Author Topic: Getting rid of "the buzz"  (Read 13724 times)

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Offline coffee_brake

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #50 on: July 13, 2014, 02:41:27 am »
As my grips wear, my throttle rocker starts moving on the grip. It's not a big deal, I just twist it around with my left hand on shorter trips.

If it starts slipping on a long trip, I just use a little bit of electrical tape (you DO have that in your tool kit, don't you?) to hold it in place.
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Offline Ride&time

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #51 on: July 21, 2014, 04:36:23 am »
I had read a post and someone stated they added a spoonful of TW3 or 2 stroke oil to a tank of gas. I do use Lucas upper engine lubricant. I do notice a differance. My bike gets slightly smoother with it. Been doing this on occasion for over a year now. Haven't fully read this post, maybe someone has mentioned something like this?

Offline jettawreck

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #52 on: July 21, 2014, 12:25:18 pm »
I had read a post and someone stated they added a spoonful of TW3 or 2 stroke oil to a tank of gas. I do use Lucas upper engine lubricant. I do notice a differance. My bike gets slightly smoother with it. Been doing this on occasion for over a year now. Haven't fully read this post, maybe someone has mentioned something like this?

The main purpose of the two stroke oil added to the gas is to help prevent the gas in the carbs causing things to film over and get sticky when it sits a bit.
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Offline stevedap

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #53 on: July 21, 2014, 07:40:24 pm »
Maybe I said this already, but that is the great part about getting older...everything is starting to seem new again 

Unless you have already tired it and hate them try one of the many items that fit the throttle grip to help you by pushing with the palm of your hand. Mine is called cramp buster, but I am sure many name brands exist. Mine was in the drawer for about 2 years after I purchased it since I primarily drive in a busy city commuting to work. What I found was I no longer had to really grip the grip and it feels more like the left hand now resting on the bar instead of squeezing it. The result is the vibration feeling is basically gone in comparison. I think it cost something like $3 or $4 bucks on Amazon, and the best bang for the buck so far that I have experienced.

I tried a CrampBuster for the first time on a 250 mile trip on Sunday and was so pleased with how it worked that I'm thinking of getting a second one for the left grip. It pretty well stopped my hand from cramping up and virtually eliminated the buzz. I left it on while riding in the city and had no problems, to the point that I forgot it's even there. My first two fingers can grip and rotate the throttle in front of the CrampBuster whenever I want. The part that rests against the heel of my palm is perfectly curved to fit my palm. No moving parts, no wires, no switches, nothing to break or corrode. Should last for years. 
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Offline Ride&time

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #54 on: July 22, 2014, 05:18:30 am »
Thats interesting about the two stroke oil in regards to helping to prevent the carbs from guming up. The Lucas upper cylinder lubricant may also help with that as well. It does say it has injector cleaners. Don't know how it could, it seems mild. Like using ethanol free gas though its just another expense.

It is comforting to know my bike can be running as it should and have a bit of vibration. Still can look in the mirror and have no problem seeing very accurately. There are bikes much worse with the vibration, And some better.

Mark

Offline ChrisCarroll_ON

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"/ Two Stroke Oil Addition to Fuel
« Reply #55 on: October 20, 2014, 01:42:33 pm »
That's interesting about the 2 stroke oil. I had a mechanic tell me that he uses 2 stroke as a fuel stablilizer (instead of fuel stabilizer) when he stores his bike for the winter. I checked with the American Petroleum Institute (API) and they had never heard of it....and strongly suggested I stick with the normal stabilizer. Is there any downside to using a little oil in the gas?

Offline SmokinRZ

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #56 on: October 20, 2014, 02:23:12 pm »
Has anyone tried the grip accessory called beemer buddies?   

