Author Topic: Keeping your hearing  (Read 3627 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ranger

  • Tricycle
  • Posts: 20
  • AREA: Northwest Area
  • COG#: 9524
  • Membership Level: Active
Keeping your hearing
« on: July 13, 2011, 10:51:11 pm »
After doing quite a lot of research on the subject I have found that wind noise for motorcycle riders is actually a very serious issue. A lot of us ride with fairings that keep the wind from blowing us off our bikes making it much more comfortable for long distance cruising. You may also think that your fairing is helping to protect your ears from wind noise damage. Not so. Not unless your fairing is one of the huge kind that sticks up way over your head and you are looking through the windshield. If you are like most of us, your fairing keeps most of the wind blast off your body but still allows you to see over the top of the fairing. If you are in this camp then you are still dealing with the buffeting wind noise. Especially if you are in dirty air. Sound familiar?? Actually, a completely naked bike is easier on your ears than most faired bikes (unless your have the monster fairing). It's that buffeting noise that causes havoc on your ears. I have tinitus in my ears, (constant ringing) and believe me, you do not want tinitus. I have to use a nature sound machine at night to help me go to sleep. 

 Which brings me to.......  I have recently road tested two noise reduction products that attach to your helmet (in addition to ear plugs). One product is called "Quiet Rider" helmet closure, and the other is called the "Windjammer".  http://www.webbikeworld.com/r2/windjammer/helmet-wind-blocker.htm  Both products are neoprene type material that fit over the head opening of your helmet to help reduce wind noise from entering base of helmet. I much prefer the "Windjammer" over the "Quiet Rider". The Quiet Rider is a real pain to install on some of the newer helmets and doesn't work as well IMHO. On the other hand, the "Windjammer" is easy to fit on your helmet and really works quite well. It really takes the edge off the noise coming in under your helmet. Try this experiment. Go out on the highway and take your bad boy motorcycle up at least to 60 mph and then take your hand or hands (if you have throttle lock) and place them underneath your helmet below your ears and against your neck. If you notice a significant reduction in wind noise (I did) then this product will work for you. The thing I like about the Windjammer is that you can fit it so that the entry hole is small or large depending on your comfort and how tight a fit you desire around the neck. It has a semi adhesive border that fits completely around the base of your helmet and doesn't slip. The higher up you fit it on the helmet, the larger the hole, and vice versa. As you can see by the below pics, I fit mine so that the entry hole is on the small side giving me maximum noise protection. It is very easy to remove at any time and reinstall later.

The down side? It's a little harder to get the helmet on, but now that I have used it a number of time I am quite used to it. Also you of course don't get as much ventilation as before making it a little bit warmer and stuffy than before especially when stopped. No problem when on the move. Lastly, you simply don't hear the engine as well as before. This thing really works. All those negatives are a good trade for me if it reduces the chance that my tinitus will get any worse. Tinitus is a real game changer. I will give up motorcycling completely if I think the noise is damaging. I hope this has been of some benefit to others out there who are concerned about their hearing.

I have absolutely no official interest in any of these products. Just someone who likes sharing news of a worthy product.  :-*


Offline Bergmen

  • Sport Tourer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2390
  • AREA: Southwest Area
  • COG#: Forum
  • Membership Level: Forum Subscriber
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2011, 04:32:01 pm »
Wow, thanks for the review on these. I had been looking at something like this to reduce noise (the helmets are not going to do it well enough for me). Many of the "helmet noise" reviews I have read make little or no mention as to whether they are riding behind a windshield or if they are, what size and shape.

I agree, the size and shape of the windshield is everything to the noise level in full face helmets. Mine is extra ordinarily noisy and has gotten worse over time (it is ready for replacement). I find that it is much quieter with my 3/4 helmet on unless I am passing semi trucks and get the lateral road noise off of them.

I am heading down ot a large motorcycle accessory outfitter this Saturday to do a complete riding gear make over (helmet, jacket, pants, boots, gloves, etc.). I'll check to see if they stock the Windjammer and if not I will order on line.

One question: Once you position the Windjammer for the proper fit, can you remove and change it? Can it be popped on and off for riding without it at times then reinstalled?

Good post!

Dan
--2014 Yamaha FJR1300A--
--ZGRX 1200 Concours (sold)--
--SPOOFAK Inventor--

Offline Ranger

  • Tricycle
  • Posts: 20
  • AREA: Northwest Area
  • COG#: 9524
  • Membership Level: Active
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2011, 04:55:21 pm »


One question: Once you position the Windjammer for the proper fit, can you remove and change it? Can it be popped on and off for riding without it at times then reinstalled?

Good post!

Dan
Yes. It stays attached to helmet by means of some kind of semi-adhesive backing and is easily removed and re-attached. After I fitted it to my helmet I wanted to reduce the size of the hole, so I simply pealed it away from helmet and slid it down a bit thereby reducing the size of the entry hole. So far it seems to work just fine. I have no idea how long the adhesive will last if it is removed frequently. By the way, it leaves no residue on the helmet when removed. Almost like the stuff they use on "post it" notes, only on steroids.

