Author Topic: Coolant question  (Read 1112 times)

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Offline WillyP

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #25 on: September 06, 2017, 11:34:11 pm »
Boil-over is a safety device to let you know you have a problem.

If you are stuck in traffic on a hot day, with conventional coolant, you will be warned, by the smell of antifreeze, before the bike overheats.

At the risk of getting into a back and forth with amateur scientists discussing engine coolant, I believe by the time your coolant boils, some form of damage may have already occurred.  To me, what you're claiming is like saying the sound of connecting rod bearings knocking is an indication you have lost oil pressure. 

No, because the smell of coolant overheating occurs well before the boil over removes the coolant from the motor. Then you take steps to cool the motor down... ie, shut it off, pull over, whatever. The damage occurs when the boil over has removed enough coolant from the motor that the motor is no longer cooled. Air, or steam, is not sufficent to cool the motor.
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The coolant temperature gauge is the best and most reliable indication of engine temperature, not the smell of steaming glycol water mix.
That's only true if it's working and accurate, you understand what it's telling you, and you are looking at it.
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You missed the point of waterless coolant boiling at 400F:  Running waterless coolant, boiling point is taken out of equation.  The coolant continues to work all the way up to 400F.  50/50 Glycol/water based coolants won't provide cooling above 223F.  Of course no engine will function at 400F, but with coolant that contains no water, cooling will continue up to that level.  Once 50/50 water/Glycol boils, steam pockets around hot areas in the passages form and the coolant is no longer carrying away heat from those hot areas.  Thermal distortion of metal, especially aluminum, can occur when coolant boils.           

If you don't let your motor overheat, boiling point is taken out of the equation.
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Offline LeeM

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Re: Coolant question - two tools you may find helpful
« Reply #26 on: September 07, 2017, 04:36:50 am »
I'll add my opinion that your temperature gauge is working and the temperatures changes are a lot like my 2000 Concours with 75K miles and a new water pump and a new thermostat and home made thermostat housing  gasket.

First, on what kind of coolant, I use NAPA's pink Asian vehicle coolant. The original coolant I understand was a Green color Asian vehicle coolant. Coolant is toxic and keep it away from kids and animals. Get a clean, empty labeled 1 gallon bottle ready when you begin your cooling system work.

 Distilled water and a spray bottle of it are very handy as a test fluid and spray to wash coolant puddles off of the engine. A Smart and Final gray plastic bus tray fits under the bike to catch coolant drips and mess. Oh yes, you will need a long neck funnel to slowly pour new coolant into the bike.

There is a metric coolant drain plug at the bottom lower left coolant tube. Follow the left edge of the radiator down, down, down. Oh yeah. Lots of kneeling. Get a chunk of carpet.

On coolant system tools, I made a rubber plug with a hand operated vacuum pump. You can use this tool to "burp" the cooling system when you add coolant after repairs. The water pump forms an air pocket.

A second tool for cooling system work: I have a Stant Radiator pressure tester (about $120) and a gadget called the Honda or Ford Festiva radiator adapter hooks up to the Kawasaki fill neck. You have to remove the motorcycle gas tank to attach the radiator pressure tester. My bike has a NAPA inch size coolant hose coming off of the thermostat housing.  The tester showed me a persistent leak at the ends of that hose and I finally skootched the hose clamps over the rolled ridge of the connector pipes. The tester guided me to a fairly good mickey mouse repair that would have been a huge pain in the rear otherwise.

Many of the previous posts on this thread are very good guides. Best wishes.

Offline BobT_MA

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #27 on: September 07, 2017, 12:24:33 pm »
I've read that we should be using a silicate and phosphate free antifreeze in our Connies. Does anyone else agree with this statement?

