Concours Owners Group (COG) Forum

Motorcycle Talk => Motorcycle Safety => Topic started by: Salish14 on March 25, 2017, 09:04:49 pm

Title: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Salish14 on March 25, 2017, 09:04:49 pm
Putting aside all aspects of stupidity and basic bike riding knowledge, what are the two things you try and always do to reduce your risks while riding?

Me?

1. Following distance

2. Lane positioning
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: old n slow on March 25, 2017, 09:17:53 pm
1. speed

2. cross traffic awareness.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: 4Bikes on March 25, 2017, 09:22:32 pm
1.  Make sure I have it all together and I'm prepared to ride.  I.e, not distracted or messing with stuff early on when starting a ride.

2.  Look ahead at least 12 seconds and analyze the threats and my options to avoid them.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: gsun on March 25, 2017, 10:12:30 pm
1. Be aware of all the traffic around you.

2. Don't believe that someone would do the same as you in any situation. That may be giving them too much credit.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: works4me on March 25, 2017, 10:13:45 pm
I have two rules to ride by:
First, I don't like to follow, or be followed,
too closely by any vehicle.
Second, I don't ride if I'm running late,
like for work. I never try to make up
time on the bike.

I also have three rules for new riders:
1) Wear a helmet.
2) Get a MC license.
3) Don't drink and ride.
Sorry if that sounds preachy.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: gpd323 on March 25, 2017, 11:12:34 pm
https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/what-virginia-tech-learned-about-how-and-why-we-crash-our-motorcycles?utm_campaign=boosted-posts%7Ctpfn&utm_content=common-tread-how-to&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_term=what-virginia-tech-learned-about-how-and-why-we-crash-our-motorcycles-post-112116-%7Ctpfn (https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/what-virginia-tech-learned-about-how-and-why-we-crash-our-motorcycles?utm_campaign=boosted-posts%7Ctpfn&utm_content=common-tread-how-to&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_term=what-virginia-tech-learned-about-how-and-why-we-crash-our-motorcycles-post-112116-%7Ctpfn)

The full report in pdf is here. I printed it out and read through it several times.  :beerchug:


https://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/msf100_2016/Risk_Factors_From_MSF_100_Study_Paper.pdf (https://www.msf-usa.org/downloads/msf100_2016/Risk_Factors_From_MSF_100_Study_Paper.pdf)
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: instructor on March 25, 2017, 11:17:21 pm
All of the above and I don't mind at all being preached to, I can use all I can get these days it seems.  Number one for me is speed and road/traffic conditions.  Friend of mine always said he did not need to take a class for motorcycle riding and in the past 2-3 years he has crashed and has earned couple speeding tickets.  No hope for this guy from my viewpoint and it's a good thing his wife is wealthy and can spend money to cover his mistakes, but someday that won't work out so good I fear. 
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: ConcoursKZ on March 25, 2017, 11:23:09 pm
1 Never Tailgate

2 Always move through traffic at a pace faster than the flow looking for open real estate.

3 If people are passing you its time to park your bike and get a new hobby.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: old n slow on March 25, 2017, 11:27:00 pm
...

2 Always move through traffic at a pace faster than the flow looking for open real estate.

3 If people are passing you its time to park your bike and get a new hobby.

?????????
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Old Man on a Connie on March 25, 2017, 11:33:52 pm
T-CLOC's pre ride check. Never put yourself in others blind spot. Head check, awareness to others head checks (or lack there of).
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Warwgn on March 25, 2017, 11:48:19 pm
1. Keep my focus where I am going to be not where I am.

2. dont out ride my brakes
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: who me? on March 25, 2017, 11:50:48 pm
1 Ride my own ride
2 Ride early in the day
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: cra-z1000 on March 26, 2017, 01:42:43 am
1 Never Tailgate

2 Always move through traffic at a pace faster than the flow looking for open real estate.

3 If people are passing you its time to park your bike and get a new hobby.




If I always rode faster than the flow here I'd be at triple digit speeds all the time...lol .
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Mcfly on March 26, 2017, 01:58:55 am
1)  Stay on the motorcycle.
2)  Don't fall off the motorcycle

Then there's my golden rule:
Enjoy the ride.  Once I get aggravated or stressed out it's time to
Pull over and take a break...  Ridin' angry is bad juju.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Rev Ryder on March 26, 2017, 02:16:41 am
1)  Stay on the motorcycle.
2)  Don't fall off the motorcycle