Offline Bergmen

  • Sport Tourer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2390
  • AREA: Southwest Area
  • COG#: Forum
  • Membership Level: Forum Subscriber
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2011, 05:35:39 pm »
Very cool, thanks! I will be getting one for sure.

Dan
--2014 Yamaha FJR1300A--
--ZGRX 1200 Concours (sold)--
--SPOOFAK Inventor--

Offline 2001Concours

  • Tricycle
  • Posts: 25
  • AREA: Southwest Area
  • COG#: 5301
  • Membership Level: Expired - Expired Term
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2011, 05:34:38 pm »
Here is something to consider. I have an HJC modular and a Scorpion half helmet with leather ear and chin coverings. On both my bikes, the C-10 with megashield and my Honda VTX 1800 with aftermarket fairing, the wind noise on the half helmet is at least 50% less than the noise wearing the modular. I am quite comfortable wearing the Scorpion at 60mph without earplugs, but the idea of wearing the modular at 60mph makes my ears hurt.

Sure, I can and do wear earplugs for rides longer than 50 miles, but there is still so much wind noise behind both shields using the modular verses the open faced half helmet.
2001 Kawi Concours  2002 Honda VTX 1800c    Ride 105 miles a day for my work commute on SoCal freeways.    Visit my website for Concours info:  http://community.webshots.com/user/2001concours

Offline Bergmen

  • Sport Tourer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2390
  • AREA: Southwest Area
  • COG#: Forum
  • Membership Level: Forum Subscriber
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2011, 06:20:01 pm »
Here is something to consider. I have an HJC modular and a Scorpion half helmet with leather ear and chin coverings. On both my bikes, the C-10 with megashield and my Honda VTX 1800 with aftermarket fairing, the wind noise on the half helmet is at least 50% less than the noise wearing the modular. I am quite comfortable wearing the Scorpion at 60mph without earplugs, but the idea of wearing the modular at 60mph makes my ears hurt.

Sure, I can and do wear earplugs for rides longer than 50 miles, but there is still so much wind noise behind both shields using the modular verses the open faced half helmet.

I found the exact same thing. Pretty quiet with my 3/4 open face, noisy as heck with my full face HJC CL-14. That is until I got my Shoei RF-1100 which is superb in the noise category with the top vents closed. The noise level is about the same as the HJC with the vents open.

My homemade shield is cut just right for protection and staying out of my line of sight but the size and shape of it is the reason I get all this "flag flapping in a hurricane" type noise at the helmet. Good ear plugs and keeping the vents closed and all is good.

Dan
--2014 Yamaha FJR1300A--
--ZGRX 1200 Concours (sold)--
--SPOOFAK Inventor--

Offline Joe - RI

  • Bicycle
  • *
  • Posts: 90
  • Silver is quicker
  • AREA: Northeast Area
  • COG#: 9736
  • Membership Level: Active
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2011, 06:42:18 pm »
Ranger have you encountered fogging of the shield with this on? I would think that with less air inside the helmet the shield would fog up tremendously. Currious.!!!
By the way thanks for the review nice to know that these things do exist.
COG# 9736
CDA# 0363 (2)

2011 C14 Silver&Black baby
1991 HD Sportster

Offline Steve_Cramer_GA

  • Bicycle
  • *
  • Posts: 82
    • savvypaddler.com
  • AREA: Southeast Area
  • COG#: 8200
  • Membership Level: Expired - Expired Term
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2011, 07:26:11 pm »
I got one of these for cold weather riding and found the sound reduction a pleasing side effect. Can't use it in the summer down here, though.

Steve
2000 C10, 2000 ZRX1100, CDA0297

Offline Ranger

  • Tricycle
  • Posts: 20
  • AREA: Northwest Area
  • COG#: 9524
  • Membership Level: Active
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2011, 08:15:13 pm »
Ranger have you encountered fogging of the shield with this on? I would think that with less air inside the helmet the shield would fog up tremendously. Currious.!!!
By the way thanks for the review nice to know that these things do exist.

It does fog a bit more than before, however in my case it is worth it. As long as I am moving the fogging isn't bad. I use a very cut down windscreen. I am sure in the winter the fogging issue will be there, but you will be warmer too. It's all a trade off. All in all, my ears like it on the longer rides.

Offline stevewfl

  • Iron Butt
  • *****
  • Posts: 4155
  • COG# 9334
  • AREA: Southeast Area
  • COG#: 9334
  • Membership Level: Active
Re: Keeping your hearing
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2011, 06:00:24 am »
I got one of these for cold weather riding and found the sound reduction a pleasing side effect. Can't use it in the summer down here, though.

Steve

+1

deadly in hot weather! 
KiPass!