Author Topic: TPMS  (Read 1105 times)

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Offline creo50

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TPMS
« on: May 20, 2019, 01:15:54 am »
I have a 2008 Concours14. I have had the bike for a couple years. The tire pressure monitor batteries are low in both tires and have been for two years. On the 08 do you just replace the batteries or the whole sensor? Will it ever ever ever stop flashing on the screen that the batteries are low?
Thanks
2008 C14

Offline Mabupa

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2019, 02:11:22 am »
There are instructions on how to open the sensors on the early model C14 to replace the batteries, but is not as simple as changing the batteries on your TV’s remote, people simply found a work around to save money and not have to buy new sensors.

Offline TimR

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2019, 02:52:19 am »
If you can stand to be out of a bike for a week, pull your sensors (if the stems are completely round, If there are flats in the stem you might be sol) Assuming the stems on a 09 are round, pull your sensors marking which is front and which is rear. Get a hold of Fred Harmon and send them to him for batteries.


When replaced I aired my tires up to 42 lbs. using a elec. pressure gauge. First time I pilled away a few feet later both sensors read 42 lbs.  I had not ever had both sensors read the same pressure before. Then after the tires are warmed up they both read the same. I don't know if they can be adjusted but the sensors do appear to work better.


It's nice to have them working again. 
Blue 1975 Z1B 900, Red 09 C14     I might not be perfect but at least I don't ride a Suzuki

Offline agosey

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2019, 08:20:23 pm »
Creo50-

I also have an 08 and it was about this time last year that one of my batteries shot craps. I used Fred Harmon's instructions found here:
http://forum.cog-online.org/concours-14-zg1400-general-chat-and-tech/better-replacement-tpms-batteries/msg420263/#msg420263

I found the same battery on Digi-Key that he referenced in the beginning of the thread. Wish I would have needed to change tires at the same time, but no. So I half un-mounted each tire so I could get to each wheels TPMS. I noted the unit number on the label of each one and wrote it with a black sharpie on the inside of the wheel so I wouldn't swap them inadvertently. I also traced around them in sharpie before removing them, just in case there was some directionality to the sensor vs the rotation as a CYA.

After that it was pretty straight forward with the removal of the old and soldering new ones, and I'm not very good at it. Re-installed them in their respective wheels, and all was good. Totally doable. Hope that helps.
2008 ZG1400B, 2005 Ural Patrol, 1976 GL1000
Gone but not forgotten, 2006 DL1000k6, 2007 VN900b

Offline Fred_Wa2gzw

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2019, 12:28:50 am »
Here is a YouTube Link to the process.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTXTz2pBzR4&t=287s

I DO NOT RECOMMEND SOLDERING Directly to the battery!! 

Buy Batteries with Tabs and you should be able to solder one lead directly and use a short length of light weight wire (24 Ga.) to connect the other side.  It should take less that 10 minutes to complete once the tire is off the bike. 

When disassembling the TPMS there is a small Philips screw underneath the white tag that needs to be removed to split the case.  The white tag has the number needed if for some reason the TPMS has to be programmed to the bike.  It is probably a good idea to take a picture of it and record the number somewhere safe.   I have never heard of anyone needing to do that but better be safe than sorry.  The hex allan nut that is connected thru the TPMS and goes to the tire filler is aluminum so make sure that you are fully seated before attempting removal so that you do not destroy it.

There are other folks that are able to deflate the tire while its on the bike and using a couple of clamps and boards they compress the tire and are able to get to the TPMS without removing the wheel them from the bike.


Good Luck,

Fred_Wa2gzw

Offline creo50

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2019, 01:19:57 am »
Thanks for the replies. If I never change the sensor or battery will it ever quite flashing low battery on the display? As nice as it would be to have them working I really don't care if they ever work again I just want it to quite flashing on the display.
2008 C14

Offline agosey

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2019, 06:00:45 pm »
...will it ever quite flashing low battery on the display? ...I really don't care if they ever work again I just want it to quite flashing on the display.

When the Battery goes completely dead I believe it will stop flashing. I considered it, but then I though about the times that by having it I had warning that something was wrong with by tires (nail in front and 1000 pinholes in the rear). By seeing the pressure dropping I was able to pull over before I had a high speed flat and lose control or get stranded. Given the little amount of work and the time in between replacements (8 or 9 years) I figured it was totally worth it. To each his own though.
2008 ZG1400B, 2005 Ural Patrol, 1976 GL1000
Gone but not forgotten, 2006 DL1000k6, 2007 VN900b

Offline Phil

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2019, 06:10:20 pm »
Given the little amount of work and the time in between replacements (8 or 9 years) I figured it was totally worth it. To each his own though.

Considering mine have been replaced three times in less than nine years, your math may be off.  :))

If Kawasaki had not designed the dash warning the way they did, I might like the sensors better, but when the battery is, "low," it hijacks the dash. Very annoying, especially considering the warning comes about 18 months before the battery actually dies. I currently have one that is giving the low battery warning, and it has been for over a year. I can get it replaced under warranty, as long as I do it before my warranty is up the middle of Jun, but quite frankly, I am seriously considering letting it die. I doubt I will replace them once they die outside of warranty, and having grown up before sensors existed, I am fully happy not having them. Their usefulness is greatly exaggerated if you ask me.

