Author Topic: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?  (Read 4637 times)

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Offline ConcoursKZ

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How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« on: July 17, 2016, 02:16:59 pm »
When you consider you can pick up a great running C10 for around $2000. Has luggage space for two. Easy to work on. Very comfortable for 2 up. Great gas mileage and capacity. Maybe the most dependable motor out there. More than enough speed. Great in rough weather. Will run all day and all night. Ability to go well over 100,000 miles. Aftermarket parts and ability to find good used parts are everywhere. Online support might be second to none. A young couple could cruise the country with confidence at a budget. And I don't think I have ever seen a rider under 40 on one. You would think clubs of C10 younger people would be out there traversing across the country. It might be the perfect camping bike. Probably the best value in used Motorcycles today. Wish we had something like it when I was young.
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Offline Harry Martin

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2016, 03:37:02 pm »
My 17 year old son is now riding one of two C10s at my house.
My youngest son has his eye on the second Connie. Dad supervises on a C14.

Is that young enough?  ;D
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Offline alan

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2016, 04:02:29 pm »
Uh, styling, weight, cool factor....  Grandson has just started riding on a CBR 125, he's taller and way stronger than me (junior weightlifter) throws a leg over the connie and says "Whoa, what does this thing weigh?".  No cool factor - big blocky styling; never see a connie on the MotoGP tv show....although the younger set seem to "get" the 80's UJM's.  She is, like the Valkyrie or other antiques, an acquired taste.
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Offline Sparkie

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2016, 04:36:07 pm »
Um, maybe because it doesn't have any computers onboard.  Completely old school.  :great:
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Offline rick

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2016, 06:30:10 pm »
A relic of the analog age.  No cool graphics.  No one else their age riding one.  Cyclops headlight.  Heavy, heavy, heavy.  No youtube videos of anyone stunt riding them.  Kawasaki does not have a motogp presence.  Young people really don't tour, they commute or sport ride. 

If I was in my 20's, I'd be eyeing a Honda Repsol replica instead (CBR).
« Last Edit: July 17, 2016, 08:16:20 pm by rick »

Offline Outback Jon

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2016, 07:26:08 pm »
And I don't think I have ever seen a rider under 40 on one.
A was 31 when I bought my first C10.  Wrecked myself and the bike, recovered, and bought my second one when I was 34.  Sure, now I'm over 40...
Quote from: rick
Young people really don't tour.  They commute or sport ride.
That's probably the biggest reason.  Although the C10 is an excellent commuter bike if you need to bring stuff with you.  I purchase my lunch box/coolers primarily on the basis of if they'll fit in the saddlebags.
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Offline Vandelay

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2016, 08:08:28 pm »
I'm 31 and picked mine up in February. Just finished a 2100 mile week long tour on it.
I'd always wanted a touring bike and until I can afford a BMW 1200 I'm absolutely loving this thing. I now know what I need to do to make it a better tourer but man did I have fun.
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Offline Dan LT

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2016, 08:17:55 pm »
Circled Lake Michigan on my C-10 this past Friday into Saturday. If I wasn't completely sold on this bike before, I am now !    No better touring motorcycle out there.  As far as young people are concerned, I agree with what's been said, but I'll add to that................young people, for the most part, aren't going to be motorcyclists.  In my travels the vast majority of riders are older.  It's just like the cars. If you see a nice sport or a 60's thru 80's muscle car coming down the road the driver will have grey hair 95% of the time.  The young like video and texting.  You can't text and talk on the phone on a bike very easily and you're out in the weather. No air conditioning !!!!!!!!!!!!       :motonoises:
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Offline ConcoursKZ

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2016, 08:20:49 pm »
I'm 31 and picked mine up in February. Just finished a 2100 mile week long tour on it.
I'd always wanted a touring bike and until I can afford a BMW 1200 I'm absolutely loving this thing. I now know what I need to do to make it a better tourer but man did I have fun.

Why don't people your age and younger tour? The way times are changing exploring this country on two wheels might be limited. I see young people buying old Air Streams and Campers. I hear that tent camping is way up.

Young People need to put the phone down and get on a bike!
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Offline Rev Ryder

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2016, 08:29:57 pm »
Street bikes, especially big mamas like Connie, are pretty hard to drift. 
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Offline KellyfromVA

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2016, 10:43:24 pm »
Simple two word answer: Not Cool.

