Author Topic: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?  (Read 577 times)

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Offline Killface

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What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« on: October 04, 2018, 05:16:42 pm »
Hi. I'm planning a clutch job on my 2012 connie this winter. The service manual doesn't really clarify what exactly you should swap for new other than the clutch hub nut and, obviously. the friction plates and springs. Do I change steel plates as well just to be safe? Every other bike I've owned I just replaced the friction plates and springs but, the clutch assembly on the Connie is far more advanced than any of my other machines.

Offline Bud

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Re: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2018, 05:52:42 pm »
How many miles have you got on it?  For the time I've been around, I've not seen much about anyone replacing the clutch.  There has been quite a few threads about the clutch slave cylinder having moisture induced problems.  JustCliff has 200,000 miles on his and I don't remember anything about him replacing a clutch.  I could be wrong. 

Offline smithr1

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Re: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2018, 05:54:29 pm »
Never heard of one needing a clutch job but I'm not around as much as I use to be.  What is the symptoms?  May only need to make your hydraulics happy.  When was it bleed last?
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Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2018, 10:56:01 pm »
 :beer: :popcorncouple: :popcorncouple: :popcorncouple: :a012:

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW
and if you are gonna call me names... it's MR. Analdweeb if you please...

Offline JerBear

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Re: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2018, 07:45:41 pm »
My first thoughts too.  there have been a few issues with a broken star washer or one anyway.......  do a lot of drag strip 4k rpm starts?
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Offline cuda

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Re: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2018, 08:12:48 pm »
No man 6,000 rpm drop is the key.
We have invented the world WE see .
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Offline KnoxSwift

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Re: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2018, 09:51:45 pm »
Be sure to check which clutch plates your bike uses.
Kawasaki has 3 different sized steel plates based on VIN number.

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2018, 10:23:40 pm »
Be sure to check which clutch plates your bike uses.
Kawasaki has 3 different sized steel plates based on VIN number.

the steel plates have nothing to do with VIN... they differ by thickness...
the combinations are there to create the proper "stack height" during assembly, to allow correct function..

13089   13089-0018   PLATE-CLUTCH,T=2.6   8      
13089A   13089-0019   PLATE-CLUTCH,T=2.3   AR      
13089B   13089-0020   PLATE-CLUTCH,T=2.9   AR
as far as plates go, there is absolutely NO need to replace the steel ones unless the bike was SEVERELY abused, and they are extremely discolored, and or warped beyond spec... which I have never seen yet.

all that is needed are the fibre friction plates, and they must be assembled in specific sequence, per the FSM, and or the Microfich, they must also be 'pre-soaked' in the same oil you fill the tranny with, for about 6-24 hours, or at least a couple hours...
there are different numbered friction plates also, so be aware of that, it has to do with the splines, and keying of the outer diameter vs the inner diameter....
13088   13088-0031   PLATE-FRICTION   1   (outer plate only)   
13088A   13088-0033   PLATE-FRICTION   1   (inner plate only)   
13088B   13088-0037   PLATE-FRICTION   7      (remaing middle plates only)

My recommendation, if it IS NECESSARY to replace these, from abuse, is only use the OEM frictions, they are VERY consistent in manufacture, and as aftermarket plates often vary in thickness, and then it makes it necessary to start doing the complex, and painful stack height dimensions and measuring, which about 95% of 'home mechanics' will have difficulty with doing correctly... I also warn against replacing any of the clutch springs, as there are a number of them, and unless they don't measure up to the acceptable limits outlined in the FSM (again), it's wasted money, and effort.. and in the end, may give poorer clutch reliability then it originally had from the factory.

not to mention, there 18 of them... 6 on the outer plate, and 12 in the slipper....