Offline AirMonger

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #57 on: October 21, 2014, 11:19:14 am »
I have them on my bike. They work well if you like a thicker grip vs. thin OEM style. They deteriorate pretty quickly. Mine look bad with less than six months of use (I cover my bike at work).
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Offline SmokinRZ

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #58 on: October 21, 2014, 01:47:56 pm »
Thanks, I think I will just look for different (bigger) grips if they don't last long.  I took off my 86 shortie bars and put back the stock bars and the buzz increased.   

Offline SamSam

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #59 on: October 21, 2014, 02:19:49 pm »
I have had very good luck with with beemer buddies over foam grips.   
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Offline Jorge

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #60 on: October 21, 2014, 02:44:19 pm »
Not all Connies "feel" the same.
Last year, coming back from the Spider Ride, Jon (1999) and I (2005) swapped for about an hour or so. Bikes felt completely different. Neither was really better, they were just different. The buzz was not bad on either, but as you went through the gears, you could feel the pegs and grips vibrate at different speeds between the two bikes.
Maybe it has to do with how well the pistons, rods, etc. are matched.
No complaints about mine.
One thing I'm not sure I saw in the thread was about not gripping with a death grip. I do find that if I tighten my grip, vibrations get a lot wors on hands.
Jorge

Offline BBroj

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #61 on: October 21, 2014, 04:44:59 pm »
My '06 buzz got noticeably worse when I switched to Heli bars. I have added heavier bar end weights, and done valve adjusts and carb syncs since, but no improvement.  My engine mount bolts are all there, shimmed and tightened correctly. Does anyone know if there is aisle a torque spec and order for the Heli bars? I have loosened and re-snugged them, but it's still the same. It's been awhile,  so time to do another valve adjust/carb sync and go through the list again....
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Offline SmokinRZ

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #62 on: October 21, 2014, 07:20:25 pm »
Not all Connies "feel" the same.
Last year, coming back from the Spider Ride, Jon (1999) and I (2005) swapped for about an hour or so. Bikes felt completely different. Neither was really better, they were just different. The buzz was not bad on either, but as you went through the gears, you could feel the pegs and grips vibrate at different speeds between the two bikes.
Maybe it has to do with how well the pistons, rods, etc. are matched.
No complaints about mine.
One thing I'm not sure I saw in the thread was about not gripping with a death grip. I do find that if I tighten my grip, vibrations get a lot wors on hands.
Jorge

My 91 was so smooth I thought this forum was a bunch whiners  :nananana:  Then I got my 05  :-[  and I was scared it had a bent rod, but no, just the buzz. 

Offline worncog

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #63 on: October 22, 2014, 03:14:02 pm »
My '06 buzz got noticeably worse when I switched to Heli bars. I have added heavier bar end weights, and done valve adjusts and carb syncs since, but no improvement.  My engine mount bolts are all there, shimmed and tightened correctly. Does anyone know if there is aisle a torque spec and order for the Heli bars? I have loosened and re-snugged them, but it's still the same. It's been awhile,  so time to do another valve adjust/carb sync and go through the list again....

I've done the list on my 06 and she still buzzes a bit. I adjusted the buzz down to lower rpms during a sync, away from my typical cruising rpm, to make it tolerable. I really don't notice it at freeway speeds after moving the buzz down to around 2500 rpms.
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Offline BBroj

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #64 on: October 22, 2014, 09:12:32 pm »
Speaking of carb sync and specific RPM's, I thought the lower the RPM's you could keep the bike running and sync the carbs, the more accurate the synchronization. Does performing the sync at highway RPM's actually help the buzz, and if so, why?
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Offline Scott

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #65 on: October 23, 2014, 06:37:52 pm »
I see posts here that talk about shimming the left upper engine bolt only. Is that the left side as you sit on the bike or the left side standing in front of it? I ask because working on cars it's as you sit in it, left would be drivers side. I noticed one of my upper engine mount bolts missing and it has a gap between the engine and the frame so this would be the side that needs to be shimmed. The bolt that is missing on mine is on the right side if your sitting on the bike. Is this the correct side to shim?

