressure gets behind the rings forcing them outward against the cylinder wall.

New rings are far from perfect and they must be worn in quite a bit in order to completely seal all the way around the bore. If the gas pressure is strong enough during the engine's first miles of operation (open that throttle !!!), then the entire ring will wear into the cylinder surface, to seal the combustion pressure as well as possible.  If the rings aren't forced against the walls soon enough, they'll use up the roughness before they fully seat.

With less than a perfect seal in the combustion chamber you have less power and a lifetime of leakage contaminating the oil with blow-by gasses which contain acids and other combustion by products.

« Last Edit: May 01, 2012, 05:46:07 pm by elektra »
'70 Honda 305 Dream, '79 Triumph 750 Bonneville, '85 BMW K100 Turbocharged, '95 HD Heritage, '97 HD Dresser, '97 HD Road King, 2001 HD Dyna, 2009 Kawi C14, 2011 Kawi C14 ABS

Offline elektra

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Re: New C14 break-in
« Reply #27 on: May 01, 2012, 05:29:35 pm »
And it wouldn't hurt to do an extra oil change very early, like after the first 50-100 miles. With the metal being scrubbed off the cylinder walls and rings, the last thing you want is that metal floating around your engine. The cam chain will act as a conveyor belt moving that contaminated oil up into the valve train. Not a good thing. Worth the extra couple of bucks. And stick with Kawi petroleum based oil for at least the first couple of oil changes before, and if, you switch to synthetic.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2012, 07:40:52 pm by elektra »
'70 Honda 305 Dream, '79 Triumph 750 Bonneville, '85 BMW K100 Turbocharged, '95 HD Heritage, '97 HD Dresser, '97 HD Road King, 2001 HD Dyna, 2009 Kawi C14, 2011 Kawi C14 ABS

Offline Don557

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Re: New C14 break-in
« Reply #28 on: May 04, 2012, 12:33:13 am »
Elektra, I have to say (and not just because it supports my opinion) that your second to last post above is likely the best written post I've seen on this or any forum, ever.  Great job.

Offline Old Man on a Connie

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Re: New C14 break-in
« Reply #29 on: May 04, 2012, 12:57:31 am »
My .02. It's all about the heat cycles like Fred Said (Sounds like a boy band). Bringing all the dis similar metals, alloys and plastics up to temp and allowing to cool several times and to set and seat. +1 on the bearings. In industry we rebuild motors and gear boxes and right back into service. Also +1 on the quick oil change to clean her out. Ride it like a rented mule for 10 minutes and let her cool or ride her with a tender hand for a half hour and cool. Same Same. Me, I did the rented mule, then the tender touch, then the rented mule just to mix it up. Used that on all my motors and no worries so far.
"I don't always ride street bikes, but when I do, It's a Concours. A C14 '11 silver to be precise." OTP 2017 Traveler. It was a Blast Baby. Still in it to Win it.

Offline elektra

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Re: New C14 break-in
« Reply #30 on: May 04, 2012, 01:10:23 am »
Thanks Don glad you liked the post.  I'v been riding, touring, breaking, wrenching, and enjoying motorcycles for over 40 years. Although I don't claim to be an expert by any means, I do have some knowledge that I like to share on occasion. I spend a lot of time researching things that interest me. And as a novelist I enjoy an opportunity to write about complicated and intricate details when I am sufficiently educated on the matter, although sometimes I may get a bit carried away. I hope this helped someone out there who may be mystified by what goes on inside their C14 engine.
'70 Honda 305 Dream, '79 Triumph 750 Bonneville, '85 BMW K100 Turbocharged, '95 HD Heritage, '97 HD Dresser, '97 HD Road King, 2001 HD Dyna, 2009 Kawi C14, 2011 Kawi C14 ABS