Author Topic: Scissors jack  (Read 572 times)

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Offline Doc

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Scissors jack
« on: November 26, 2017, 11:17:03 pm »
Anyone happy with their scissor jack?  Lots of choices  and would appreciate recommendations.  Thanks.

Offline TimR

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2017, 11:54:55 pm »
Personally I prefer a small hydraulic jack.  I think it's easier to run a handle up and down with one hand than trying to turn a crank with both hands when working close quarters. But maybe your scissor jack is different. Best, Tim
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Offline gPink

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2017, 12:13:15 am »
I've got a Blackjack I got from Directlift and have been very satisfied.

Offline Fred_Wa2gzw

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2017, 10:22:57 pm »
I have a couple of old Audi and Passat scissor jacks that I use in conjunction with a block of wood.  It's not the best arrangement but it does the trick.

Fred
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Offline C. Moore

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2017, 12:50:35 am »
I picked up a cheap one from harbor freight. Works just fine.
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Offline JTX

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2017, 10:42:24 am »
Personally I prefer a small hydraulic jack.  I think it's easier to run a handle up and down with one hand than trying to turn a crank with both hands when working close quarters. But maybe your scissor jack is different. Best, Tim


Most hydraulic jacks are not designed for extended time loaded with weight.  If this happens say because something breaks and you need to leave it supported overnight.  You can find it laying down in the AM.  Yikes.


I think everyone should have a basic scissor jack for their C14 for light duty.    But if you dont and use a hydraulic one, make sure its in good working order and not already leaking fluid because its from 1977.


Most basic scissor jacks are under 100$ and will probably work perfect for front-end work on most bikes for the occasional home-mechanic.  On a bike with a center stand, they aren't supporting much weight.  I think most of them are made pretty much the same and should be pretty similar in quality.


Be careful in the garage.

Offline Baggerjohn

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2017, 12:42:32 pm »
I got lucky this past summer when I was changing tires on both of mine - happened to spot a (well) used but perfectly serviceable Kawasaki jack plus all adapters on the auction site. Made them an offer they couldn't refuse and got it for $100 shipped.

That said...your floor has to be PERFECTLY flat for the bike to be steady while being supported by a scissor jack and the centerstand.

Offline rcannon409

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2017, 12:51:39 pm »
I bought two jacks, from ebay, that work really well.

The two I bought are from 2004 Neons. Nice, flat top and its fairly compact.

I spent way less than 30.00, but I suppose I would have paid 30.00, each, if I had to.

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Offline Jerdurr

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2017, 05:54:50 pm »
Guys, this post interests me quite a bit because I need to keep the front tire in the air over the winter, and I don't have a front lift (100 bucks). I'm thinking about getting 2x4 wood pieces to put under the front forks, but first I need to jack the front up. Where do you place the jack to lift the front? There's plastics everywhere, needless to say I don't want to break anything.

thanks guys!  ;)
Best,

JD

--Harley Davidson is king when it comes to turning gas into smoke, without the outcome of power--

Offline Baggerjohn

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2017, 06:22:38 pm »
Is the front axle hollow?

Yes?

Get yourself a 2ft length of aluminum round stock, of a diameter that just passes through the axle without binding. Put bike on centerstand, pass round stock through the axle then weight the back of the bike enough to raise the front wheel off the ground. A pair of jack stands can then support both ends of the round stock.

You can also support the front end sans wheel by this method, using stock that's a close fit into the axle recesses of the forks.

Offline JTX

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2017, 07:46:30 pm »
Guys, this post interests me quite a bit because I need to keep the front tire in the air over the winter, and I don't have a front lift (100 bucks). I'm thinking about getting 2x4 wood pieces to put under the front forks, but first I need to jack the front up. Where do you place the jack to lift the front? There's plastics everywhere, needless to say I don't want to break anything.

thanks guys!  ;)


The KAW Book says to raise it with a scissor jack under the oil pan or what the bottom of the engine is that sticks out below the plastics. And thats where I lift it with a piece of wood with whatever jack I have.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2017, 07:50:11 pm by JTX »

Offline Jerdurr

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2017, 07:54:58 pm »
Guys, this post interests me quite a bit because I need to keep the front tire in the air over the winter, and I don't have a front lift (100 bucks). I'm thinking about getting 2x4 wood pieces to put under the front forks, but first I need to jack the front up. Where do you place the jack to lift the front? There's plastics everywhere, needless to say I don't want to break anything.

thanks guys!  ;)


The KAW Book says to raise it with a scissor jack under the oil pan or what the bottom of the engine is that sticks out below the plastics. And thats where I lift it with a piece of wood with whatever jack I have.

I didn't think the oil pan was sturdy enough to withstand that pressure, but if it's in the book, I'll trust it!

Is the front axle hollow?

Yes?

Get yourself a 2ft length of aluminum round stock, of a diameter that just passes through the axle without binding. Put bike on centerstand, pass round stock through the axle then weight the back of the bike enough to raise the front wheel off the ground. A pair of jack stands can then support both ends of the round stock.

