Author Topic: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.  (Read 7762 times)

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Offline sfsokc

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #25 on: April 13, 2012, 03:14:01 pm »
Seeing that folks actually CAN drag a peg (or come close to it) actually reassures me, even though I've never done that.  I still would like to try a track school one of these days, but for now, just trying to improve my street safety (reading David Hough's books).  I've managed to get the chicken strips down to about 1/2 inch, but still feel like I'm nowhere near dragging a peg!  (wonder if I am?)  In any case, here's the big question--for you folks that ARE doing that, I don't imagine it's on the STOCK tires now is it? 

Offline Kinetic1

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2012, 04:02:40 pm »
I've drug my pegs on the stock stones on accident. On a freeway cloverleaf on ramp of all places. They feel horrible and don't hold a line worth a toot but they are still better than the tires I used to race on in the early 90's. The DOT's I ran were considered one of the best at the time (Pirelli MP7's) and the stones offer more grip than they did, I'm sure of it. 
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Offline Jeremy

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2012, 04:56:38 pm »
A couple from my trip to the Dragon last fall.



I love a good "upskirt shot"   ;D







I ended up tickling more than the peg.


I have since learned alot more about how much body positioning can affect ground clearance.  I rarely even touch a peg anymore.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 05:00:42 pm by Jeremy »
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Offline Stewart

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2012, 05:31:19 pm »
I have since learned alot more about how much body positioning can affect ground clearance.  I rarely even touch a peg anymore.

Bingo, I learnt that too at my track day, touch pegs less often. As for touching body work, wow...never would have thought.

As for the upskirt photo...as sexy as the new Ducati Panigale if you ask me.
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Offline Trouble

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2012, 05:43:33 pm »
A couple from my trip to the Dragon last fall.



I love a good "upskirt shot"   ;D







I ended up tickling more than the peg.


I have since learned alot more about how much body positioning can affect ground clearance.  I rarely even touch a peg anymore.




That's DAM AUSSOME Dude !  Now THAT"S what im talking about .  Now imagine if you were laying into it...or better known as knee dragging.    :beerchug:
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Offline Trouble

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2012, 05:50:19 pm »
Seeing that folks actually CAN drag a peg (or come close to it) actually reassures me, even though I've never done that.  I still would like to try a track school one of these days, but for now, just trying to improve my street safety (reading David Hough's books).  I've managed to get the chicken strips down to about 1/2 inch, but still feel like I'm nowhere near dragging a peg!  (wonder if I am?)  In any case, here's the big question--for you folks that ARE doing that, I don't imagine it's on the STOCK tires now is it?


OK ! Here's some helpful hints. First, Dump the OEM tires. I have Michelin power 2CT . And yes they STICK ! Dam good. Second, you HAVE to do something with the connie suspension. it sucks and unless you weigh 150 lbs, it's set totally wrong. The sag is supposed to be around 30mm. I weigh 200  and 6tft 2 tall. I had to jack my shocks totally down to get 30mm. BUT I noticed I had a lot more ground clearance around curves. I held my line much better and the feel is in much more control .  I've drug my pegs till the little knob on the end is not there anymore. I lean with my bike just as if I was racing. it gives me much more stability and ground clearence. then if I hear my pegs grinding, I know to lean my butt off the seat a little more. We're heading to track day in Nola with the Connie. it should prove to be a blast. Im going to try and get a video and post it on here for everyone.

Hope this helps you in some way
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Offline Kinetic1

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #31 on: April 13, 2012, 07:04:20 pm »
Great shots and great riding Jeremy.  8)
"I never did mind much about the little things"

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #32 on: April 13, 2012, 08:10:54 pm »
Seeing that folks actually CAN drag a peg (or come close to it) actually reassures me, even though I've never done that.  I still would like to try a track school one of these days, but for now, just trying to improve my street safety (reading David Hough's books).  I've managed to get the chicken strips down to about 1/2 inch, but still feel like I'm nowhere near dragging a peg!  (wonder if I am?)  In any case, here's the big question--for you folks that ARE doing that, I don't imagine it's on the STOCK tires now is it?


OK ! Here's some helpful hints. First, Dump the OEM tires. I have Michelin power 2CT . And yes they STICK ! Dam good. Second, you HAVE to do something with the connie suspension. it sucks and unless you weigh 150 lbs, it's set totally wrong. The sag is supposed to be around 30mm. I weigh 200  and 6tft 2 tall. I had to jack my shocks totally down to get 30mm. BUT I noticed I had a lot more ground clearance around curves. I held my line much better and the feel is in much more control .  I've drug my pegs till the little knob on the end is not there anymore. I lean with my bike just as if I was racing. it gives me much more stability and ground clearence. then if I hear my pegs grinding, I know to lean my butt off the seat a little more. We're heading to track day in Nola with the Connie. it should prove to be a blast. Im going to try and get a video and post it on here for everyone.

