Author Topic: The education of the rider  (Read 3734 times)

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Offline 2linby

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The education of the rider
« on: August 26, 2008, 01:35:00 am »
How did you originally learn to ride a motorcycle?  
« Last Edit: August 26, 2008, 01:36:00 am by 2linby »
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Offline Greg Habel

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The education of the rider
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2008, 07:43:00 am »
BRC or an official training program is the only way to go (IMHO).  Their bikes, certified instructors who can handle numerous situations.  Greg H from Mass, Connie Droppers Anonymous Awards Dude  COG# 7010,a Tracey  CDA 120  99 Connie "Herrin Christabelle", 05 Ninja 250  
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Offline Yuma

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The education of the rider
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2008, 10:11:00 am »
I'll agree that a professional training course is the best way to go but.  When I started riding in the late 70's they were few and far between if they existed.  So I took my brand new Yamaha XS-250 (with a full face helmet) out to a local canyon road and drove up and down for the next few hours. I learned and I am still learning. Every day there is something new to learn.  I have taken the ERC riding test. (There was a little coaching but no "teaching").     Yuma,  Summer in Yuma is not hell, but hell is a local call :-)  2006 Connie http://community.webshots.com/user/Lateck?vhost=community
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Offline S Smith

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The education of the rider
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2008, 10:30:00 am »
 
Quote
 I have taken the ERC... (There was a little coaching but no "teaching").  
   Isn't this exactly how it should be for experienced riders?  Coach and correct bad habits, refine and practice basic riding skills.     Been riding bikes since I hit the dirt in the mid 70's.  It was not until 10 years ago that I participated in a rider education course. Wish I took one earlier. I learned some basic techniques that  improved my riding immensely.      --  Steve Smith, #3184  COG Northeast Area Director  (somewhere in south central CT)    If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much space.  
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Offline Brett0769

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The education of the rider
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2008, 11:31:00 am »
The best thing about my BRC was that it was a blast. I had a lot of fun at the BRC and I learned a few very important things. Even if you're self taught, you should take the class. You'll learn something guaranteed and you'll have a lot of fun putting around on 250's on a parking lot driving range. Plus you get a nifty patch, that alone's worth 120 bucks isn't it? :) Well, the insurance reduction is anyway.    I didn't start riding street bikes until last year and I'm glad I've waited this long to do it. I've put 12,000 miles on my Connie since I got her, which was three days after I got my license, which was 2 days after I got my BRC certificate. I don't see myself slowing down anytime soon. I love it and you guys are part of that select group that know exactly what I mean when I say that.     The course gave me the basics I needed to operate the motorcycle but what it can't give you, I already had. 20+ years of experience on the roads. That experience is more important than understanding the physics and controls of the motorcycle. It's knowing the many crazy and stupid things that people will do. Then you have to filter that through the no-win lens of an impact on a motorcycle. The motorcycle gives you great tools for avoiding an accident, it's quick and agile, you have a clear view of what's around you, you're seated higher than cars, equal with trucks and you can stop on a dime. The key is avoiding the impact, because when you lose control and collide with another vehicle you're going to get hurt. Less perhaps when you're wearing the proper gear, but you are going to get hurt barring miraculous luck.     So you have to go that extra mile to avoid the collision, you have to keep aware at all times of what's going on around you, what's coming down the road and what other vehicles JUST MIGHT do. You've got to dodge the blind spots, watch the road surface and avoid the dirty air (well you don't have to, but it's as good a justification as any for zipping around a line of cars and a big truck). The BRC will teach you a system for keeping aware of your surroundings, among other things. Not important to those who've already learned through personal experience maybe, but there are tips and tricks still to be had.      I've grown comfortable with my beloved Concours, I no longer have to think through the steps of what I'm doing. I can swerve and hard brake through reflex and that was only achieved by riding her. No class can give you that reflex but they can teach you the proper form that you should always employ so that your reflex is correct. That's where coaching comes in, helping you to refine your form by seeing and recognizing what you cannot due to your perspective, then showing it to you and correcting it. Experience with any vehicle though, can only be obtained by you accumulating the miles. Dang it.     So for your own safety, I implore each and every one of you, ride as much as possible.    
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Offline smithr1

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The education of the rider
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2008, 02:38:00 pm »
I agree with everyone, take the class if it is there.  I was slow building edu through a few B&S scooters and a few dirt bikes up to about 125cc all in the 70s.  I still remember that first high speed corner on a bike over 600cc.  That is something the classes does not teach you because it is all <25mph.  Scary when I did not lean hard enough and the guard rail is getting closer and closer.  ----------------------------------  I will answer any question.  It is up to you to figure out if I should have.    <p align="left">My Photos<br
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Offline krumgrinder

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The education of the rider
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2008, 09:57:00 am »
Seat of the pants for me, as there were no 'rider training courses in the 70's, at least not where I grew up.  But, having said that, and having taken both the BRC, ERC and Stayin'Safe mini course, I heartily recommend to everyone that asks me about riding that they get training, period.  Plus, it certainly helps to have a refresher course from time to time, and just continues to bolster confidence and ability! :)  Steve K.  '02 Concours  COG# 6550  AMA# 965469  'No matter where you go, there you are...'
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Offline Ulric_Dahlgren_MD