Offline Dr. Funkenstein

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2016, 01:25:03 pm »
I got my first C10 when I was 29 and I will always have one.  It is true that the bike doesn't have that "cool factor" for impressing non riders.  An old sport tourer is not a chick magnet or an ego booster.  Almost all riders I talk to respect the C10 for its capability and value.  It is just a good cheap bike that will run forever if you take care of it.  That's about as cool as it gets in my book.  It's also pretty nice to be able to do almost all of your grocery shopping on your bike.  That being said, I never considered a bike with bags until I had no car.  Something like a Connie is probably not on the radar of most young riders unless their situation demands it.
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Offline WillyP

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2016, 01:37:03 pm »
But yet, the cult thing would be that they are cool specifically because they are so un-cool.
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Offline JohnJuan

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2016, 02:04:35 pm »
26 here, I've been putting 10k a year on my Z1000 for the last 3 years. It works for touring, and It was shiny and new when I got it.

Offline ZX6Rob

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2016, 06:27:11 pm »
The millenial crowd (of which I'm a member) are collectively turning toward retro-standards and scramblers these days.  Most younger folks I know and ride with are big on Triumph Bonnevilles, MotoGuzzi 7s, Ducati's Scrambler, and occasionally (for the trust-fund babies) BMW's R nineT and derivatives.  In the used market, most people are still hopped up on the '70s look -- vintage CBs, XJs, and such abound.  There's still a decent smattering of people that like sport bikes, but that crowd is entirely wowed by numbers and latest-and-greatest figures and measurements.  I rode a cherry '84 GPz900R for several years, selling it just about a year ago, and I just though it was about the coolest bike there was.  A shining reminder of one of the most triumphant sport motorcycles ever conceived, and a real game-changer for the market as a whole in its time!  But, the retro enthusiasts thought it was ugly, reminiscent of the worst characteristics of the decade of excess, and the sportbike guys were just convinced that it was slow, since it wouldn't run the quarter as fast as a cross-plane R1.

The Connie's in that same boat.  Where I absolutely adore its slab-sided styling, functional appointments, and stout, reliable nature, most of the younger crowd pass it over.  When you're young and (in all likelihood) single, the qualities you look for in a bike are the visceral ones.  You want the style and the prestige, the look that will draw the eye of your peers, or you want the absolute highest level of wrist-breaking performance (whether you are capable or not of actually exploiting it).  The sensible, somewhat laid-back, useful, heavy, no-nonsense Concours, well...  I can sing her praises all day to folks'd listen, but it doesn't make her more attractive to the folks in my generation.
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Offline ConcoursKZ

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2016, 10:15:02 pm »
The millenial crowd (of which I'm a member) are collectively turning toward retro-standards and scramblers these days.  Most younger folks I know and ride with are big on Triumph Bonnevilles, MotoGuzzi 7s, Ducati's Scrambler, and occasionally (for the trust-fund babies) BMW's R nineT and derivatives.  In the used market, most people are still hopped up on the '70s look -- vintage CBs, XJs, and such abound.  There's still a decent smattering of people that like sport bikes, but that crowd is entirely wowed by numbers and latest-and-greatest figures and measurements.  I rode a cherry '84 GPz900R for several years, selling it just about a year ago, and I just though it was about the coolest bike there was.  A shining reminder of one of the most triumphant sport motorcycles ever conceived, and a real game-changer for the market as a whole in its time!  But, the retro enthusiasts thought it was ugly, reminiscent of the worst characteristics of the decade of excess, and the sportbike guys were just convinced that it was slow, since it wouldn't run the quarter as fast as a cross-plane R1.

The Connie's in that same boat.  Where I absolutely adore its slab-sided styling, functional appointments, and stout, reliable nature, most of the younger crowd pass it over.  When you're young and (in all likelihood) single, the qualities you look for in a bike are the visceral ones.  You want the style and the prestige, the look that will draw the eye of your peers, or you want the absolute highest level of wrist-breaking performance (whether you are capable or not of actually exploiting it).  The sensible, somewhat laid-back, useful, heavy, no-nonsense Concours, well...  I can sing her praises all day to folks'd listen, but it doesn't make her more attractive to the folks in my generation.

