Author Topic: Preparation for Guatemala  (Read 679 times)

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Offline GeoffreyH

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Preparation for Guatemala
« on: August 08, 2017, 09:24:21 am »
Hello,

I have my Concours now!  Beautiful! 1999 in excellent condition.  I am now prepping for the trip.  I would like feedback of the basic system checks I should do on the bike.  The ones I can do myself considering I have average mechanical skill.  Wheel bearings, change of fluids, brake pads are in my realm.  Carbs and major engine work I would leave to the pros.  I am concerned with fuel issues!  Is there anything I can do to avoid fuel contamination?  Do I rebuild the fuel petcock?  I have read the articles on inline fuel filters.  From the articles I understand that some of you recommend them others do not.

One thing in particular has got me;  the bike did not come with a tool kit.  I have no idea what is in the tool kit and therefore I do not know what I should put together.  Weight is an issue on such a long trip and redundancy is not what I want.  Please advise on specific tools I must have. 

The bike also came with rather inexpensive but new tires.  I will replace them prior to entering Mexico.  Tires are so important and I would like opinions on the proper tires to get when riding on roads that will sometimes be very rough.  I do not plan on doing much gravel riding but there will be times that this is inevitable.

If there is anyone in the group that has made the trip?  I would love to hear from you!

Thank you in advance!

Geoffrey

Offline worncog

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2017, 10:50:31 am »
I use an in-line filter. It has a cleanable brass element and has worked fine for me. Some have said it can cause flow issues, but it did not exhibit any running 98mph all the way across South Dakota. I was running from a large storm system. :)

I would rebuild the petcock. I recommend rebuilding the petcock every 3 or 4 years. Murphskits sells a rebuild kit. Based on the fact that I had another bike puke a couple gallon of gas in my garage a while back. Wife really liked the fragrance it gave the house.

Tool kit? If you are doing all, or most, of the work yourself set a box next to your work and keep all the tools you use during the process in that box. When your done, sort the tools and decide what you really need. Sometimes strange tools have secondary uses. The long tire iron I carry has never been used to spoon a tire out on the road, but it sure came in handy digging mud out of the front fender last year after coming to a standstill. And don't shortcut on the flat repair kit.

Lots of opinions on tool kits, but I like to be prepared to fix any possible issue. I do find myself in some very remote locations at times.

Somewhere far away. Soon
Overland Expo, BVF, ...another BDR?

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Offline Jim

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2017, 11:21:24 am »
Here's a link to a recent thread on tools for the road.  Do a search on "tool kit" and you'll have plenty of suggestions.

http://forum.cog-online.org/concours-c10-zg1000-general-chat-and-tech/my-compilation-of-tool-kit-lists/

Offline GeoffreyH

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2017, 06:35:35 pm »
Thank you for responding!  Its good to know you all are out there!  Today I'm a little nervous about the trip.  I'm riding from Maine, alone.  The more I read the nervouser I get!

Offline Victor Salisbury

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2017, 07:05:04 pm »
I'd recommend changing the front wheel bearings, the '94 and up bearings are a little less substantial than the pre 94 bearings. Most of us have adopted an every other front tire change, change the bearings as preventative mx. And get the good ones from Murph, or NSK brand, anything less will not last. 
Vic Salisbury
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Stupid Hurts! Wearing protective gear is much more comfortable.

Offline MotoCommuter

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2017, 07:58:11 pm »
The link provide has just about everything. Question is, how much are you capable of doing? I would carry enough to do your basic maintanence. Before you go pull your tires off, change your oil, spark plugs, coolant, final drive oil, brake pads and make sure you tighten every thing and like the previous poster said, set aside those tools to carry with you.

I always carried extra cowling screws, windshield nuts, fuses, emergency foot peg, spanner wrench for steering head and blue lock tite.

If the hoses have not been changed, you may want to do that, especially that little short sucker that is conviently placed behind the headers. It's the one that usually fails.