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The education of the rider
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2008, 11:22:00 am »
I started out "seat of the pants" at 12 with a bicycle and a 7 and a half mile paper route, graduated to a Cushman motor scooter at 14, then a Lambretta at 15, then a series of small, weird motos, like Zundapps, small Ducatis, and Ariel 500's. While in the Marines I bought a 67 Honda 305 Scrambler brand new, rode it all over California, on dirt and on the roads. After a bad collision, sold it in 1971, but bought a 94 Honda Magna about 5 years ago.  The first time around I don't think they had courses or "M" license endorsements, at least I don't remember having any. But when I bought the Magna, I took the Harley riders edge course, which was a good thing and also helped on insurance rates. PS - living through an accident teaches you to "own" your misteaks!  
Ric Dahlgren  Annapolis, MD 21401  COG #7996  1994 Honda Magna  2008 C-14

Offline John

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The education of the rider
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2008, 01:41:00 am »
Started out 'seat of the pant' on a bicycle at age 8.  Numerous bikes later and at age 15, I got the taste of Vespa and Bella scooters, that did it, I was hooked.  At age 16 I had a short term with a BSA 650, that is until dad found out what I had hid in the back of the garage.  Then there was a long dry spell, it was 69 before I owned again and it was another BSA 650 that I rebuilt from a basket case.  Next was a 71 CB750 which I put a good number of miles on.  That was followed by more 750's and other dirt bikes, then a CB900 Custom.  Then I woke up and found the connie about 12 years ago.  Had one around since and doubt ever being without one.  Course I have other bikes around, but they change every now and then.    As for instruction, yes I have had the ERC and still read articles on mc riding skills.  Oh, I forgot, I had a short spell in which I did trials in those early days.  Still enjoy a trials bike, it is a completely different activity that will improve your riding skills.  If you have an opportunity to try it, definitely do.    tcars  John  
« Last Edit: August 31, 2008, 01:42:00 am by John »
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Offline Camper Dave

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The education of the rider
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2008, 05:25:00 pm »
I learned to ride a motorcycle where it was supposed to be learned, in the dirt! Nothing teaches you how to ride better than a few spills in a sand pit. And for the record, I use to wear a helmet back then  ;p but not one of those sissy full face things  :eg:  Dave Muir  1980 LTD1000 - Rocket  1999 Concours - Rocket II  1997 Dyna - wife's  CT-COG #3649 Merchandise Czar
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Offline ZGirl

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The education of the rider
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2008, 11:55:00 am »
My future hubby taught me to ride.   :)    I don't think they had BRC's at that time.  If they did, we were not aware of them.    That said; when we learned that MSF courses were available we signed up for the ERC and loved it!    I recommend the BRC to everyone that expresses interest in riding or is new to riding.  What a great resource!  
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Offline davedz

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The education of the rider
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2008, 09:28:00 am »
Seat of the pants for me when I was in college.  It wasn't back in the stone age, but close..LOL!  A friend talked me into buying a used CB360 and I rode it home, never using a clutch on a bike before.  Young and dumb for sure, as I rode on a 4-lane major street.  I've already inquired to our local ERC class last year but just missed it.  My wife just got a scooter and is scheduled for the BRC later this month.  She passed her written exam yesterday.    Now this week I'm teaching my 10 yr old on his XR70 around the yard.  He is ATTGATT prepared.  We practiced engine-off braking last night with me pushing (wheeze...puff..puff).  We'll do some stop-n-go drills tonight.  ..dz..  2003 Concours  1983 Honda Silverwing  2008 Yamaha Majesty (new)  2003 Honda XR70 (son's)
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Offline Lake Cle Elum

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The education of the rider
« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2008, 12:08:00 am »
Well - I was a slow learner! I used to write down every time I crashed on the street (racing and dirt riding didn't count) and every time I got pulled over....By age 27, I had over 25 street crashes and double the count for stops.....Although I quit writing it down, there have been a few since then......Slow learner!!!  
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Offline smithr1

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The education of the rider
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2008, 12:13:00 pm »
Dang Robert,  I always figured I would re evaluate riding as part of my life after any real crash.  That thought was when I was 16.  I am 50 now.  I am not wanting to ask that question or have my first crash.  I hope I never have to either.    Try not to picture this :)  350# guy on an older Goldwing.  He only has shorts and tennis shoes on.  He is easily the worst driver I have ever seen.  He almost had me stopping him to suggest getting some more skills before riding naked.  He actually crossed the center line on a sr8 hunk of road almost causing a head on with a car.  Cornering looked like it took all he had to do a 50mph corner at 30.  ----------------------------------  I will answer any question.  It is up to you to figure out if I should have.    <p align="left">My Photos<br
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Offline 2linby

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« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2008, 03:54:00 pm »
Try not to picture this    350# guy on an older Goldwing.  He only has shorts and tennis shoes on.  He is easily the worst driver I have ever seen.  He almost had me stopping him to suggest getting some more skills before riding naked.  He actually crossed the center line on a sr8 hunk of road almost causing a head on with a car.  Cornering looked like it took all he had to do a 50mph corner at 30.    Yeah it can be scary for sure!  But given the chance I have no issues talking to people of this "caliber" and recommending rider education to them beore they have an incident.    AKA "2linby" That's 2-lin-by folks!  Northwest Area Director  COG #5539  AMA #927779  IBA #15034  TEAM OREGON MC Instructor    http://community.webshots.com/user/2linby  http://tinyurl.com/njas8 (IBA BunBurner Gold Trip)  http://tinyurl.com/lwelx (Alaska trip)
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Offline ridin again

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The education of the rider
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2008, 07:13:00 pm »
I picked up my first bike, a used Honda 90, in 1969.    The owner gave me 3 minutes of training and off I went   in city traffic.  I finally took the MSF Advanced in   2005 and I found I still had a lot to learn.  Class   was both useful & fun. Now I'm 59 and getting a kick   out of my C14.