Author Topic: Sticky Locks  (Read 335 times)

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Offline Shawn

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Sticky Locks
« on: May 27, 2018, 01:05:49 am »
What do you guys/gals use for 'sticky' locks, particularly gas cap.  I'm assuming that's moisture that does that.  I don't want to gum the mechs. up with the wrong lube.  Thanks a bunch!
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Offline works4me

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Re: Sticky Locks
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2018, 01:39:56 am »
I lube mine with Marvel Mystery Oil.
I was reluctant to to use any lubricant
that wouldn’t mix easily with gasoline
or leave residuals in the fuel system.
Seems to work ok.

Offline Rick

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Re: Sticky Locks
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2018, 03:46:42 am »
First.  Don't use WD40.  It is not good for locks.  Use a light spray oil.  Triflow works fine.

Offline Shawn

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Re: Sticky Locks
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2018, 02:15:23 pm »
Thanks guys, good advice.  I knew not to use WD40.
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Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Sticky Locks
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2018, 05:47:20 pm »
Thanks guys, good advice.  I knew not to use WD40.

Well, everyone has a choice, and a special "lube", so I say use whatever you have handy ONCE, and then "fix" the mechanism..

Lubing the external locks with anything isn't really the "fixall cure", the lube itself never really makes it down below the lock tumbler, to the interface with the spring loaded locking bars below and inside... its the cleaning, and greasing of the locking bars on the bottom side that makes them function consistantly.. they become corroded and sticky from accumulated moisture in the tank, forced up thru the venting and make the bar actuation extremely difficult as the "drive pin" on the lock tumbler part is a small "bump", and offers very little leverage to actuate the bars..  pressing down on the filler cap firmly does assist, when they start getting sticky... but in some cases of extremes, on bikes that sat for years, the only "unlocking fix" comes from removing the tank, and inverting it, while tapping on the cap with a rubber mallet... carfully, and outdoors.. some spillage may occur...just warning. This "wets" the locking bars, and springs and such enough to allow the cap to be opened.. but it still needs to be disassembled, cleaned, fixed, and lubed again. I buff the parts shiney with a scotchbrite pad, and lightly grease those internals with a lithium/white grease, which seams to last, and will not harm anything if some gets into the fuel over time.

Once you take the cap apart, you will see what I mean about "applying lubes" from the top into the lock tumbler barrel...

Also, a reminder, with the cap open, remove that single screw that holds the whole bezel and cap to the tank, over around the right hand side, in the "moat" overflow area...it will allow you to unscrew the whole assembly from the outside in future, if the locking bars freeze up again...
Another reminder, if you are gonna work on that cap assembly.... remove it from the bike... and cover the filler hole with a plastic bag held on with a rubber band... I think you know why... :rotflmao: :-[ :-[
« Last Edit: May 28, 2018, 06:17:46 pm by MAN OF BLUES »

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Offline m in sc

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Re: Sticky Locks
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2018, 12:54:20 pm »
fixed mine with a keyless fuel cap.

Offline connieklr

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Re: Sticky Locks
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2018, 07:38:53 pm »
Thanks guys, good advice.  I knew not to use WD40.

Well, everyone has a choice, and a special "lube", so I say use whatever you have handy ONCE, and then "fix" the mechanism..

Lubing the external locks with anything isn't really the "fixall cure", the lube itself never really makes it down below the lock tumbler, to the interface with the spring loaded locking bars below and inside... its the cleaning, and greasing of the locking bars on the bottom side that makes them function consistantly.. they become corroded and sticky from accumulated moisture in the tank, forced up thru the venting and make the bar actuation extremely difficult as the "drive pin" on the lock tumbler part is a small "bump", and offers very little leverage to actuate the bars..  pressing down on the filler cap firmly does assist, when they start getting sticky... but in some cases of extremes, on bikes that sat for years, the only "unlocking fix" comes from removing the tank, and inverting it, while tapping on the cap with a rubber mallet... carfully, and outdoors.. some spillage may occur...just warning. This "wets" the locking bars, and springs and such enough to allow the cap to be opened.. but it still needs to be disassembled, cleaned, fixed, and lubed again. I buff the parts shiney with a scotchbrite pad, and lightly grease those internals with a lithium/white grease, which seams to last, and will not harm anything if some gets into the fuel over time.