Good luck and post a ride report on the forum, we always like to live thru the adventure of others.
Kurt Brown - SE/AAD/GA
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Offline Locomotiveman

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2017, 02:10:29 am »
Phillips Screw drivers are NOT what one should have. JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) are so-oo much better for those so-called 'Phillips' head screws. Duct tape..good quality Gorilla tape. Good luck.  Locomotiveman
If the TRUTH is crystal clear..I must need glasses.

Offline Jim

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2017, 12:00:51 pm »
Here's a link for tire discussion (start on the last page for latest info):
http://forum.cog-online.org/tiressuspension-c10/so-what's-the-best-brandmodel-tires-for-the-c10/

You didn't mention what tires you're currently running.  Sometimes, inexpensive doesn't necessarily mean the tires aren't good. 
Just a suggestion:  Select tires that will likely complete the trip and put a couple hundred miles on them before you leave.  If you must replace tires on the way and letting a shop do it, call ahead to make sure your brand and size is waiting for you.  Wing size tires may be a good choice since you'll be covering a lot of highway miles (about 7500 mi round trip?!).  Last thing, be sure to inspect and grease the rear wheel drive splines with a good quality moly grease.  Not the stuff from autozone.  Your local Honda shop will have the good stuff.  It's not cheap, but will last the trip.

Sounds like your going to embark on a real adventure.  Be safe and enjoy! :great:
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 12:12:36 pm by Jim »

Online works4me

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2017, 02:00:46 pm »
Catastrophic failure can happen anywhere, but it's
the failure of the small, seemingly insignificant items
that typically ruin a trip.
From my own personal experience, before embarking,
in addition to what's already been mentioned,
I would service or replace the following:

Fork oil and seals.
The large oil seal in the final drive.
The oil seal in the water pump.
The o-rings in the thermostat and coolant logs.
Definitely rebuild the petcock.
Check the airbox for cracks.
And check your j-box for bad solder connections.

Failure of any of the above would bring an
unnecessary interruption to your trip.
Do the work now for peace of mind.

And be sure to do a shake-down trip before
the big one so there's no surprises.

Good luck. Have fun. Take pictures.




Offline kkja13

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2017, 04:54:40 pm »
Please, do a ride report!
2004 C10
2003 Suzuki SV650s
2000 Kawasaki Eliminator 125 (75mpg!)
1993 Suzuki DR350; 1984 Honda XR200R (RFVC); 1985 Yamaha PW80; 1975 Yamaha DT175;
1974 Honda ST90; 1973 Honda Z50 (first bike, still runs)

Offline dboogie2288

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2017, 10:27:53 am »
I would replace the fuel line and vacuum lines as well.

As far as a toolkit goes, bring as many tools as  you can fit. In my concours, I have two tool roll ups, one in each bag for evening the weight distribution. I have most things that you could need on the side of the road, and then some. Over prepare, and hopefully you'll be set.
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Offline JDM

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2017, 01:51:39 pm »
Thank you for responding!  Its good to know you all are out there!  Today I'm a little nervous about the trip.  I'm riding from Maine, alone.  The more I read the nervouser I get!

How many miles does your Connie have on it? If it is low milage and has been taken care of, don't worry about it. If it were me, I would talk to Murphy and make arrangements with him to send you parts if you need any along the way. I bet Gary would be happy to do that for you. I would advise you to not wash your Connie using a high pressure washer while you are on your trip. HTH
JD   

Offline Mettler1

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2017, 03:06:44 pm »
Thank you for responding!  Its good to know you all are out there!  Today I'm a little nervous about the trip.  I'm riding from Maine, alone.  The more I read the nervouser I get!

    You are in this world ONCE!!!  Better getter done!!!! :great:   Remember the word "ADVENTURE". Whatever happens WILL be part of it. Then you can tell us ALL about it. PLEASE  :motonoises:
« Last Edit: August 13, 2017, 03:11:11 pm by Mettler1 »
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Offline goatmar

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2017, 09:20:46 pm »
Tool kit you can find on Ebay, lots of them usually.  Don't get all wigged out just enjoy the ride, these bikes are pretty bullet proof.
Dave Muzzey  St. Charles, IL  COG#7957  '01 Connie  100K miles and counting