Then there's my golden rule:
Enjoy the ride.  Once I get aggravated or stressed out it's time to
Pull over and take a break...  Ridin' angry is bad juju.
Similar to mine...
1. Shiny side up.
2. Rubber side down.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: RodWpg on March 26, 2017, 02:56:30 am
Drive as if you are completely invisible to others, don't get angry.... and that doesn't mean 'get even'
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Diz on March 26, 2017, 09:43:44 am
I try to leave my ego in the garage- especially if I have a pillion. Keeps me from thinking I'm invincible

Can't consistently look 12 seconds ahead but as far in front of me as possible.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: ron203 on March 26, 2017, 01:17:50 pm
1)  Stay on the motorcycle.
2)  Don't fall off the motorcycle

Then there's my golden rule:
Enjoy the ride.  Once I get aggravated or stressed out it's time to
Pull over and take a break...  Ridin' angry is bad juju.

+2  I'd add that if I'm not "feeling it" I don't ride. Whether physical (tired, sick, ?) or mental (angry, distracted, ?" 
You KNOW if it feels right. If it's not, I don't do it.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: ConcoursKZ on March 26, 2017, 01:27:11 pm
...

2 Always move through traffic at a pace faster than the flow looking for open real estate.

3 If people are passing you its time to park your bike and get a new hobby.

?????????

Everyone rides different. I get claustrophobic riding in a pack of cars and trucks. Some riders poke around in all lanes on a bike and get caught in blind spots, wind traps, frustrated drivers, drivers texting and eating. I have never had the patience for that. I am a pass on the left and merge back to the right rider. Constantly looking for the most open parts of the road.

I will adjust #3

3 If the flow of traffic is passing you IMO its time to park your bike and get a new hobby.

I will add a #4

4 If people are passing you on the right its time to park your bike and get a new hobby.

And keep in mind. These are my opinions and riding style, not necessarily yours. Always willing to hear the other side.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: ConcoursKZ on March 26, 2017, 01:31:15 pm
1 Never Tailgate

2 Always move through traffic at a pace faster than the flow looking for open real estate.

3 If people are passing you its time to park your bike and get a new hobby.




If I always rode faster than the flow here I'd be at triple digit speeds all the time...lol .

The great thing about a Concours is: Triple digits are only about 3/4 of an inch of throttle and a couple seconds away.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Salish14 on March 26, 2017, 06:52:35 pm
Interesting, fun and thought provoking replies. Glad to hear them. Sorry I hadn't originally posted this on the safety forum. One of the folks here said they advise their people not to drink and ride. I think that falls under the stupidity exemption! Hough points out that about 50% of all motorcycle fatalities involve drugs or alcohol. That's an easy one to put in your favor. Another 25% is dudes under 25, and for us codgers, we're safe on that one.

So putting that sort of stuff aside, it is genuinely interesting to hear what people do to skew the odds. I watch other riders and see what I like, or don't like, about what they are doing. Just yesterday I went for a pleasure ride and a guy on a 650 crotch rocket and full leathers came up behind me. Speed limit 40. Car in front of me doing about 42. Blind corners everywhere. The dude swerved hard in a low visibility area, gassed his bike, whined it out, and passed me and the car in front of me, not too quickly I will add. I laughed about the weak sauce power of his bike, but also said: He's dead in a year or two or today if he keeps that up. Low % move.

Curious what two things other people could identify as being their go to odd improvements?
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: EZ on March 27, 2017, 09:35:21 am
First two that come to mind are

1) Contently glancing in rear view while stopped until at least the first car behind me is stopped.
2) Never, under any circumstance do I follow a truck, or truck and trailer, of any kind. From a compact pick up to a dump truck.

Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: mnofpeace on March 27, 2017, 03:00:47 pm

1. watching for cager awareness; ie head turning, head dropping (looking at a cell phone, plate of food, reading a letter), checking        mirrors or lack their of.    :-[

2. Escape-route checks...so i can get out of a multitude of emergency situations.    :motonoises:
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: smithr1 on March 27, 2017, 05:20:52 pm
Ride in low population times and areas.  Both people(cage) and animal populations.

Have the best equipment in the best shape it can be in.    1% worse tire traction may be all it takes to loose it.  1% further braking distance may be to much.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: cra-z1000 on March 27, 2017, 11:28:48 pm
Never trust another drivers turn signal (if they even use one)  , and remember to turn your turn signal off (you better be using one ! ) .
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Irreverend Joe on March 28, 2017, 01:42:38 am
1. I try to never let another driver get into a place where they could hurt me.  If I'm in their blind spot, I go somewhere else.

