Author Topic: First valve adjustment  (Read 829 times)

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Offline Nosmo

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Re: First valve adjustment
« Reply #25 on: September 03, 2017, 04:31:32 am »
Well, I never differ with MOB, but......but.....ummmm, yeah, on my bike I can shift through the range normally by slowly bumping the rear wheel by hand, without the engine running or crankshaft turning, it somehow defeats the Automatic Neutral Hider.  I have SISF's "7th gear" mod, but otherwise nothing done in the engine/trans that would affect it. 

But for valve lash adjustments, I just use the starter bump method with the plugs out.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2017, 04:35:34 am by Nosmo »
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Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: First valve adjustment
« Reply #26 on: September 03, 2017, 05:28:02 am »
Neutral to 2nd, roll tire slowly and pull up on shift lever.  2nd to 3rd, roll tire forward until it bumps from taking up all the drive-line slack.  Not too hard, just a good bump and pull up on the shift lever again.  Repeat....


Yes, this can be done. I didn't believe it myself until Ken Dick showed me how to do it. Not once but many times. It is just a matter of technique. But that didn't keep me from removing the pesky automatic neutral finder when I had the transmission out for another project:



With perfect results I might add.

Dan


Interesting D
I'm a bit surprised.... but not amazed,  :great:
Thanks for showing that pic also...
I don't call "ball" feature a neutral "finder" tho, I call it an "upshift lockout" mechanism...

Now for the million dollar question....
Can anyone explain why it exists, and why it has been a part of every Kaw tranny since the early 70' s, or even before?

 ;)

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline Bergmen

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Re: First valve adjustment
« Reply #27 on: September 03, 2017, 02:50:22 pm »
Interesting D
I'm a bit surprised.... but not amazed,  :great:
Thanks for showing that pic also...
I don't call "ball" feature a neutral "finder" tho, I call it an "upshift lockout" mechanism...

Now for the million dollar question....
Can anyone explain why it exists, and why it has been a part of every Kaw tranny since the early 70' s, or even before?

 ;)


As far as I can recall, there were some bikes that were difficult to get into neutral at a stop with the engine running and in first (or second). It would just jump back and forth, very frustrating. I experienced this on several Japanese motorcycles from the 60s, 70, and 80s. I think Kawasaki came up with this as an answer.

IMO, the cure for this had to do with the neutral and gear arm detent springs as well as much higher quality clutch designs. When I was building the ZGRX, I strengthened both springs, removed the 3 balls shown there and never had a single issue with finding neutral at a stop in whatever gear I was in (1st or 2nd). It also did not hamper up or down shifting. Another benefit was very positive indexing while shifting, which was one of the goals of the Factory Pro ball bearing shift arm I also installed (with a stronger spring):



In the stock setup, the neutral index arm spring was slightly weaker than the gear index arm spring (I know, because I accidentally installed them backwards during the first build, they only differed visually by being painted different colors). The Factory Pro kit included a stronger gear arm spring so I moved the stock gear arm spring over to the nuetral arm. Shazam, perfect shifting.

Also, back in the day (60s, 70s, 80s, etc.), the wet clutches on Japanese bikes were not all that great. They would not completely release, especially when cold and they would often chatter near full engagement. This may have been an incentive for Kawasaki to invent the neutral finder.

Dan
--2014 Yamaha FJR1300A--
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Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: First valve adjustment
« Reply #28 on: September 03, 2017, 07:49:14 pm »
Thanks Dan
I'm waiting for someone to send me the pictures I had,.that would actually explain visually the reason for the balls....
I looked on all 3 computers I have running, and can't find the pics, and thought I had them up on photobuttkit, but was wrong..

As soon as I get them I'll start another thread about this, and place a link here to direct to it...

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: First valve adjustment
« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2017, 09:29:32 pm »

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline KellyfromVA

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Re: First valve adjustment
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2017, 09:57:06 am »
I'm going to attempt my first valve adjustment this weekend. A few questions. Other than a head gasket, what other gaskets should I replace while I'm in there?  I saw a reed valve block of kit from Murph. Is it worth it to do?

Something that I ran into when doing my first valve adjustment, involved getting the valve cover seal/gasket to stay in the groove along the top of the valve cover, especially in the front.  A piece of plastic that helps direct heat around the radiator stuck back just enough, that it kept pushing the gasket into the engine.  Before you're ready to carefully maneuver the valve cover between the frame and the engine, reach up with your thumb, and make sure the black plastic shield is pushed forward as far as it will move.  Then, when you put the valve cover back on, I took a flashlight and inspection mirror to make sure the gasket/seal is still in the groove before putting on the valve cover bolts.

Another suggestion came from Steve:  I highly recommend buying and using two feeler gauges, for setting both valves (exhaust-exhaust intake-intake) per cylinder at the same time.  Trying to jump between both with a single feeler gauge is a PITA.

Good luck!