Hope this helps you in some way

Wow, yes! Thanks for that narrative. I'm heading to the Gap in July, but no $ for a tire swap, I'll just take'er easy, Deals Gap is only a small part of our planned excursion, gotta remember to not end up in an emergency room or the Wife will put the nix on pretty much everything else. Been there, done that on my old dual-sport. Snatched my right bicep tendon right off the bone on an old KLR250. Took me a couple years to convince her to let me get a DR650. I ride Adventure (ADV) mostly on that, so I tend to keep out of trouble! lol

Offline sfsokc

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #33 on: April 13, 2012, 09:48:30 pm »
"Second, you HAVE to do something with the connie suspension. it sucks and unless you weigh 150 lbs, it's set totally wrong. The sag is supposed to be around 30mm. I weigh 200  and 6tft 2 tall. I had to jack my shocks totally down to get 30mm. BUT I noticed I had a lot more ground clearance around curves"

So then, how many "clicks" out counterclockwise from fully in (or highest preload) is that?

Offline Jeremy

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #34 on: April 14, 2012, 03:34:59 am »
My Penske shock has made a huge difference in the ride and handling of my C14.  Next on my list is a re-valve of my fork through Ohlins.
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Offline TGE

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #35 on: April 14, 2012, 04:46:14 am »
Suspension and tires are actually much more closely allied than most people assume. With a poorly set up suspension, much of the impacts from the road surface are transferred to the tires, which in turn can cause poor traction and inconsistent feedback from the tires. Unfortunately for many of us, stock suspensions on the vast majority of motorcycles consist of budget-quality parts that are designed for riders with physical attributes that do not match the majority of real life people.

A suitable solution for this problem is to have the bike set up specifically to your physical attributes. You can actually do this yourself (Lee Parks' book has a good chapter on this), or have your local suspension guru (commonly found as vendors at track days or local races) set it up for you. A lot of riders are convinced (as was I) that we can come close to properly setting up the suspension ourselves, simply by tooling with the settings and making changes after each ride. In reality, that is rarely the case. One of the first things that experienced track riders recommend to riders that are new to the track is to get their suspension set up by a qualified person. The difference that this makes is worth many times the $30-40 dollars that it costs to get this done.  True suspensions mods are great, but they are really only required once the properly set up stock suspension is deemed unsuitable for your weight and riding style. For instance, I weigh roughly 190-lbs plus gear, and have found the stock suspension on the C-14 to be quite suitable for spirited riding - once it was properly set up. The bike now feels firm and planted in the turns, and I would have little hesitation in taking her to the track. This obviously does not mean that it is perfect or that people who are upgrading it are wasting their time and money - it just means that in my case, it is quite able to handle what I tend to throw at her. Your mileage may vary.

As far as the tires are concerned, that aspect is best evaluated once the suspension is properly set up and the rider's form has received a bit of coaching. There is an obvious trade-off between traction and longevity, and every single tire model represents a compromise between those two variables. Ultimately, the best tires for an individual rider are the ones that are the most confidence-inspiring. In my experience, the Michelin Pilot Power series (Pilot Power, Pilot Power 2CT, Pilot Pure, Power One, and the new Power Cup) are excellent tires for both the street and the track, although they are all strongly skewed toward traction, rather than longevity. Dunlop's Q2 also fall into that category - fantastic grip, at the cost of longevity. If you go to a track day, most of the street riders (beginner & intermediate group) will likely run either one of the aforementioned Michelin tires or the Dunlop Q2. You can easily throw them on the C-14, but obviously they will not nearly get the mileage of a touring tire. For a tire that is more skewed towards longevity while still providing lots of grip, I have had really good experience with Pirelli Angel ST. 
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Offline AhhhhhSUM

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #36 on: April 14, 2012, 05:36:50 am »
Jeremy, those pics are just sick!   I would have never imagined the fairing to get scraped...wow....lol.

Offline Trouble

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #37 on: April 14, 2012, 10:48:18 am »
Suspension and tires are actually much more closely allied than most people assume. With a poorly set up suspension, much of the impacts from the road surface are transferred to the tires, which in turn can cause poor traction and inconsistent feedback from the tires. Unfortunately for many of us, stock suspensions on the vast majority of motorcycles consist of budget-quality parts that are designed for riders with physical attributes that do not match the majority of real life people.