2. I never assume that other drivers (and animals) will necessarily do the smart thing.

3. At intersections with cars waiting at stop signs where I have the right of way, I always watch the stopped cagers' front wheels - if they start to pull out in font of you, they can't move more than a couple of inches without you seeing their wheels start to turn, the rotation is obvious well before they've started to really get moving. 

4. Intersection are DEATH TRAPS for motorcycles, never take them lightly.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Salish14 on March 28, 2017, 02:50:08 am
Top TWO Irreverend Joe! Shoot, we could all write novels. Though I like your 3 and 4 quite well, and do those myself :)
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Ranger Jim on March 28, 2017, 10:37:11 am
1. Don't do stupid things.
2. Expect others to always do the stupid thing.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Swampcat on March 28, 2017, 11:24:16 am
To build off Irreverent Joe's last two:

1. I always stay in first gear at a traffic light. If I need to get out of the way of someone, I'm ready. (Gear and bike adjustments, etc., are handled by pulling off the road.)

2. Make sure you have an exit route at the light. I will stop so I can scoot between the cars ahead or onto a shoulder.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: smithr1 on March 28, 2017, 03:39:04 pm
I don't think it is smart to pull into the shoulder if you think the car behind you is not going to stop.  It is much better to pull between the cars in front of you but not much.   What would you do if you can't stop and a bike is in front of you stopped?  You are going to try and swerve to the shoulder to miss the bike.   If the bike then also heads for the shoulder, :(
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Swampcat on March 28, 2017, 04:57:11 pm
I don't think it is smart to pull into the shoulder if you think the car behind you is not going to stop.  It is much better to pull between the cars in front of you but not much.   What would you do if you can't stop and a bike is in front of you stopped?  You are going to try and swerve to the shoulder to miss the bike.   If the bike then also heads for the shoulder, :(
Good point on using the shoulder. Of course, the car swerves assuming the driver has seen you. They may not. That's not a route I'd normally consider if I can get between two cars and get some protection that way.

Two weeks ago I was on an interstate on ramp and about 5-6 vehicles ahead of me a car plowed into the car ahead because the driver didn't realize the traffic on the ramp was stopped. Maybe the driver was on his phone; I don't know. But he didn't slow down one bit nor swerve in either direction.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Boomer on March 28, 2017, 06:46:17 pm
Trust your instincts. Your subconscious sees things you don't consciously notice. (Use The Force Luke)
Everyone else is trying to kill you. Paranoia is a survival tactic! :D
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: MizzouMike on March 28, 2017, 07:12:52 pm
I also follow #2 in the fact that I will accelerate to get into a more 'open' spot when on the interstate / commuting.  I have more awareness of what is in front of me, than what is behind me, so often that means moving a bit faster than the flow (within reason).  For me it is usually brief, but I was also ticketed for 85 in in a 60 for that.  It was gameday football traffic, and I was looking for a hole/open spot in traffic.   Most of the folks were decked out in their fan gear, and texting / talking / etc...  I sped into a pocket only to find myself pulled over by the Highway Patrol.

He was a bit surprised to find an 'old guy' under the helmet, but I still go the ticket.  In hindsight I would have been a little less enthusiasic in my approach, but I still was very uncomfortable in the four full lanes of traffic.

1 Never Tailgate

2 Always move through traffic at a pace faster than the flow looking for open real estate.

3 If people are passing you its time to park your bike and get a new hobby.




If I always rode faster than the flow here I'd be at triple digit speeds all the time...lol .
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Thud300 on March 28, 2017, 11:39:04 pm
1. Do your best to be seen (conspicuity, lane position, weaving a bit at oncoming left turners)

1.5. See them before they see you.

2. Assume they never see you, despite your best efforts to actually be seen.  :truce:

Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Salish14 on March 29, 2017, 12:11:15 am
1. Do your best to be seen (conspicuity, lane position, weaving a bit at oncoming left turners)

1.5. See them before they see you.

2. Assume they never see you, despite your best efforts to actually be seen.  :truce:

I'd not heard of the weaving, but like that idea. I find myself often flicking my brights at every intersection or anyone possibly pulling out into my lane from a side road.