You can also support the front end sans wheel by this method, using stock that's a close fit into the axle recesses of the forks.

appreciate your input.... i'm sure the sarcasm wasn't necessary though.
Thanks again.
Best,

JD

--Harley Davidson is king when it comes to turning gas into smoke, without the outcome of power--

Offline worncog

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2017, 12:22:50 am »
Some interesting ideas.

I use this one in my shop and on the lift. Solid, large footprint, no hydraulics. Have had zero issues with it in over a year of regular use. YMMV

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1100-LB-Motorcycle-Dirt-Bike-ATV-Scissor-Center-Jack-Mini-Lift-Crank-Floor-Stand-/181935108965?hash=item2a5c2d7365
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Offline rcannon409

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #13 on: November 29, 2017, 01:48:19 pm »
I had a flat tire, on my 14,  near a small town.  There was no way to get  a new tire, so I had to have it patched.  No motorcycle shop, so I had to remove the front tire, myself.

I carried the tools to do this, but obviously had no stand.....or, did I?

I put the bike on its center stand, and grabbed a ratchet strap.  One end of the ratchet strap went to my luggage rack, the other to a freeway guard rail.

I put enough tension on the strap to just raise the front wheel of the ground, and removed my wheel.

The bike was stable, and i've done this same thing in my garage, without issues. Its actually way easier than using my Pit Bill front stand, and its not in the way.

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Offline JTX

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2017, 01:55:10 pm »
I had a flat tire, on my 14,  near a small town.  There was no way to get  a new tire, so I had to have it patched.  No motorcycle shop, so I had to remove the front tire, myself.

I carried the tools to do this, but obviously had no stand.....or, did I?

I put the bike on its center stand, and grabbed a ratchet strap.  One end of the ratchet strap went to my luggage rack, the other to a freeway guard rail.

I put enough tension on the strap to just raise the front wheel of the ground, and removed my wheel.

The bike was stable, and i've done this same thing in my garage, without issues. Its actually way easier than using my Pit Bill front stand, and its not in the way.


Yup.  Or have someone hold the back down, too.  Thats a lot of work on the road side!!


I keep those long strip style patches with me but I wouldnt take the tire off to use it. Just poke it through and air it up and off to the tire shop.




Offline rcannon409

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #15 on: November 29, 2017, 02:10:42 pm »
I have a smaller toolbox that weighs around 75-80 lbs...often times, I use it as my weight..then, a ratchet strap to its handle from my luggage rack.

This roadside incident prompted me to start carrying a slime compressor and some plugs.

I'll never miss an opportunity to learn soemthign the hard way!
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Offline JTX

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2017, 11:49:39 am »
I have a smaller toolbox that weighs around 75-80 lbs...often times, I use it as my weight..then, a ratchet strap to its handle from my luggage rack.

This roadside incident prompted me to start carrying a slime compressor and some plugs.

I'll never miss an opportunity to learn soemthign the hard way!



I've even used the strips





....image for reference for those that dont know






in my car. I keep a tire repair kit in my car so that I can repair a tire in an emergency and I actually just used one last week on the wife's Camry.  Good thing its almost time for tires anyway.  I used one of these and so far so good no leaks. I didn't need any glue either.  I've used these on bike tires before too and have never needed glue.


I've been very fortunate over the years and had very few bike tire punctures but I Always keep this kit with the handles and a razor, air plump in my saddle bag.  Plus you don't have to take the tire off.



Offline Baggerjohn

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #17 on: November 30, 2017, 01:34:30 pm »
appreciate your input.... i'm sure the sarcasm wasn't necessary though.
No sarcasm intended. I haven't looked through either of mine lately to be sure.  :))

Offline ron203

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2017, 01:56:41 pm »
I wish Slime would change their packaging so that when you open a multi-pack, each one is individually wrapped like "string cheese." When I open the pack, I wonder how long the glue will be good for after that even if I reseal it with tape and put it in a bag. I eventually toss the pack and buy a new one. Seems like cheap insurance.
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Offline JTX

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #19 on: November 30, 2017, 02:04:09 pm »
I wish Slime would change their packaging so that when you open a multi-pack, each one is individually wrapped like "string cheese." When I open the pack, I wonder how long the glue will be good for after that even if I reseal it with tape and put it in a bag. I eventually toss the pack and buy a new one. Seems like cheap insurance.


For the glue,  it's a one-time-use the way I see it.  Maybe a single-roadtrip.  But once you open those containers, it'll harden over time,  get a new one.


For the strips, I've kept them for a couple years with no issues.  I think if you inspect them and they are sticky still, It should work fine.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 02:08:26 pm by JTX »

Offline ron203

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2017, 02:10:54 pm »
Yep, that's about my procedure. Keep it until my conscience bothers me and pitch it.  ;D
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Offline JTX

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Re: Scissors jack
« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2017, 02:12:17 pm »
Yep, that's about my procedure. Keep it until my conscience bothers me and pitch it.  ;D


Absolutely.  This stuff is cheap.  If it loses its sticky texture when you go on a big ride,  get new ones.