92145   92145-0440   SPRING,15X2.7           6      
92145A   92145-0537   SPRING                  12

and now 4 starsprings, 2 pairs of each, stacked staggered, and correctly...
39130   39130-1078   SPRING-LEAF   2     (inner)   
39130A   39130-1079   SPRING-LEAF   2    (outer)

these clutches are extremely robust, changing them unless a catastrophic failure occurred, and just based on "I think I should do it, for no reason" doesn't make any sense.

if in doubt, add all those parts up... and be prepared for a shock... >:( :)) ;) ;) :rotflmao:

oops, forgot the gasket
11061B   11061-0810   GASKET,CLUTCH COVER   1


just for full effect... total of those parts comes to $343.31

friction plates only (which is all I would change) still runs $117.63

add oil...rags, sealants, and time...
« Last Edit: October 10, 2018, 11:16:57 pm by MAN OF BLUES »

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and if you are gonna call me names... it's MR. Analdweeb if you please...

Offline KnoxSwift

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Re: What's the standard practice for a clutch job?
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2018, 04:17:13 pm »
Be sure to check which clutch plates your bike uses.
Kawasaki has 3 different sized steel plates based on VIN number.

the steel plates have nothing to do with VIN... they differ by thickness...
the combinations are there to create the proper "stack height" during assembly, to allow correct function..

13089   13089-0018   PLATE-CLUTCH,T=2.6   8      
13089A   13089-0019   PLATE-CLUTCH,T=2.3   AR      
13089B   13089-0020   PLATE-CLUTCH,T=2.9   AR
as far as plates go, there is absolutely NO need to replace the steel ones unless the bike was SEVERELY abused, and they are extremely discolored, and or warped beyond spec... which I have never seen yet.

all that is needed are the fibre friction plates, and they must be assembled in specific sequence, per the FSM, and or the Microfich, they must also be 'pre-soaked' in the same oil you fill the tranny with, for about 6-24 hours, or at least a couple hours...
there are different numbered friction plates also, so be aware of that, it has to do with the splines, and keying of the outer diameter vs the inner diameter....
13088   13088-0031   PLATE-FRICTION   1   (outer plate only)   
13088A   13088-0033   PLATE-FRICTION   1   (inner plate only)   
13088B   13088-0037   PLATE-FRICTION   7      (remaing middle plates only)

My recommendation, if it IS NECESSARY to replace these, from abuse, is only use the OEM frictions, they are VERY consistent in manufacture, and as aftermarket plates often vary in thickness, and then it makes it necessary to start doing the complex, and painful stack height dimensions and measuring, which about 95% of 'home mechanics' will have difficulty with doing correctly... I also warn against replacing any of the clutch springs, as there are a number of them, and unless they don't measure up to the acceptable limits outlined in the FSM (again), it's wasted money, and effort.. and in the end, may give poorer clutch reliability then it originally had from the factory.

not to mention, there 18 of them... 6 on the outer plate, and 12 in the slipper....

92145   92145-0440   SPRING,15X2.7           6      
92145A   92145-0537   SPRING                  12

and now 4 starsprings, 2 pairs of each, stacked staggered, and correctly...
39130   39130-1078   SPRING-LEAF   2     (inner)   
39130A   39130-1079   SPRING-LEAF   2    (outer)

these clutches are extremely robust, changing them unless a catastrophic failure occurred, and just based on "I think I should do it, for no reason" doesn't make any sense.

if in doubt, add all those parts up... and be prepared for a shock... >:( :)) ;) ;) :rotflmao:

oops, forgot the gasket
11061B   11061-0810   GASKET,CLUTCH COVER   1


just for full effect... total of those parts comes to $343.31

friction plates only (which is all I would change) still runs $117.63

add oil...rags, sealants, and time...

When I went to buy steel plates the dealer asked for the VIN to match up the right plate. That's why I thought it was tied to VIN.

When I did a clutch job for a friends used bike purchase it was exactly what you said, abused and they used aftermarket plates and friction plates so we could not get the height right. So we went to the dealer and bought all Kawasaki matched parts to get the clutch fixed.