Offline Wizeguy

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #28 on: September 07, 2017, 03:45:06 pm »
I've read that we should be using a silicate and phosphate free antifreeze in our Connies. Does anyone else agree with this statement?
Agreed, agreed, agreed.  We all know how opinions are, everyone has one.  But Kawasaki and essentially every single other Japanese manufacturer recommends that you use what is, in more modern terms, silicate and phosphate free (OAT, or Organic Acid Technology) coolant.  I use Toyota Super Long Life Coolant.
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Offline Bob H

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #29 on: September 10, 2017, 01:38:07 am »
Where can I find Kawasaki's recommendation?  I'd like to read it.
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Offline captconcours

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #30 on: September 11, 2017, 11:37:12 pm »
Hi All,
I am going to jump on this thread since I have a coolant / thermostat question.  I have an 05 Connie with 88,500 ish miles on her and I noticed a small pool of coolant on the engine while looking for a washer that popped off the valve cover while installation following a valve adjustment.  Upon further checking I could see several spots on my thermostat that appeared to be leaking coolant. Now the engine had been cold ( valve adjustment) but I did use the modified method of hitting the starter to position the valves vs taking off the pickup coil cover.  Don't know enough to know if that would cause a leaky thermostat to leak and leave evidence but I clearly have a problem.  Question, based on the age and miles of the bike is it best to just replace the thermostat vs just replacing o-rings?  Wish I had found this a month or so ago when I had the carbs off.  :(
John Ashton  Ft. Worth, TX  COG 6513  CDA0326  AMA 1078826  05 Concours

Offline cra-z1000

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #31 on: September 11, 2017, 11:46:44 pm »
Yes , that sucks . Its so much easier when the carbs are out of the way . The orings are probably shot and do the tstat while you're there . There are several non oem tstats that will work . A list is here in the forum . If you pull the carbs you really should change the coolant log orings as well to save a future problem .
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Offline captconcours

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #32 on: September 11, 2017, 11:56:28 pm »
Thanks for the quick response!
John Ashton  Ft. Worth, TX  COG 6513  CDA0326  AMA 1078826  05 Concours

Offline Tjnoma99

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #33 on: September 12, 2017, 12:27:10 am »
I bought the thermostat and all the orings from Murphskits.com. And I'm still trying to figure out how to get the thermostat housing off. I'm gonna change the orings when the weather gets crappy here. And it is much easier to get to everything with the carbs pulled!
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Offline KellyfromVA

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #34 on: September 12, 2017, 12:46:18 am »
I bought the thermostat and all the orings from Murphskits.com. And I'm still trying to figure out how to get the thermostat housing off. I'm gonna change the orings when the weather gets crappy here. And it is much easier to get to everything with the carbs pulled!

There are two O-rings that leak around the thermostat housing:
1. Small ring between the thermostat housing and the coolant log.
2. Around the thermostat housing cover.

If you don't want to remove the carbs and have verified the leak is around the thermostat cover or lower, you can get the thermostat housing off, albeit it is tight, so pack some patience:

Remove the seat, gas tank, and coil packs (or just unbolt and swing the coil packs forward out of your way.
Disconnect the hose that connects to the thermostat housing and the radiator.  It's kind of a pain, but after removing the hose clamp, slide the hose off while pulling it toward the front of the bike.  No need to remove it from the radiator end.

The thermostat housing is held on by just a couple screws, one you can get between the frame and the other on the side.  You can pull up and work the housing from between the frame and the coolant log out of the bike for service.

Once you have the housing off take it to a workbench or clean work area.  Remove the top housing cover, and clean the lower housing O-ring area and the thermostat housing O-ring with Scotchbrite, to remove any corrosion or left over O-ring gunk in the grooves where the O-rings go.  Put a light coating of dielectric (silicone) grease around both O-rings and make sure they fit cleanly around the thermostat housing and replace the cover.  Do the same with the thermostat housing neck/assembly, manipulating the assembly back onto the coolant log  and put it back together.  When refilling the coolant, crack the vent valve on the side of the thermostat housing and fill coolant in the radiator filler until it runs out of the thermostat housing vent.  Tighten the vent, and put the rest of the bike back together.

Good Luck!


Offline Tjnoma99

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #35 on: September 12, 2017, 12:47:45 am »
Awesome! Thank you!
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Offline Tjnoma99

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Re: Coolant question
« Reply #36 on: September 12, 2017, 03:43:26 pm »
So I just did the thermostat housing. HOLY NO SPACE BATMAN! Kelly you weren't kidding about patience. I got it though. Doesn't help I'm fighting a cold too!
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2015 Yamaha Raider xv1900, 2005 Yamaha Roadstar Warrior xv1700, 2003 Kawasaki Concours