Once you take the cap apart, you will see what I mean about "applying lubes" from the top into the lock tumbler barrel...

Also, a reminder, with the cap open, remove that single screw that holds the whole bezel and cap to the tank, over around the right hand side, in the "moat" overflow area...it will allow you to unscrew the whole assembly from the outside in future, if the locking bars freeze up again...
Another reminder, if you are gonna work on that cap assembly.... remove it from the bike... and cover the filler hole with a plastic bag held on with a rubber band... I think you know why... :rotflmao: :-[ :-[

Ditto that. I've had to 'cess out that magic location on a couple of occasions to drill an access hole so the screw could be removed and allow the cap a**'y to come off. Yes, THAT cap was hosed and replaced with an aftermarket, but better that than replacing the entire tank.
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Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Sticky Locks
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2018, 07:40:33 pm »
fixed mine with a keyless fuel cap.

 :great:
those are a viable thing for sure,
just curious as to how they (yours) vent, i.e. a check valve? or something else?

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW

Offline MAN OF BLUES

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Re: Sticky Locks
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2018, 07:45:32 pm »
Thanks guys, good advice.  I knew not to use WD40.

Well, everyone has a choice, and a special "lube", so I say use whatever you have handy ONCE, and then "fix" the mechanism..

Lubing the external locks with anything isn't really the "fixall cure", the lube itself never really makes it down below the lock tumbler, to the interface with the spring loaded locking bars below and inside... its the cleaning, and greasing of the locking bars on the bottom side that makes them function consistantly.. they become corroded and sticky from accumulated moisture in the tank, forced up thru the venting and make the bar actuation extremely difficult as the "drive pin" on the lock tumbler part is a small "bump", and offers very little leverage to actuate the bars..  pressing down on the filler cap firmly does assist, when they start getting sticky... but in some cases of extremes, on bikes that sat for years, the only "unlocking fix" comes from removing the tank, and inverting it, while tapping on the cap with a rubber mallet... carfully, and outdoors.. some spillage may occur...just warning. This "wets" the locking bars, and springs and such enough to allow the cap to be opened.. but it still needs to be disassembled, cleaned, fixed, and lubed again. I buff the parts shiney with a scotchbrite pad, and lightly grease those internals with a lithium/white grease, which seams to last, and will not harm anything if some gets into the fuel over time.

Once you take the cap apart, you will see what I mean about "applying lubes" from the top into the lock tumbler barrel...

Also, a reminder, with the cap open, remove that single screw that holds the whole bezel and cap to the tank, over around the right hand side, in the "moat" overflow area...it will allow you to unscrew the whole assembly from the outside in future, if the locking bars freeze up again...
Another reminder, if you are gonna work on that cap assembly.... remove it from the bike... and cover the filler hole with a plastic bag held on with a rubber band... I think you know why... :rotflmao: :-[ :-[

Ditto that. I've had to 'cess out that magic location on a couple of occasions to drill an access hole so the screw could be removed and allow the cap a**'y to come off. Yes, THAT cap was hosed and replaced with an aftermarket, but better that than replacing the entire tank.

perfect timing... you must have felt your ears burning, as I was frantically looking for the pictures you took of the cap/bezel/valve assembly that I l gave you to rip apart over a decade ago...

can you post those up here, so folks can see what I meant about the tumbler recess, and latching stuff...???
Pleeeeeeeze.... :great: :great: :great: :beerchug:

30 YEARS OF KAW.....Rich R. (the other one..)  COG 5977  JUSTAMEMBAHNOW