Do you think they pass on the C10 because they they have no concept of the Sport Touring Class? While the old CBs, GPz900, XS 650, and other Vintage stuff from the early 80's are great bikes and have there place. You just are not going to jump on one and do a cross country trip. To ride a 750 Four across the country in 4 or 5 days you have to be in great riding shape. The elements will tear you up. I know as I did it several times 30 years ago.

I still say if you want to tour the country on a bike a C10 for $1750 cannot be beat. It would not be my only Bike at age 25 to 35. But I think many young riders are missing a phenomenal opportunity to tour the country or take some really great long weekend trips for give away prices. Ever ride a GPz900 loaded up with a backpack full of gear 400 miles on Friday and ride back 400 on Sunday? You are going to be beat Monday morning. You do the same  on a C10 and you will be standing tall at the water cooler telling others about the great trip you had this weekend. I won't even get into two up riding.

By the way that's less than 3 tanks of gas on a C10. And under $40.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2016, 10:20:45 pm by ConcoursKZ »
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Offline ZX6Rob

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2016, 04:37:39 pm »
Do you think they pass on the C10 because they they have no concept of the Sport Touring Class? While the old CBs, GPz900, XS 650, and other Vintage stuff from the early 80's are great bikes and have there place. You just are not going to jump on one and do a cross country trip. To ride a 750 Four across the country in 4 or 5 days you have to be in great riding shape. The elements will tear you up. I know as I did it several times 30 years ago.
No, I think plenty of them acknowledge that it exists, but I also think the class offers little for them.  Most people in my age bracket don't do multi-day cross-country trips.  Their motorcycles are there to get them to work, to ride to the bar, and to go on short blasts down back-roads.  In fact, of all of the people I regularly ride with, only one other person has any interest in what would be considered touring riding.  It's just not on their radar.  Sport-touring bikes are a compromise, and the people who are purely interested in only one-half of that label always think that they offer too much of the other half.  Sportbike riders see sport-tourers as offering too much in the way of comfort and stability, at the expense of all-out performance, whereas full-dress touring riders find the concessions toward corner-carving get in the way of uninterrupted hours of slab-riding.

I don't think the sport-touring class of bikes has ever been properly appreciated, by any age bracket, really.  Too many people are willing to write them off as compromised, rather than realizing these kinds of motorcycles have their own attributes and strengths, too.

Quote
I still say if you want to tour the country on a bike a C10 for $1750 cannot be beat. It would not be my only Bike at age 25 to 35. But I think many young riders are missing a phenomenal opportunity to tour the country or take some really great long weekend trips for give away prices. Ever ride a GPz900 loaded up with a backpack full of gear 400 miles on Friday and ride back 400 on Sunday? You are going to be beat Monday morning. You do the same  on a C10 and you will be standing tall at the water cooler telling others about the great trip you had this weekend. I won't even get into two up riding.

By the way that's less than 3 tanks of gas on a C10. And under $40.
So, that's true, if you're looking to tour, the C10 is a fantastic machine.  Bang for the buck, it's better than anything out there, even the C14.  It's inexpensive, parts are everywhere, there's a good dealer and support network, and it's still a capable ride even compared to other sporting machines.  But if you're looking for something sleek and sexy to ride half an hour to the bar after work, it's overkill.  It's big and heavy, and not as fast as your buddy's ZX-10R, and not as good-looking as your other buddy's '74 CB750 café racer.  Connie's just selling something that most people my age aren't interested in.  Out of everyone in my immediate and extended circle of riding friends within my age group, I am the only person I know who has ever done more than a day ride at once.  And even then, the people that have participated in 3-hour-plus rides were doing it as part of something like a poker run or charity event, where there was plenty of stopping and resting between 20- to 30-minute freeway blasts. 