Offline WillyP

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #66 on: October 23, 2014, 06:45:48 pm »
Left is always from the point of view of sitting on the bike.
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Offline zg2002-Murph2

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #67 on: October 23, 2014, 07:36:28 pm »
Building a true rubber isolated handlebar mount works. Between less pressure and very little vibe left I have no symptoms of vibrations in hands even after riding for long stretches of over 70 mph.
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Offline worncog

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #68 on: October 23, 2014, 07:54:19 pm »
I see posts here that talk about shimming the left upper engine bolt only. Is that the left side as you sit on the bike or the left side standing in front of it? I ask because working on cars it's as you sit in it, left would be drivers side. I noticed one of my upper engine mount bolts missing and it has a gap between the engine and the frame so this would be the side that needs to be shimmed. The bolt that is missing on mine is on the right side if your sitting on the bike. Is this the correct side to shim?

Missing bolt?? You need to check all the engine mount bolts. Torque the right and shim the left, upper forward bolts that is.

Speaking of carb sync and specific RPM's, I thought the lower the RPM's you could keep the bike running and sync the carbs, the more accurate the synchronization. Does performing the sync at highway RPM's actually help the buzz, and if so, why?

I sync mine at 4k rpm and it runs very smooth at that speed. SISF may chime in, but I found that sync'ing at this rpm, where I spend the most time out on the slab and such, allows the engine to operate optimally at that speed.
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Offline Scott

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #69 on: October 23, 2014, 10:31:17 pm »
Handyman, yes it is the engine mounting bolt on the right side. Mine seems to be the opposite. The left side is tight to the frame and the right side has the gap where I would need to shim it and replace the mounting bolt.

Offline turbojoe78_MA

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #70 on: October 24, 2014, 11:59:00 am »
Handyman, yes it is the engine mounting bolt on the right side. Mine seems to be the opposite. The left side is tight to the frame and the right side has the gap where I would need to shim it and replace the mounting bolt.

Get a new bolt for the right side and put it in without tightening it, loosen the left side bolt and then torque the right side to spec.

Now shim the left side and then torque to spec.

And do check and torque your lower rear mounting bolts.
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Offline DonH_NH

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #71 on: October 25, 2014, 01:20:07 am »
Can the upper two engine mounting bolts be accessed without taking the side fairings off?  If like to check mine and was wondering how much work it would be to get to them.  Also, what do you all use for a whim,
If one is needed?

Thanks for your help!

Offline turbojoe78_MA

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #72 on: October 25, 2014, 11:47:40 am »
Can the upper two engine mounting bolts be accessed without taking the side fairings off?  If like to check mine and was wondering how much work it would be to get to them.  Also, what do you all use for a whim,
If one is needed?

Thanks for your help!

You should be able to get to the upper mounting bolts with the side plastics on and you can use any washers you have around that fit for shimming the left side.

I have one of the OEM shims and an additional washer on mine to take up all the space between the engine mount and the frame.
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Offline zg2002-Murph2

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #73 on: October 25, 2014, 12:02:06 pm »
Don, take the lowers off and do a good visual inspection on everything.

A pencil/marker outline on a cardboard then punch small holes(smaller than screw so they don't fall out) where the screws are. There are several different screw sizes, but a simple job.

Only takes about 30 minutes to Remove/Replace lowers and belly pan, and you can clean out the bugs and dust while you are there. Consider doing it while doing your next oil change unless you need to get in there quickly due to concern.
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Offline Jorge

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Re: Getting rid of "the buzz"
« Reply #74 on: October 25, 2014, 12:13:15 pm »
I hope Steve jumps in...
Throttle opening at 4,000 RPM no-load is drastically different than throttle opening at 4,00) RPM and 70 MPH. Now if you could sync the carbs at 4,000 RPM in  dyno, with load, then you would be doing it the same as when riding
I suspect that doing it at idle and at 4,000 will give about the samw rwsultaq.
Jorge