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2019, 06:51:03 pm »
Given the little amount of work and the time in between replacements (8 or 9 years) I figured it was totally worth it. To each his own though.

Considering mine have been replaced three times in less than nine years, your math may be off.  :))

....having grown up before sensors existed, I am fully happy not having them. Their usefulness is greatly exaggerated if you ask me.

 :)) :)) :)) :truce: :rotflmao: :rotflmao: :rotflmao:

I've heard people say this before, and unless the sensor warned you at least once of a pending flat tire in BFE...  I guess I can understand your statement;
But I don't think you will find anyone, that has had the warning save them, at least once, or a couple times, say their usefulness is exaggerated... ;)

ride safe, carry a tire plug kit, a pump, and emergency reflectors... and a flashlight...   and a chargecard, and cell phone.
 :great: :motonoises: :motonoises:

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Offline Fred_Wa2gzw

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2019, 01:11:25 pm »
Thanks for the replies. If I never change the sensor or battery will it ever quite flashing low battery on the display? As nice as it would be to have them working I really don't care if they ever work again I just want it to quite flashing on the display.


The flashing can be turned off easily by just pushing the Upper and lower buttons simultaneously.  You will have to do this every time you start the bike or it will resume flashing. 

Offline Phil

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2019, 05:53:20 pm »
Given the little amount of work and the time in between replacements (8 or 9 years) I figured it was totally worth it. To each his own though.

Considering mine have been replaced three times in less than nine years, your math may be off.  :))

....having grown up before sensors existed, I am fully happy not having them. Their usefulness is greatly exaggerated if you ask me.

 :)) :)) :)) :truce: :rotflmao: :rotflmao: :rotflmao:

I've heard people say this before, and unless the sensor warned you at least once of a pending flat tire in BFE...  I guess I can understand your statement;
But I don't think you will find anyone, that has had the warning save them, at least once, or a couple times, say their usefulness is exaggerated... ;)

ride safe, carry a tire plug kit, a pump, and emergency reflectors... and a flashlight...   and a chargecard, and cell phone.
 :great: :motonoises: :motonoises:

In the hundreds of thousands of miles I have ridden on motorcycles on trips all over, I have yet to be stranded because of a tire problem. Not that I haven't had a leak before, but nothing that stranded me. Even if I had one, over the course of the last 40 odd years, I would hardly say that it warrants being so worried about not having TPMS. In the years I have had TPMS on cars and on the bike, the only warning I have ever gotten from them, was related to the sensor itself, costing me money to replace them, rather than a tire. I have more money in sensors than it would cost to replace a tire, bike or car. So if a sensor only has given me warnings about the sensor itself, and that has cost money, what is the benefit? Can it help? Sure. DO you regularly check your pressure with a gauge? I do, every time I ride more than a quick trip around town, and even then I check them often.

So no, I do not see a huge benefit. If you do, great. I just get more warnings about the sensors themselves than a low tire pressure warning, in fact, when I did have a puncture, and resulting leak, I caught it, each time, before the sensor did, so...

Offline Russ

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #11 on: May 22, 2019, 06:45:20 pm »
The batteries with tabs are P668-ND from Digikey - almost a perfect fit.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/panasonic-bsg/CR-2032L-F1N/P668-ND/2415266

And for those lucky enough to never loose a front tire at speed, find some wood to knock on.  A small piece of bone went into the front tire on my old VT750 ACE.  By the time I noticed it getting low (Well within two minutes of hitting a rabbit carcass) it was nearly uncontrollable and was all I could do to get it stopped safely.  One minute it was fine and the next minute I was doing an emergency stop. 

Am I going to add them to my other bike?  Probably not... But I will keep them operational on a bike that see's 80+ MPH for hours and long trips into other parts of the country.  The Vegas hasnt left the county since I bought it. 

Your results may vary ;)






« Last Edit: May 22, 2019, 07:07:10 pm by Russ »

08 C14
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SOLD - 06 KLR650, 04 VT1100 Spirit, 01 VT750 ACE, 1986 VFR750F, 1991 CBR1000F
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Offline Phil

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2019, 06:35:36 pm »
The batteries with tabs are P668-ND from Digikey - almost a perfect fit.

https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/panasonic-bsg/CR-2032L-F1N/P668-ND/2415266

And for those lucky enough to never loose a front tire at speed, find some wood to knock on.  A small piece of bone went into the front tire on my old VT750 ACE.  By the time I noticed it getting low (Well within two minutes of hitting a rabbit carcass) it was nearly uncontrollable and was all I could do to get it stopped safely.  One minute it was fine and the next minute I was doing an emergency stop. 