A suitable solution for this problem is to have the bike set up specifically to your physical attributes. You can actually do this yourself (Lee Parks' book has a good chapter on this), or have your local suspension guru (commonly found as vendors at track days or local races) set it up for you. A lot of riders are convinced (as was I) that we can come close to properly setting up the suspension ourselves, simply by tooling with the settings and making changes after each ride. In reality, that is rarely the case. One of the first things that experienced track riders recommend to riders that are new to the track is to get their suspension set up by a qualified person. The difference that this makes is worth many times the $30-40 dollars that it costs to get this done.  True suspensions mods are great, but they are really only required once the properly set up stock suspension is deemed unsuitable for your weight and riding style. For instance, I weigh roughly 190-lbs plus gear, and have found the stock suspension on the C-14 to be quite suitable for spirited riding - once it was properly set up. The bike now feels firm and planted in the turns, and I would have little hesitation in taking her to the track. This obviously does not mean that it is perfect or that people who are upgrading it are wasting their time and money - it just means that in my case, it is quite able to handle what I tend to throw at her. Your mileage may vary.

As far as the tires are concerned, that aspect is best evaluated once the suspension is properly set up and the rider's form has received a bit of coaching. There is an obvious trade-off between traction and longevity, and every single tire model represents a compromise between those two variables. Ultimately, the best tires for an individual rider are the ones that are the most confidence-inspiring. In my experience, the Michelin Pilot Power series (Pilot Power, Pilot Power 2CT, Pilot Pure, Power One, and the new Power Cup) are excellent tires for both the street and the track, although they are all strongly skewed toward traction, rather than longevity. Dunlop's Q2 also fall into that category - fantastic grip, at the cost of longevity. If you go to a track day, most of the street riders (beginner & intermediate group) will likely run either one of the aforementioned Michelin tires or the Dunlop Q2. You can easily throw them on the C-14, but obviously they will not nearly get the mileage of a touring tire. For a tire that is more skewed towards longevity while still providing lots of grip, I have had really good experience with Pirelli Angel ST.


DUDE ! I ate two Perilli Angel's off my bike in less than 3K miles. In my humble opinion the Mechilen power 2CT's are the Best all around tire  if your going to do hard twisties or track day. Drop the PSI to 32 and the grip is amazing. The suspension on the connie sucks and you pretty well know it if you've tried to set it. Barely adequate in my opinion.  I weigh 195 to 200 lbs . But I think you are right about the average rider and the suspension. Im going to have mine rebuilt soon. It still feels firm and planted in curves but I can feel every pebble in the road. lol

Good write up. Would like to ride with you some time
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Offline jetman

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #38 on: April 15, 2012, 01:05:43 am »
OK, Jeremy, I'll bite: what kind of tires are you sporting in the photos? Very impressive lean angles, sir.

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #39 on: April 15, 2012, 01:08:50 am »
Look like Michelin PR or Avon Storms to me.  Either one will getcha there.  Pretty sure they're Michelins.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2012, 01:13:25 am by Rev Ryder »
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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #40 on: April 15, 2012, 01:11:30 am »
OK, Jeremy, I'll bite: what kind of tires are you sporting in the photos? Very impressive lean angles, sir.

I dunno, but I foresee a Crazy Glue ad in his near future! lol

Offline Jeremy

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #41 on: April 15, 2012, 03:14:04 am »
OK, Jeremy, I'll bite: what kind of tires are you sporting in the photos? Very impressive lean angles, sir.
Michelin PR2's is what I had at that time.  I am running Pirelli Angels right and they feel a little better than the PR2/PR3's that I have run.  I'm just not sure if they will last as long.
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Offline TGE

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #42 on: April 16, 2012, 02:08:59 am »
For those who are interested in proper body position, this image provides a nice overview. I don't remember where I got this from, otherwise I would have provided credit. For a given turn, the proper body position allows the rider to use less lean angle, and thus provides more traction, which allows you to take it at a higher speed.



DUDE ! I ate two Perilli Angel's off my bike in less than 3K miles. In my humble opinion the Mechilen power 2CT's are the Best all around tire  if your going to do hard twisties or track day. Drop the PSI to 32 and the grip is amazing. The suspension on the connie sucks and you pretty well know it if you've tried to set it. Barely adequate in my opinion.  I weigh 195 to 200 lbs . But I think you are right about the average rider and the suspension. Im going to have mine rebuilt soon. It still feels firm and planted in curves but I can feel every pebble in the road. lol

Good write up. Would like to ride with you some time


Yeah, the combination of sport tires with low tire pressures (32 PSI on PP 2CTs is track-worthy) on a heavy bike with a 1.4 L engine doesn't exactly equal longevity. But - if serious grip for aggressive canyon carving is what you're after, the 2CTs or Q2s easily fit the bill. You can run the 2CTs at 34f/34r without losing too much grip, by the way.