And if I had listed a #3, I would agree with those saying to assume the worst of everyone. My mantra is that I assume everyone is TRYING TO KILL ME, BUT THEY ARE CLEVER! They try to hide their intentions to better catch me off guard. This pisses me off just enough to keep me on my guard!
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Dave Scott on March 29, 2017, 12:17:28 am
1.  when in town, I always watch vehicle actions and changes, not the driver.  for example, I watch for a wheel to turn, or a slight roll.  characteristics of the vehicle while they stop.  or their lane positioning when riding with flow.  I never trust eye contact with a driver.

2.  never relax on the bike to the point that I am riding on it.  I'm upright and attentive in my riding style to better handle the bike and circumstances.  arms bent, core strength, pegs on the balls of my feet.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Thud300 on March 29, 2017, 01:08:32 am
I'd not heard of the weaving, but like that idea.

https://youtu.be/eqQBubilSXU
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: antibus on March 29, 2017, 01:07:22 pm
Look ahead at least 12 seconds.
Keep my speed legal.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: works4me on March 29, 2017, 02:00:13 pm
Quote from: Salish14
[/quote
I find myself often flicking my brights at every intersection or anyone possibly pulling out into my lane from a side road.

I would caution against this practice.
Drivers may misinterpret this as "go ahead"
and pull out into your path.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: sailrider on March 29, 2017, 07:38:13 pm
Years ago, when I was working in pipeline safety, I was certified as a "Smith System" driving instructor.  You guys are talking about some very good points.  To sum them up using Smith System jargon, and keeping with two odds improving behaviors, I'd offer the following:
1. Situational awareness
2. Always leave yourself an out

Mark aka sailrider
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: 4Bikes on March 30, 2017, 11:25:05 am
Quote from: Salish14
[/quote
I find myself often flicking my brights at every intersection or anyone possibly pulling out into my lane from a side road.

I would caution against this practice.
Drivers may misinterpret this as "go ahead"
and pull out into your path.

I learned that this was a no-no at the Stayin Safe Advanced Riding course.  To reinforce that point, they showed a video of a ride group leader flashing his lights at a truck pulling a horse trailer waiting to turn right.  The driver of the truck interpreted that flash as a "go ahead and pull out" and the group had to endure following that slow truck through the best twisties on the entire ride.    :-[
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Salish14 on March 30, 2017, 02:42:32 pm
Among the many values of these sorts of hive mind forum threads is the chance to learn and calibrate what is best practice. As far as flashing brights, I see the dilemma. We know the main goal is to be seen. Swerving is one way to try and be seen, and would work many situations. I live here in the very rainy PNW, and this may play some part. Water spray and dirty windshields further reduce visibility.

I hear the concern about brights flashing, and yet see a role for it at times still. If I am flashing brights, I am only seeking to be seen. If I am flashing brights, I have seen that threat from some distance. That means my eyes are on them. If they see my brights flash, and interpret that to go ahead, then they have seen me. So far so good. If I am going a reasonable speed, and have sight distance in play, even if they are boneheads and pull out I have time to evade. Seeing me, and seeing them, is still the highest priority.

On a dry day and dry road with good sight lines, I would be way less concerned and see swerving as a good approach.

Or maybe I will go ahead with my plan to build an LED powered billboard mounted to my windshield, about 8X8 feet, that displays a picture of a big scary 18 wheeler with skulls and rim spikes barreling down on them.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Dave Scott on March 30, 2017, 04:00:49 pm
last year I took a motorcycle safety course taught by the NC Police departments. http://ncmotorcyclesafety.org/courses/ (http://ncmotorcyclesafety.org/courses/)

it was really a more basic course, but also included half day of road riding and critique by officers.  one of the things they mentioned was riding the bike back/forth across the lane to get more attention.  from what I gathered, any attention you can get while riding is generally good in terms of being seen.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: WillyP on March 31, 2017, 12:15:48 am
1... Don't put your knee down unless you are on a track and wearing knee-sliders. If you hang off the bike in a turn keep your knee tucked in, the pavement is closer than you think!

2... Don't get more than one speeding ticket in any one area. Or more than a couple in one state. Because, if you do then you might find you have to ride without a license, which (so I'm told ;) ) is very dangerous.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Uncle Rob on March 31, 2017, 03:20:49 pm
On four lane roads with heavy and crossing traffic, I always ride to the left side of the left lane.  This is to make myself more visible to oncoming or cross traffic.  If you ride in the right lane, vehicles in the left lane act as rolling screens and it is much harder to be seen.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: NeroW on March 31, 2017, 05:31:08 pm
Told to me when I was 16 by a Professor of Physics who rode a bad-a** Z1.

