Author Topic: Problem with key barrel  (Read 507 times)

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Offline Redlion61

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Problem with key barrel
« on: June 23, 2019, 10:48:23 pm »
Well, it finally happened... Damn key barrel sticks hard when I set the key position to lock... Unholy amount of fidgeting required to move it to off - off to on, no problem.

So... I suspect a new barrel will be required. Anyone can give me an idea of the damage to my wallet? Have to get the darn thing to work properly before the national.

Will I need to take out a loan to pay for the darn thing? :'(
Chris Dupuis
IT Guy, 2012 Connie ZG14 Rider

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Problem with key barrel
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2019, 11:37:12 pm »
do what ever is humanly possible, to spritz it GENEROUSLY with WD-40, hold a rag below it while filling it, and then follow up with compressed air.. iirc, Fred Harmon actually took photos of a disassembled switch, and may have them on his website, can't say for sure... if you get stuck and have to buy a new switch, it will have to be programmed, along with FOB pieces, which is not fun.. and it is somewhat costly... stop using the "lock" feature for now, and use some other external method for securing the bike..  Like a hefty cable lock passed thru the rear wheel, and over the seat, to prevent it being rolled away.

   27006-0074   SWITCH-IGNITION
obsoleted part, new part number is   27006-0620

costs $670....
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 11:47:23 pm by MAN OF BLUES »

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Offline Redlion61

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Re: Problem with key barrel
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2019, 01:43:00 pm »
do what ever is humanly possible, to spritz it GENEROUSLY with WD-40, hold a rag below it while filling it, and then follow up with compressed air.. iirc, Fred Harmon actually took photos of a disassembled switch, and may have them on his website, can't say for sure... if you get stuck and have to buy a new switch, it will have to be programmed, along with FOB pieces, which is not fun.. and it is somewhat costly... stop using the "lock" feature for now, and use some other external method for securing the bike..  Like a hefty cable lock passed thru the rear wheel, and over the seat, to prevent it being rolled away.

   27006-0074   SWITCH-IGNITION
obsoleted part, new part number is   27006-0620

costs $670....

Thanks a million... WD40 and the air compressor did the trick... I'll keep the can in my emergency case!!!

Saved by COG, once again! ;)
Chris Dupuis
IT Guy, 2012 Connie ZG14 Rider

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Problem with key barrel
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2019, 08:28:38 pm »
do what ever is humanly possible, to spritz it GENEROUSLY with WD-40, hold a rag below it while filling it, and then follow up with compressed air.. iirc, Fred Harmon actually took photos of a disassembled switch, and may have them on his website, can't say for sure... if you get stuck and have to buy a new switch, it will have to be programmed, along with FOB pieces, which is not fun.. and it is somewhat costly... stop using the "lock" feature for now, and use some other external method for securing the bike..  Like a hefty cable lock passed thru the rear wheel, and over the seat, to prevent it being rolled away.

   27006-0074   SWITCH-IGNITION
obsoleted part, new part number is   27006-0620

costs $670....

Thanks a million... WD40 and the air compressor did the trick... I'll keep the can in my emergency case!!!

Saved by COG, once again! ;)

actually, I want to thank YOU, for the kind words, both here, and on the F/B page... I try to assist in the "saving $$$$" thing as much as possible, but F/B ain't exactly the venue that accepts what we discuss "here"..
glad to hear it all worked out for ya..
 :great: :great: :great:

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW
and if you are gonna call me names... it's MR. Analdweeb if you please...

Offline jawneelogik

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Re: Problem with key barrel
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2019, 11:49:16 am »
do what ever is humanly possible, to spritz it GENEROUSLY with WD-40, hold a rag below it while filling it, and then follow up with compressed air.. iirc, Fred Harmon actually took photos of a disassembled switch, and may have them on his website, can't say for sure... if you get stuck and have to buy a new switch, it will have to be programmed, along with FOB pieces, which is not fun.. and it is somewhat costly... stop using the "lock" feature for now, and use some other external method for securing the bike..  Like a hefty cable lock passed thru the rear wheel, and over the seat, to prevent it being rolled away.