Always ready to ride! If you're ever coming through North Texas, feel free to holla. Not exactly the most twisty state, but at least it doesn't get too hot. Oh wait...  ;D
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Offline Trouble

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #43 on: April 16, 2012, 07:24:48 pm »
For those who are interested in proper body position, this image provides a nice overview. I don't remember where I got this from, otherwise I would have provided credit. For a given turn, the proper body position allows the rider to use less lean angle, and thus provides more traction, which allows you to take it at a higher speed.



DUDE ! I ate two Perilli Angel's off my bike in less than 3K miles. In my humble opinion the Mechilen power 2CT's are the Best all around tire  if your going to do hard twisties or track day. Drop the PSI to 32 and the grip is amazing. The suspension on the connie sucks and you pretty well know it if you've tried to set it. Barely adequate in my opinion.  I weigh 195 to 200 lbs . But I think you are right about the average rider and the suspension. Im going to have mine rebuilt soon. It still feels firm and planted in curves but I can feel every pebble in the road. lol

Good write up. Would like to ride with you some time


Yeah, the combination of sport tires with low tire pressures (32 PSI on PP 2CTs is track-worthy) on a heavy bike with a 1.4 L engine doesn't exactly equal longevity. But - if serious grip for aggressive canyon carving is what you're after, the 2CTs or Q2s easily fit the bill. You can run the 2CTs at 34f/34r without losing too much grip, by the way.

Always ready to ride! If you're ever coming through North Texas, feel free to holla. Not exactly the most twisty state, but at least it doesn't get too hot. Oh wait...  ;D



Thank you for that information . Very informative . But I noticed on your profile pic you laying down on the tank .   :-)
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Offline TGE

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #44 on: April 16, 2012, 10:35:22 pm »
Quote
Thank you for that information . Very informative . But I noticed on your profile pic you laying down on the tank .   :-)

lol - I'm actually positioning my upper body to the inside of the bike. Laying on the tank refers to lowering your upper body while sitting centered on/in line with the bike. In fact, in fast turns your upper body and head should get really low, but always to the inside of the bike.

By the way, I apologize to the OP for hijacking this thread. I just felt that some may be interested in learning about proper body positions.
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Offline Trouble

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #45 on: April 17, 2012, 01:33:10 am »
Quote
Thank you for that information . Very informative . But I noticed on your profile pic you laying down on the tank .   :-)

lol - I'm actually positioning my upper body to the inside of the bike. Laying on the tank refers to lowering your upper body while sitting centered on/in line with the bike. In fact, in fast turns your upper body and head should get really low, but always to the inside of the bike.

By the way, I apologize to the OP for hijacking this thread. I just felt that some may be interested in learning about proper body positions.

Oh PLEASE ! Continue  . I love learning
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Offline DanL

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #46 on: April 17, 2012, 11:14:12 am »
A couple from my trip to the Dragon last fall.



I love a good "upskirt shot"   ;D







I ended up tickling more than the peg.


I have since learned alot more about how much body positioning can affect ground clearance.  I rarely even touch a peg anymore.


Jeremy how fast were you going there, do you have an idea?

I'm going to do my 1st Dragon run this summer. My wife has been 2x on her Vulcan and she says I'm going to love the area and that I'm going to have a blast on my bike.

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #47 on: April 17, 2012, 06:48:22 pm »

Jeremy how fast were you going there, do you have an idea?

I'm going to do my 1st Dragon run this summer. My wife has been 2x on her Vulcan and she says I'm going to love the area and that I'm going to have a blast on my bike.

I was running "quick enough" for my ability.  I ran it three times that afternoon and felt more confident each time.  I would suggest that you take it easy to get a feel for it since there are a couple corners that can sneak up on you very easily. 
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Offline DanL

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #48 on: April 18, 2012, 02:51:27 am »
I'll most definitely take it easy and run it a few times to get used to it. I was curious if you remembered how fast you were going- not that I'd try to run it that fast if you said you were going 50 or something!

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Re: Tickling a foot peg on the Connie.
« Reply #49 on: April 18, 2012, 01:46:32 pm »
I'll most definitely take it easy and run it a few times to get used to it. I was curious if you remembered how fast you were going- not that I'd try to run it that fast if you said you were going 50 or something!

Average speed for the entire 11 miles (according to my GPS) was 45.2 mph.  It sure felt alot faster than that.
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