1. Be as predictable as you can be to the other vehicles, without impeding your own safety.
2. The inherent danger of any situation is proportional to the number and proximity of other vehicles.
3. Any danger you bring upon yourself is called "stupidity".

Simplistic perhaps (and one more than you asked for), but found I've never been able to fault them.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: lars on April 01, 2017, 01:23:57 am
Bunches of excellent ideas!

Mine:

1.  Don't doddle in another vehicle's blind spot.  Kick it up a notch until you're even with the driver.

2.  On a busy/crowded freeway move to the left lane,  go whatever speed they're going, maintain a safe following distance, and do the look 12 seconds ahead, and try to divine what other drivers might do.  The idea being that in this situation trouble will only come from your right.  You don't need to worry about merging cars or the kamikaze driver that will blindly cross three lanes of traffic to make the next exit, or cars changing lanes from either side.

 
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: who me? on April 01, 2017, 09:03:59 pm
Told to me when I was 16 by a Professor of Physics who rode a bad-a** Z1.

1. Be as predictable as you can be to the other vehicles, without impeding your own safety.
2. The inherent danger of any situation is proportional to the number and proximity of other vehicles.
3. Any danger you bring upon yourself is called "stupidity".

Simplistic perhaps (and one more than you asked for), but found I've never been able to fault them.
3 cracked me up for some reason but it is true :))
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Mcfly on April 02, 2017, 11:01:24 am
You don't need to worry about merging cars or the kamikaze driver that will blindly cross three lanes of traffic to make the next exit, or cars changing lanes from either side.

Just keep your eye out for the kamikaze driver that will blindly cross three lanes of traffic going from the acceleration lane to the left lane....   :-[
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: rcannon409 on April 02, 2017, 12:10:28 pm
Years ago, when I was working in pipeline safety, I was certified as a "Smith System" driving instructor.  You guys are talking about some very good points.  To sum them up using Smith System jargon, and keeping with two odds improving behaviors, I'd offer the following:
1. Situational awareness
2. Always leave yourself an out

Mark aka sailrider

I was trained in the Smith System a year ago, and just finished a follow up course, and I agree completely.

The companies trained us in this to save money on accidents, but the system is great for motorcycles too.

We do not get to do the instructor course unless we have an accident.  I had someone hit me, from behind, but it happened so quickly, they did not blame me, so no instructor course.

Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: beaucephus on April 02, 2017, 12:41:00 pm
I do most of my riding with my dad and brother.   We put most of the miles on before 8:30 on Sunday.  I don't expect anyone to keep lane discipline, or follow traffic signals.  I go when I see everyone stop, even if it means I get honked at.  First gear until I see all the cars behind me stop.  Stay out of the shadows of other vehicles when stopping. 
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Salish14 on April 26, 2017, 01:33:53 am
This has been such a fruitful and interesting discussion. Someone who writes for the magazine should compile these and put together a little best of. Truth is, if we all did these things all the time, our chances of bad accidents would go far down. I'm already delighted that I'm over 21 and never ride under the influence. Just those two facts reduces my chance of death on my bike by over 50%. I buy back some of that death chance by how I ride, but not much.

Since starting this thread I've been even more mindful of my daily safety behaviors. One thing I'm curious about that gets said here a lot, is the approach to staying safe at stops. I hear people talk about giving yourself an out at stops, and I get why, but really, how would you do that? I suppose you can stop way over on the side of the lane, and watch your mirrors, and at the last second if the bozo isn't stopping, gas it and try to squirt forward between cars or onto the shoulder. That must be what people mean. I watch my mirrors, but haven't arranged myself in the lane for that sort of ready escape forward in the final micro second.

Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: smithr1 on April 26, 2017, 04:38:52 pm
When you hear the screeching be ready to jump str8 up.   :great:

If you are lucky you might be able to get by the car in front in time if you position correct but chances are it is just better that they push you into that gap rather then be crushed between.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Tour1 on July 11, 2017, 04:52:12 am
I try to take extra care to avoid riding near sunrise or sunset.  Our roads go east-west because it's a long island but not a wide one.  My 1 hour commute had me squinting into the sun for too much of the ride and I developed the habit of stopping for breakfast as soon as the big orange ball came over the hills and trees.  Enjoy a meal and read a book until the shadows are not too long.  I also put a strip of metallic tape on my faceshield where it would substitute for what a sun visor does in a car.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Jorge on July 12, 2017, 12:20:28 am
1- Be seen. I normally wear bright colors, brightly colored helmet, and have two 10W LED running lights mounted at the widest point on the bike. That makes me a wider, brighter picture.
2- Stay out of blind spots. As others have said, if you're going a bit faster than vehicles around, spend as little time as possible in their blind spots, and even next to them. "Jump" from just behind their rear bumper, to in front of the driver, or right fender.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: ron203 on July 12, 2017, 02:20:36 pm
Stopping when I notice that I'm getting tired or dehydrated. Same thing if I'm slabbing and I find myself "passing that NEXT car" and then "the NEXT" one and I'm getting faster and faster. Time to stop and "re-set."
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Ingramite on August 11, 2017, 09:22:33 pm
Whew, all good responses, so it's difficult to add much of value.
As a Certified Smith Systems Safe Driving Instructor and safety professional for large trucking fleets for the past 35 years.....I could bore ya to tears...in just a few sentences.....trust me, I lecture for a living.

Instead, let me impart a little old leather Road Craft to see if ya dig what I'm layin down on mirrors

1) Mirrors can NEVER tell you yes....only no. Just because you don't see a car in your mirrors doesn't mean that there is not a car there. Remember this S.M.O.G..
(S) ignal
(M) irror
(O) ver The Shoulder......the famed "Head Check"
(G) o
That's the only safe way to change lanes.

2) Mirrors - Do you ride at night? Troubled by dazzle from headlights behind you?
Cut the feet off of a pair of your wifes pantyhose (remember those)?
Slip the stockings over your mirrors.....wow, why didn't I think of that before???
This little trick knocks down all of the distracting glare but you remain aware of the traffic behind you.

Tom
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: ron203 on August 12, 2017, 12:03:27 am
Cool. Never thought of those. Thanks.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: C. Moore on August 24, 2017, 10:42:54 am
This is a great thread. When I come up on traffic on a multi lane road and a car is tailgating another car my radar goes into warning mode. There's about a 99% probability that the tailgater is going to abruptly change lanes without a turn signal. They just have to get ahead of that car in front of them.  I always back off in that situation and let 'em do their thing.  Let me also add that I never trust that people have their side rear view mirrors set properly. Most don't.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Robby1953 on September 18, 2017, 12:35:23 am

1. watching for cager awareness; ie head turning, head dropping (looking at a cell phone, plate of food, reading a letter), checking        mirrors or lack their of.    :-[

2. Escape-route checks...so i can get out of a multitude of emergency situations.    :motonoises:

+1
Along with Lane position and distance behind and in front
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Road Runner on September 19, 2017, 12:19:36 am
Attached is the new, highly recommended eye test for cagers  :-)
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Jerdurr on September 19, 2017, 05:12:17 pm
My $0.02...
1) read cars' front tires, all around you.
2) Never EVER tail gate, anyone.
3) If when stopped at a light the cager in front of me is building a fort, reading the paper, playing with his phone, and late to take off on green, I pass them safely but quickly, and get away from them as much as possible.
4) Be mindful of the outside temperature, and my tires' temperature; dew, the cold, all of that affects my traction.
5) If I realize I'm starting to tense up, it is probably because I am riding a bit "too close to the edge"; time to lay off the throttle a bit, relax, and take my time/enjoy the ride.
6) Very important one; if the driver beside me, on an avenue, is clutching to the wheel for their lives, almost white knuckles, get away from them. No worse driver than a scared one.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Bill on October 14, 2017, 01:09:05 am
Mine are

1.)  Cover your controls at all times

2.)  Never let anything catch your attention for more than a few seconds
Title: top two
Post by: Salish14 on October 23, 2017, 03:07:51 am
Mine are