I never took my GPz900R on any long trips, because it was too valuable to me and in too good a condition for me to risk anything happening to it, but I did take my ZX-6R supersport on a nine-hour non-stop ride from Phoenix, AZ to Ouray, CO.  And yeah, I was utterly destroyed by that ride.  My back felt terrible for a month afterward, and that experience was the exact reason I ended up buying a Concours.  I thought, "I really liked that long ride, but man, I want to do it on something that doesn't feel like it's actively trying to kill me!"  Bought a Concours the week after I got back.  But when I tell people I ride with about this all-day ride, this week-long motorcycle trip I took, they're all like, "Ugh, why?  Why would you ever do that to yourself?"  There's just not that much interest in all-day touring.  I think it's just an older man's game, really, and I've always been a bit of an old soul.

I end up taking flak from people about my Connie, or at least having to explain why I'm riding an "old man bike" sometimes.  I was in Chipotle the other day, with my Connie parked out front, and two 20-something dudebros showed up on a CBR600RR and a GSX-R600.  As they were standing outside smoking, one pointed at my bike.

"Hey, man, would you ever ride anything like that?" he asked his friend.

"F*$% no, man," the other guy replied after snorting derisively.

Now, personally, I don't care one way or the other.  I've been catching s#$% from people about my ride since I started.  My Ninja 250R got called "a girl's bike," "something my mom would ride", and "training wheels" (which, to be fair to that last one, it was...) by people I barely knew.  My GPz900R was, in my eyes, one of the coolest, most iconic motorcycles of all time, but everyone else just called it "that ugly '80s bike", and even when I had the cool-guy bike, the ZX-6R, it was "oh, yeah, well, you'll be ready for a big-boy bike like an R1 or something soon".  Now, I have a comfortable, sporty, long-distance, reliable motorcycle in Connie, but I went through a lot of BS to get there, and I'm still catching it now. 

A lot of people my age don't want to deal with that, so no matter what the good qualities of a sport-tourer, they'll contort themselves on to a ratty café bike or an ultrapowerful race machine, and because they're young and limber, they'll deal with the uncomfortable qualities because those machines are cool.  They look like something James Dean would ride, or else they look like they're about to transform into a robot suit piloted by a Japanese schoolgirl, whatever floats your boat.  Motorcycles in the U.S. specifically have never, ever been about practicality and sense.  They're cool, rebellious machines ridden by cool, rebellious people.  Or, at least, they're supposed to be.  Connie exists quietly alongside those sexy hypermachines and cool retro-throwbacks, content to sit back and say, "It's fine.  Get it out of your system, and when your back starts to hurt and your wrists can't handle those clip-ons any more, when the price of insurance and the cost of tires and maintenance starts to get to you, I'll be here."
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Offline GKreamer

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2016, 05:38:52 pm »
Well said!

Offline Cape Fear

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2016, 07:41:58 pm »
...Connie exists quietly alongside those sexy hypermachines and cool retro-throwbacks, content to sit back and say, "It's fine.  Get it out of your system, and when your back starts to hurt and your wrists can't handle those clip-ons any more, when the price of insurance and the cost of tires and maintenance starts to get to you, I'll be here."

Hey this forum needs a like button!  :great:

Offline ron203

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2016, 08:25:18 pm »
Like +2  (you know what I mean)! :iagree:
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Offline DC Concours

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2016, 03:36:28 am »
Beautifully stated.

...Connie exists quietly alongside those sexy hypermachines and cool retro-throwbacks, content to sit back and say, "It's fine.  Get it out of your system, and when your back starts to hurt and your wrists can't handle those clip-ons any more, when the price of insurance and the cost of tires and maintenance starts to get to you, I'll be here."

Offline VTconnie

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2016, 06:09:42 pm »
Yeah everything mentioned is on-point. I bought my first 2000 C10 in 2012 when I was 25. I did lots of research for the touring bike I needed to get me home from California to New England. The Concours beat out the ST1100 because of price, and after having seen an ST in person years later, I am glad I picked the Concours.

My first bike was one of those vintage "CB's" that were mentioned, I learned on a 900. So I am at home with big bikes. After my several thousand mile "Break in" run home from CA, I fell in love with the Concours. She is my everything bike, rarely do I don the saddle bags anymore but knowing I can carry days of camping supplies is amazing. As other might have seen, I run about as minimal a Concours as possible, just the upper fairing and not even fairing pockets! I love the appearance of the engine, and she is the centerpiece. If someone in person doesn't like how she looks, them fightin' words. For most people she turns heads, especially women. If the "Dudebro" crowd has any doubts, maybe passing them in 4th gear howling like the hounds of hell at triple digit speeds with my visor up and a relaxed seating position, will put them in their place.