   27006-0074   SWITCH-IGNITION
obsoleted part, new part number is   27006-0620

costs $670....

Thanks a million... WD40 and the air compressor did the trick... I'll keep the can in my emergency case!!!

Saved by COG, once again! ;)

Glad to see that you were able to get it freed up, but just for future reference, WD40 isn't necessarily the best thing to use for seized parts.  PB Blaster would be my recommendation.  I recently had my gas cap lock seize solid on me due to high humidity and corrosion on the pot metal that the lock barrel is made from.  A good soaking with PB Blaster, a couple of hours wait time then a few gentle taps on the barrel itself, voila!  I can again put fuel in the bike.

regards, john
2010 Kawi ZG1400ABS, 2000 Suzi Bandito 1200s
1985 Suzi GS1150, 1982 Suzi GS1100
1978 Suzi GS1000, 1975 Kawi 900
1973 Honda CB350F

Offline Egodriver71

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Re: Problem with key barrel
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2019, 10:29:04 am »
do what ever is humanly possible, to spritz it GENEROUSLY with WD-40, hold a rag below it while filling it, and then follow up with compressed air.. iirc, Fred Harmon actually took photos of a disassembled switch, and may have them on his website, can't say for sure... if you get stuck and have to buy a new switch, it will have to be programmed, along with FOB pieces, which is not fun.. and it is somewhat costly... stop using the "lock" feature for now, and use some other external method for securing the bike..  Like a hefty cable lock passed thru the rear wheel, and over the seat, to prevent it being rolled away.

   27006-0074   SWITCH-IGNITION
obsoleted part, new part number is   27006-0620

costs $670....

Thanks a million... WD40 and the air compressor did the trick... I'll keep the can in my emergency case!!!

Saved by COG, once again! ;)

Glad to see that you were able to get it freed up, but just for future reference, WD40 isn't necessarily the best thing to use for seized parts.  PB Blaster would be my recommendation.  I recently had my gas cap lock seize solid on me due to high humidity and corrosion on the pot metal that the lock barrel is made from.  A good soaking with PB Blaster, a couple of hours wait time then a few gentle taps on the barrel itself, voila!  I can again put fuel in the bike.

regards, john

Having played locksmith here in FL for a few years, WD-40 is the best thing to lubricate lock cylinders with in a high humidity environment.

Once a year, all of my lock cylinders get a shot of WD, including the house!!!
Thomas Mann
Jacksonville, FL

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Offline Redlion61

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Re: Problem with key barrel
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2019, 11:23:46 am »
Hmmm sounds like the oil wars...

PB Blaster or WD40!

On a similar problem, the best for sticky gas cap lock? I have to be careful not to contaminate the fuel, I did the graphite powder treatment last year, but it didn't last long....
Chris Dupuis
IT Guy, 2012 Connie ZG14 Rider

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Problem with key barrel
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2019, 06:19:50 pm »
Hmmm sounds like the oil wars...

PB Blaster or WD40!

On a similar problem, the best for sticky gas cap lock? I have to be careful not to contaminate the fuel, I did the graphite powder treatment last year, but it didn't last long....

Corroded bolts, external fasteners, and even things like "master/hasp type locks", are fine to use the old PB on, it stinks, and will always be smelly, ... But for use on an "Electrical device", like an ignition switch, in a "Plastic housing/shell/containing more plastic parts"... you would be a bit crazy to expose that to the aggressive chemicals in the "Blaster"...  as most of the respondents say about the WD treatment... it's pretty darned safe on plastic, won't melt it, displaces moisture, and offers the "flushing effect" which what I was trying to explain.. flushing out anything crusty, and blowing it all out dry with air....I wouldn't even "graphite inject" this ignition lock, as it can become clumpy later, when exposed to the elements, migrate into areas where it can collect again, and again creates pockets of "stuff", that may result in movement restrictions on other "non-rotating" parts of the assembly.

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW
and if you are gonna call me names... it's MR. Analdweeb if you please...