1.)  Cover your controls at all times

2.)  Never let anything catch your attention for more than a few seconds

Interesting. Do you actually cover them at ALL times, or only at all times that warrant? I find myself covering as needed, but not when on a very low risk stretch of road. This actually reminds me of the importance of practicing your panic stops in a parking lot. It's incredible how quickly an ABS bike with good tires can stop if you just clamp down and brace. The hardest thing is letting up at the last second so you don't just teeter over on your side!
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Uncle Rob on October 24, 2017, 03:43:09 pm
1.  Don't get distracted and lose focus.  Most of my accidents and close calls have been from lack of situational awareness.
2.  Don't depend on your mirrors on the highway.  Turn your head before you change lanes.  It helps you see others and may make it apparent to them that you are looking to to change lanes.
3.  Keep your spacing.  If someone really wants to pass you, let them.  It's easier to keep an eye on them if they are in front of you.
4.  Try to be visible and predictable.   
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Locomotiveman on November 24, 2017, 10:19:05 pm
Good Helmet, gloves.
Have an 'Out' if something nutty happens ahead.
Defensive braking as needed.
Leave the Ego back home.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Road Runner on November 26, 2017, 10:27:50 pm
1.  Don't get distracted and lose focus.  Most of my accidents and close calls have been from lack of situational awareness.
2.  Don't depend on your mirrors on the highway.  Turn your head before you change lanes.  It helps you see others and may make it apparent to them that you are looking to to change lanes.
3.  Keep your spacing.  If someone really wants to pass you, let them.  It's easier to keep an eye on them if they are in front of you.
4.  Try to be visible and predictable.

+1  :great:
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Thud300 on November 29, 2017, 02:41:25 am
Lately, I've developed "crazy eyes". Think Mike Singletary of the '85 Chicago Bears.

That, and a sort of sixth sense about what's going on around me that might pose a threat.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: TLR on December 18, 2017, 05:45:07 am
This is an old thread, but a LOT of wisdom here. 

My $ .02:

Personally, I try to do most of the things others have suggested here, but there are three things I always do--well, almost always, that is:

1.  Before I take off on the bike, I ask myself, "Is this the day I'm going to kill myself on this bike".  That seems to clear my head of all peripheral concerns and thoughts and gets me in the right frame of mind.

2.  First part of my mantra:  "Split the danger."  A phrase from our Idaho motorcycle safety courses, and useful for riding on freeways, or two lane country roads or city traffic, whatever.  It means to ride in the lane so that you split the danger among all oncoming things that might kill you.  (Cars, light poles, whatever.)

3.  Second part of my mantra:  "Blind spots, blind spots."   Watch for them, stay out of them.


Finally, ride with a headlight modulator and a white helmet.  That works for all the visibility questions.  I've been riding with a headlight modulator for years, and it still amazes me how it changes cagers' behavior--in my favor.

Good thread!
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Larry_Buck_FL on December 18, 2017, 02:07:32 pm
All great points, guys. I try to use many of them in teaching the Rider Course.

I've always had a white helmet. My kids think I look like a Q-tip riding down the road - but it does get noticed and it's
not as hot as a black one in summer.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: smithr1 on December 18, 2017, 03:14:13 pm
My reason for doing the white helmet was two fold as well.  It is cooler in the heat and the cars around me might mistake me for a cop and drive better.  I can always hope anyway.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: bobgroger on December 18, 2017, 08:56:01 pm
1. Don't ride if you don't feel 100% You need to be at 100% to notice and react.
2. There is a place for bad behavior. In traffic is NOT it. You have an additional escape route in the slow lane

I remember pulling on to a highway in my cage, in a residential area. I saw a bike at least a quarter mile away, plenty of room. Except he was going 100+ in a 40. And HE was pissed that I pulled out and passed me on the shoulder. Don't be that guy.
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Capn' Kirk on January 08, 2018, 09:33:13 pm
My reason for doing the white helmet was two fold as well.  It is cooler in the heat and the cars around me might mistake me for a cop and drive better.  I can always hope anyway.

Yep, I used to be a black helmet/jacket kind of guy, then I moved to California. Highlighter yellow jacket and helmet now. Much cooler in the summer, and way more people see me. This is evidenced by more cars sliding over while filtering.

As for my rules:

1. Don't ride in an obnoxious manner
2. Remain hyper aware of my surroundings and what others are doing
3. Enjoy the ride
Title: Re: Your top two odd improving behaviors?
Post by: Roger B on April 19, 2018, 03:40:54 pm
I check my mirrors often.
Stay out of car/truck blind spots, I either slow down or speed up, minimize the time in the blind spot.
If I see a lane switcher on the 4 lanes I keep my eye on them, many switch lanes abruptly without warning or turn signal.
I pick my spots where I will run fast.
Make sure my bike and tires are in good nic.