Am I going to add them to my other bike?  Probably not... But I will keep them operational on a bike that see's 80+ MPH for hours and long trips into other parts of the country.  The Vegas hasnt left the county since I bought it. 

Your results may vary ;)

Your VT750 ACE had tube type tires, completely different story. When the tube goes, all your air goes quickly. A tubeless tire like what is on the Concours will not have a catastrophic loss of air like a tube type tire does. Even if it did, with a catastrophic air loss, a TPMS wouldn't help you anyway, it would give the warning at the same time.

Offline Russ

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #13 on: May 23, 2019, 07:00:28 pm »
Not arguing with you Phil, it's a feature on my bike that I happen to like a lot.  I'll keep it active. 

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Offline Phil

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2019, 04:05:07 pm »
Not arguing with you Phil, it's a feature on my bike that I happen to like a lot.  I'll keep it active.

Absolutely nothing wrong with that. If the TPMS didn't hijack the dash when the battery was, "low," and begin doing that about a year before it dies, I wouldn't mind them. For me, they have become an annoyance. Actually mine have been sporadically giving the low battery warning for two years, beginning at first only at colder temperatures, now more frequently. Had Kawasaki designed the warning differently, I wouldn't mind them.

Offline Road Runner

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2019, 01:49:00 am »
Not arguing with you Phil, it's a feature on my bike that I happen to like a lot.  I'll keep it active.

Absolutely nothing wrong with that. If the TPMS didn't hijack the dash when the battery was, "low," and begin doing that about a year before it dies, I wouldn't mind them. For me, they have become an annoyance. Actually mine have been sporadically giving the low battery warning for two years, beginning at first only at colder temperatures, now more frequently. Had Kawasaki designed the warning differently, I wouldn't mind them.

I'm with you on this; annoying, but Kawasaki assumes we'll follow-up w/ a battery change.
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Offline Steve

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2019, 05:39:02 pm »
That is my video  :great:

Here is a YouTube Link to the process.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTXTz2pBzR4&t=287s


I DO NOT RECOMMEND SOLDERING Directly to the battery!! 

Buy Batteries with Tabs and you should be able to solder one lead directly and use a short length of light weight wire (24 Ga.) to connect the other side.  It should take less that 10 minutes to complete once the tire is off the bike. 

When disassembling the TPMS there is a small Philips screw underneath the white tag that needs to be removed to split the case.  The white tag has the number needed if for some reason the TPMS has to be programmed to the bike.  It is probably a good idea to take a picture of it and record the number somewhere safe.   I have never heard of anyone needing to do that but better be safe than sorry.  The hex allan nut that is connected thru the TPMS and goes to the tire filler is aluminum so make sure that you are fully seated before attempting removal so that you do not destroy it.

There are other folks that are able to deflate the tire while its on the bike and using a couple of clamps and boards they compress the tire and are able to get to the TPMS without removing the wheel them from the bike.


Good Luck,

Fred_Wa2gzw

Offline Chris

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2019, 01:10:48 pm »
Hello.  New to group, just picked up a 2011 C-14 and am loving it.  I have the low battery warning as well, but I have external sensors.  Never seen them before and can't get a pic to upload, but they basically screw onto the valve stem and look like a 2 in finger or wand.  Tire pressure works accurately, but getting the error message and tired of bypassing it.  Not a lot to go on, wish I could get the pic to upload, but any thoughts out there? Are external sensors a typical conversion?

Thanks,
--Chris
1994 RF900r
2011 Concours 14

Offline TimR

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2019, 05:21:20 pm »
Quote
I'm with you on this; annoying, but Kawasaki assumes we'll follow-up w/ a battery change.


I don't think Kawasaki was planning on battery changes but rather sensor changes. The sensors were never meant to have the batteries changed and designed as a consumable. Enterprising COG members figured out how to change the batteries on the old sensors. Kawasaki saw $ leaving and the sensors were changed to a potted one.  Changing the battery in a potted sensor is extremely difficult. To keep the TP active a new sensor would be required along with shop time to address the new sensors with the computer. 

The only external TP sensors I am aware of is those that pair with a Garmin Zumo.  That's my story and I'm stickin to it.
Blue 1975 Z1B 900, Red 09 C14     I might not be perfect but at least I don't ride a Suzuki

Offline Russ

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2019, 03:00:46 pm »
Quote
The only external TP sensors I am aware of is those that pair with a Garmin Zumo.  That's my story and I'm stickin to it.

And changing the batteries in those sensors will not get rid of the annoying messages.

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Offline Kreton'sLC

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2019, 05:08:16 pm »
Thanks for the replies. If I never change the sensor or battery will it ever quite flashing low battery on the display? As nice as it would be to have them working I really don't care if they ever work again I just want it to quite flashing on the display.


The flashing can be turned off easily by just pushing the Upper and lower buttons simultaneously.  You will have to do this every time you start the bike or it will resume flashing.

Does this restore dash functionality as well?
2012 C14

Offline Freddy

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Re: TPMS
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2019, 10:21:37 pm »
Yes, until next start.
The best substitute for brains is ..............what?