Offline GeoffreyH

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2017, 11:26:34 am »
To all of you who have graciously responded:
Thank you.  So far I have fixed my barn up (much needed) put in a workbench organized tools.  I have replaced the front wheel bearings but decided to take the front forks to a pro...Panickswitch cycles in Brewer Maine.  Great place.  Next is to replace the brake pads...new question scintered versus organic (organics are cheaper and I am on a strict budget).  I'm saving up for good tires. 
Once the front end is complete I'm going back aft to do the rear bearings and brake pads.  Then it will be replacing fluids as you have all mentioned and the guys at panic switch recommended as well.  The bike came with Shinto tires which wobble at certain speeds...I thought it was the bike but JD at Panikswitch says that Shinto tires are "like that" and I should get the best tires I can afford.  The shintos are brand new.  I plan on riding them as far as Texas and will replace them there.  At least thats the plan.  JD says Michelin commanders but I just can't swing those prices.  I hate to even ask this but are there "good" inexpensive tires?
I plan on leaving at the end of October or beginning November. 
I will keep you all posted.
Again your help is invaluable and I really appreciate it.
Geoffrey

Offline Jim

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2017, 12:20:04 pm »
Brakes:  I tried the EBC organic on the rear and personally I will not do that again.  Organics on the rear provide minimal braking power right up to the point it locked the rear wheel.  I switched to the EBC semi-sintered and have been very pleased with them.  Not overly sensitive and they have a linear feel right to the point of locking the rear wheel.  I use EBC organics on the front.  These require higher lever pressure but will perform linearly to the point of locking the front wheel.  Disadvantage is they will fade if used aggressively although I've never reached that point, personally.  Also, since the organics in the front require more pressure, you will have move lever travel.  If you have thick grips, aftermarket levers, or have your brake lever adjusted so it's closer to the bar, this could be an issue.  Search e-bay for deals on EBC brakes.  A few months ago, I picked up 2 sets of organic FA129 for $25 TOTAL with free shipping.

What Shinko tires are you currently running?  How many miles do they have on them?  I have never had a problem with the 777 at any speed.  What is the wobble your talking about?  Maybe I'm just getting old and cynical, but bike shops are in the "business" to make "money".  Being nice and helpful is how they get return customers so they can stay in "business" and make "money".
« Last Edit: August 29, 2017, 01:03:59 pm by Jim »

Offline Jerdurr

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2017, 12:20:42 pm »
To all of you who have graciously responded:
Thank you.  So far I have fixed my barn up (much needed) put in a workbench organized tools.  I have replaced the front wheel bearings but decided to take the front forks to a pro...Panickswitch cycles in Brewer Maine.  Great place.  Next is to replace the brake pads...new question scintered versus organic (organics are cheaper and I am on a strict budget).  I'm saving up for good tires. 
Once the front end is complete I'm going back aft to do the rear bearings and brake pads.  Then it will be replacing fluids as you have all mentioned and the guys at panic switch recommended as well.  The bike came with Shinto tires which wobble at certain speeds...I thought it was the bike but JD at Panikswitch says that Shinto tires are "like that" and I should get the best tires I can afford.  The shintos are brand new.  I plan on riding them as far as Texas and will replace them there.  At least thats the plan.  JD says Michelin commanders but I just can't swing those prices.  I hate to even ask this but are there "good" inexpensive tires?
I plan on leaving at the end of October or beginning November. 
I will keep you all posted.
Again your help is invaluable and I really appreciate it.
Geoffrey
Geoffrey, just my $0.02; do not save $ on tires, IMHO a really bad idea. High speed wobbles are no fun, and may end up with the wrong side of the bike in contact with the pavement. As mentioned, just my $0.02.

Be safe, keep us posted and take awesome pics!
Best,

JD

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Offline Warwgn

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Re: Preparation for Guatemala
« Reply #17 on: August 29, 2017, 12:23:12 pm »
The Dunlop E4 in Goldwing size is about $165 shipped, I have a little over 15K miles on mine and it has been great and think it might go another 15??

The E4 for the back is $152 in stock size and was great also but only will last about 12K miles. Not sure what you consider cheap, but dollar per mile of use and how they ride I think the price for the front E4 is a great deal, the back I would say is a fair price but I went another route.