Is she big? you bet. Just the way I like them.
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Offline capitaleno

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2016, 09:45:58 am »
I agree with had been said before.  But most people learn on a smaller bike and are told not to upgrade until they have fully master it.  Let's face it, no one has been able to master a motorcycle because even the professional crash.  I learn on a Honda Cub 50cc and it did it's job beautifully.  Eventually I moved up to a 135CC engine which was great.  Being from a foreign country where a bike over 250CC is over killed, it is discouraging to know that in the states bigger is better and finding a fun, smaller bike is nearly impossible.  In high school I jump on a friend's GSXR 1100  and nearly killed myself so I purchase a 250 and that served me just find for years.  The Vulcan 800 I currently have is not as fun or faster than the kawa 250, so why get a bigger bike.  I got the Connie because now in my 40's, I care about comfort and like to carry stuff with me and not on a backpack.  I have little time to ride so when I do, I want to be in the saddle as long as possible and not cleaning the chain, etc.  The Connie offers the range, comfort and reliability to let me enjoy the few hours I have available.

 

Offline ron203

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #23 on: July 21, 2016, 10:20:47 am »
I've been following this with great interest and especially the comments from the newer and younger riders. Keep it up. I want to learn more.

We talk all the time at work about the Millennials, etc. and how they start businesses (or not), shop, socialize, work (or not). They don't look at things the way we do. My 24 year old is interested in bikes, but I've got nothing he can start on, certainly not a C-14 but he insists that I not buy an old bike for him to learn on. He wants to do it himself. Wonder where he got that sense of pride? Hmm. My 26 year daughter is interested but would rather spend her money on travel than riding but if she didn't live in Boston, she'd have a bike and would ride wit me. She rides pillion with me when she's in town but would rather be in charge! My 30 year old would rather write, game, and compute than anything else. I don't know if anyone in my family will follow my hobby or not. Maybe.

I hope our new marketing manager Fais is watching this and if not, will pick up on it when he gets back from whatever he's doing. He's younger than most of us and maybe he can connect. Maybe there's something we can do to invite our younger family members to be guests at events. I've seen a few guys doing that at RTE's and the COGgers have been very welcoming. Keep it up guys. Lots of maybes.

I've noticed in following the industry releases, ads, new models like the ones from Kawa for "shorter riders" and the number of younger and female riders in commercials that the industry realizes that the aging boomers are not the future of the sport.  The ads have younger people and the shorter bikes are unspokenly aimed at women who typically are smaller in stature.

If we are serious about helping promote our hobby, maybe we can think of some ways to include some younger blood. Maybe that PokeMon Go Run is not a bad idea...  ;)   Maybe, maybe, maybe...

If you love your hobby, talk to someone younger about it and invite them to an event. Or...I don't know. Just do something.
2014 C-14
2008 Goldwing

Offline NYbiomed

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Re: How Come The C10 Isn't A Young Rider Cult Yet?
« Reply #24 on: July 21, 2016, 11:16:24 am »
    Excellent read ZX6Rob!....a fully faired, Samsonite laden C10's look like an old man's ride and are NOT cool looking, but practicality and youth are often exclusive from each other. It'll be interesting to see if younger riders begin to gravitate to the C14's when they enter the $3-4k realm, which is only a couple years away now. I think the 18-21 YO's will still shy away from a 1352cc bike and that's probably not a bad thing- but the C14 has the looks that IMO, pique younger riders interest. It has great styling, a beast of an engine and serious growl with just a $250 aftermarket slip-on. It gets people's attention of all ages, unless the individual is strictly a Harley fan-boy....
    I went to Pat and Sher's COG event a couple months ago and at 46, I was the youngest COG'er there :-\ The average COG member is a paunchy mid or late 50's guy, not a young....or fit :D crowd, but surely experienced and well-seasoned.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2016, 11:19:32 am by NYbiomed »
2002 Honda VTR1000F SuperHawk
2009 Kawasaki Concours 14 ABS
1999 Suzuki Katana 750   1993 Yamaha Seca II
1990 Kawasaki EX500      1983 Honda CB1000 Custom