Author Topic: low speed steering resistance  (Read 449 times)

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Offline Greenie

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low speed steering resistance
« on: August 01, 2019, 09:02:50 pm »
Lately at low speeds the handlebars occasionally resist my input to initiate a turn. The bike feels like it takes more pressure than normal to do a low speed turn. The bike only has 24K miles, there is no play in the triple tree bearings, and with the front tire raised the bars swing easily from side to side without any sign of binding. The front wheel bearings feel tight but I have a new set from Murph's ready to install. No play in the front wheel bearings with the calipers off.
The tires are more worn than I usually ever allow - again, a new front tire awaiting install and a new rear Commander II on the way.
This is hard to explain but it feels as if the bike does not want to lean at low speeds - just to track straight. It's not a good feeling.
At speed the bike handles fine.
Any thoughts???

Offline KonKours

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Re: low speed steering resistance
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2019, 09:21:49 pm »
Check your rear shock air pressure & suspension sag.  I weigh 190 and keep my shock pressure @ 40 lbs, otherwise handling seems heavy.

- Kevin
- Kevin

'01 C10 ~22K miles (17" meanie, Sonic 1.1kg, GVE)
2009 Yamaha WR450F
1984 Kawasaki Ninja 900

Offline HeavyRotation

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Re: low speed steering resistance
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2019, 10:14:23 pm »
Worn tires will feel like that sometimes, especially if you have worn the middle of your rear tire flat enough to create a "shoulder" it will provide that feeling of resistance just off center as you tip it in.
I like sheds and ninjas.

Online bajasam

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Re: low speed steering resistance
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2019, 10:53:32 pm »
No noise,looseness,vibration, dont worry about it untill you get new rubber and correct air pressure, then see how it feels.

Offline Greenie

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Re: low speed steering resistance
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2019, 10:13:55 pm »
Thanks for the replies! One change I made that helped was to reroute the speedometer cable outside of the chrome loop that is supposed to guide the cable. Turning the bars side to side revealed resistance when the speedometer cable met the limits of the chrome wire loop. The handling problem started when I replaced a broken speedometer core - probably not just a coincidence.

Offline Bob_C_CT

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Re: low speed steering resistance
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2019, 09:58:29 am »
I have a different fork setup but I don't think the speedo is supposed to go through the wire loop just the brake lines, if I remember correctly. Glad you got it figured out.
Southern Connecticut.
97 C10,ZRX Front, Meanstreak rim

Offline connieklr

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Re: low speed steering resistance
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2019, 11:48:00 am »
I have a different fork setup but I don't think the speedo is supposed to go through the wire loop just the brake lines, if I remember correctly. Glad you got it figured out.

Both my Connies ('86 and '95) had the cable passing through the loop when I first got them. Became evident to me with the '86 that the loop put too much stress on the cable when going lock-to-lock, so bypassed/removed the loop on it. Repeated the change when I got the '95.

I noticed that the steering had some resistance to turning on very hot days - IF - I was late with maintenance in re-greasing the tapered roller bearing and adjusting pre-load. Once I got off my duff and did the (messy) deed, that issue went away.

YMMV
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Offline HeavyRotation

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Re: low speed steering resistance
« Reply #7 on: August 19, 2019, 09:18:56 pm »
So was it the tires?
I like sheds and ninjas.

Offline Greenie

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Re: low speed steering resistance
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2019, 08:18:08 am »
I've made 3 changes recently - 1st the speedometer cable came out of the upper loop - that made the biggest improvement. 2nd - new front wheel bearings and a new front tire - both done at the same time with a slight improvement in steering resistance and handling. One wheel bearing had what I call brinelling - notchy inner race rotation felt with the finger. No real play that I could tell. The ride is much more quiet now - the Concours front fender makes an excellent amplifier that gives warning should the rider choose to recognize new sounds.
I still have the rear tire (and rear wheel bearings) to replace next week. All things considered, I'm on the right track.
The front tire (Michelin Road Pilot 4) gave 16,000 miles of service and still had some life left in it.