Author Topic: 2001 cali model sonic blue connie  (Read 285 times)

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Offline alex

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2001 cali model sonic blue connie
« on: July 01, 2019, 11:24:13 pm »
Hey guys, if you want a near mint blue connie, sans smog, with a possible hydro-lock but runs well (just eats a lot of gas) with a ton of add-on's air horns/full highway bars/luggage/soft-hard/decals and a lot more please feel free to call me @ 831-624-1704 i'm in Carmel  CA, the bike is currently in non-op with 23,000 miles on the clock and i have a ad on craigslist, you can see the ad on Monterey  craigslist/motorcycles also i'm selling my Milwaukee chaps by shaff, i'll sell both for $1,800 i just need to move on and get a reliable bike to get the hell outta California, i just cant afford to live here anymore :'( , i have been told from mikes super bikes that the problem might be a bit more trivial, but alas i have neither the time or money to find out, i need to move to Las Vegas soon, to fulfill my dream, please feel free to call me anytime night or day. Thank You All!

Offline DC Concours

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Re: 2001 cali model sonic blue connie
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2019, 02:22:37 am »
make it easier by providing a link to your ad

Offline LeeM

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Re: 2001 cali model sonic blue connie
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2019, 03:36:01 am »
Alex, time is the unnoticed bystander when one finds oneself in a jam and one says "I have no choice." Connie motorcycles are hard to figure out because the fairing encloses everything. It doesn't help that the owners manual and the Clymer's manual do not explain where components are nor how they work.  There are a number of guys on this Forum that can advise you more.

The good news is, beneath the fairings, Connies have a lot of automotive technology. It is all packed in a bit tightly, and remember these bikes will go 120 mph so they need to be carefully reassembled.

As you say "I really don't see any other option." If you are trying to show up for a job or move out of an apartment, talk to people and ask for 7 to 10 days. I guess that you need about a calendar week and three days of work time and work place with a big piece of clean cardboard to kneel and lie on, and an out-of-the wind work site. The strategy here is to start looking for something simple.  A bad fuel valve, bolloxed crankcase ventillation, and a cable not fully pressed down on a spark plug can cause the darndest problems.

Lees law is: No matter how bad it seems, look at what the last mechanic did. Most mystery symptoms are a side effect of a mechanic not putting things together quite right or of messing something up that has no relation to what the mechanic was doing. The last mechanic always by definition is you. Boing!

With Connies, you do eventually have to remove the seat, fuel tank(mark smog hoses first, unplug fuel gage), side bags, side fairing strips, disconnect battery ground cable and grab those two rubber tank mounting donuts and one rubber frame-tank cushion.

At the public library, see if they have any Kawasaki 4 cylinder shop manual. Get your flashlight all charged, scrounge a cardboard box to sit on. Call the previous owner and ask for all the hoses and pieces of the emissions control devices that were removed. Dig through the trash can, every one of those hoses is way cheaper to recover than to buy anew. Hoses from Napa and O'Reilly usually don't fit well. If there are receipts in the fairing compartments, sort them and read them.

The next thing I urge you to do is do not turn the fuel petcock on the left side of the motorcycle. If it is on Prime, move it to Reserve.   Inspect the fuel valve with a flashlight. If there is any sign of leakage, the cheapest repair path is to buy a petcock rebuild kit from murph's kits. Their regular mail service is fast.

Start in with simple things: Get a pad of paper and take notes. Find the sight glass on the left side of crankcase. The oil line is the middle of the sight glass. Budget and tools permitting, replace the engine oil with 10-w40 motorcycle oil.   Motorcycle oil only.

Next, get a clean small plastic dish and a 3 mm Allen hex wrench. Put the bike on the centerstand (a piece of 1/2" thick wood under the rear tire reduces the amount of heaving required). Look at the leftmost carburetor float bowl, find the drain screw, is everything clean? Open the drain screw at the bottom of the float bowl. Look for a match head size drop of water in the first 1/8 cup of drain fuel. The float bowl should become empty because the motorcycle has a vacuum operated fuel valve. The vacuum operated fuel valve is part of the petcock mentioned above. One drop of water in the left float bowl makes the bike run bad.

Now look at the linkages of the carburetors. The choke lever on the left handlebar moves a sliding bar. See that it works. The right hand throttle has two cables starting at the handgrip. One cable opens the carburetors and the other cable pulls the carburetors closed. Peek in past the fuel valve and confirm that the throttle is working right. Working on the left side of the bike, remove the left shin panel and look at the air cleaner. My bike has an oily foam air cleaner, and you are snooping for signs that something may have been re-assembled wrong.

Best wishes and write back OK?

Cheer up. Save your fasteners in empty yoghurt containers  and take notes. Best wishes. Lee




Offline LeeM

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Re: 2001 cali model sonic blue connie
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2019, 02:42:57 am »
As you say " sans smog, with a possible hydro-lock but runs well (just eats a lot of gas) " . I'm going to guess like this, "just eats a lot of gas" might be a clue that a pair of the evaporative emission cannister hoses are reversed. The evaporative emission system is a cannister with a solenoid valve and three hoses. The cannister has a sticker on it's side with a diagram showing the hose connections. Two of those hoses go up to the air cleaner. One hose is to get filtered air and the other hose dumps either vapors or fuel into the engine under certain circumstances. With a flashlight and lots of patience one of those hoses might be misconnected and the evap system is dumping fuel into the engine causing "just eats lots of gas." I am going to add, you really should take notes if you look for a misconnected hose.

Mechanics work. Get that shop manual if you can. Put bike on centerstand. On left side rear of the seat, turn the lock and lift rear of seat up and off.Remove left and right plastic shin guards. Disconnect ground cable from battery and push ground cable aside so it will not spring back. You can do a lot of evap system hose tracing. Next is removing the fuel tank. Find three hose connections at the rear top of the fuel tank. Those little dinky wire ring hose clamps are easy to lose, they will slide down the hose. About 3" from the end of the hose, I wrapped vinyl electrical tape to make a slide stopper. I also added a color code label (using electricians color label tape set) to one of the hoses that had no hose label but the hose was plugged into a blue dot marked connection on the fuel tank.

With  the hoses labeled and removed, go to the left side where the fuel valve is and see a motorcycle fuel line and a motorcycle vacuum hose. Get low and look up with a flashlight. Both hoses connect to the vacuum fuel valve. Is your vacuum fuel valve shutting off the fuel when the engine is off? You will know from the previous drain the carburetor activity. Disconnect the vacuum hose and fuel line. If the valve leaks, buy  a 6 foot piece of fuel line or tubing and drain the tank into a proper gas can. Work safely! No puddles, no gas water heater pilot lights, no smoking! Remove two 10 mm hex bolts, at back of tank. Lift tank 6" and unplug the fuel gage connector in the rear right underside of the fuel tank. Get a cardboard box to hold the fuel tank without hitting the vacuum valve or fuel gauge sending unit on the floor. As soon as you lift the fuel tank free look at the motorcycle frame for rubber pad that prevents the tank from hitting the center steel frame tube. Mark it's location. Up front, find two 2" diameter rubber donuts. These donuts are the front fuel tank mounting bushings. Grab these two devices before they fall down into the dark recesses below. Use some kind of glue or adhesive to make these bushings stay in place when reassembling the bike. I kid you not, I lost one.

Think of your bike as having initially one thing wrong. It is easy to forget which emission hose goes where. The point of making notes and diagrams and sketches as you go is to support you when you stumble across that one little mistake that is making your bike run poorly.
Best wishes,  The Connie loves to go fast (In Nevada, not CHP city) and Nevada is hot. Check tires and check coolant.