Author Topic: A painful learning experience  (Read 865 times)

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Offline Bud

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A painful learning experience
« on: July 26, 2017, 10:42:07 am »
Was reading over on the GS resource website this morning and found this.  I've had some brain farts in the past, forgetting to tighten screws etc.  This poor guy screwed himself horribly and it only took 5 minutes.  I feel sorry for the poor guy.

82 GS750 seized after 5 minutes with no oil.

"Spent hours working on an 82 GS750t I bought off Craigslist. It came with WAY too much oil in it, bad carbs and no exhaust. So I drained the oil, changed the filter, put some rebuilt carbs and good exhaust pipes on it and took off. It ran well, but revved instead of idling which could have been the idle screw or the mix or air leaks... I never got that far. Within 5 minutes I was headed back home to fix the idle. As I slowed down coming up to the stop sign the engine cut off and hasn't budged since.  I forgot to refill the oil. I tried pulling the spark plugs and sprayed pb blaster in there which alot of people recommended (but I think more for engines that were sitting) and that didn't help. Even after it was all cooled off it won't budge.  Anyone have suggestions or did I totally ruin my new bike on the first day?
Thanks"

One guy responded that he puts a sticky on the ignition switch that says oil when he has drained the oil and needs some help remembering to refill it.  Too bad the original poster hadn't seen that tip before.  Think I'm going to start doing that.

Offline fred-houston

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2017, 10:59:15 am »
I had a friend do the same thing, except on a brand new motorcycle.  When I change oil, I always, with no exception, right after I put the plug back in I immediately put in the oil. 
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Offline Bud

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2017, 11:10:42 am »
I had a friend do the same thing, except on a brand new motorcycle.  When I change oil, I always, with no exception, right after I put the plug back in I immediately put in the oil.

That would hurt!

Offline fred-houston

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2017, 11:13:56 am »
I had a friend do the same thing, except on a brand new motorcycle.  When I change oil, I always, with no exception, right after I put the plug back in I immediately put in the oil.

That would hurt!

He actually go a little lucky.
 
When his oil light came on, he immediately shut it down.  If I remember correctly all that needed to be done was on the top end, but it was still a $2000 repair bill. 

I guess it all got fixed, because he probably has put 60 or 70 thousand miles on it since then.
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Offline Bud

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2017, 11:17:43 am »
What kind of bike was it?

Offline fred-houston

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2017, 11:58:58 am »
Honda NT700V 

What kind of bike was it?
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Offline ConcoursKZ

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2017, 12:59:01 pm »
I am betting that GS750 needed a rebuild anyway. It had no exhaust and too much oil. Bikes might run for a while after a very long sit but almost always blow oil, foul plugs,leak from gaskets,and within 5K or so will have serious issues. Especially on a bike that is 35 years old. Better off fixing it first before it becomes a grenade.
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Offline SATXRIDER

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2017, 04:53:16 pm »
While not as bad as forgetting to add the oil, I have forgotten to put the screw cap back on and ended up with splattered oil everywhere when I started the engine to cycle it.  So I always put cap on immediately after filling.
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Offline Diz

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2017, 09:16:02 am »
I had a friend do the same thing, except on a brand new motorcycle.  When I change oil, I always, with no exception, right after I put the plug back in I immediately put in the oil. 

I make this my routine as well. Filter goes on before plug is threaded back in

Offline ron203

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2017, 11:33:20 am »
I had a friend do the same thing, except on a brand new motorcycle.  When I change oil, I always, with no exception, right after I put the plug back in I immediately put in the oil. 

I make this my routine as well. Filter goes on before plug is threaded back in

Ditto.
1) filter 2) plug 3) oil 4) start/run/check level

Once, long ago, I took my truck to get the oil changed ( I do it myself ever since I saw what I'm relating) and when I came back to get it, an old guy was ranting at the counter. I stepped back and listened. He had dropped his truck off, too and the goobers forgot to put the oil and plug back in. He drove it 1/4 mile or so and it seized. Before I left that day, I checked my oil and filter, then paranoia set it and I went home and changed it again.
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Offline Buzzard

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2017, 05:22:14 pm »
Whenever I have the oil drained from a bike, I immediately put a piece of duct tape, or a zip ty, on the throttle. I never know when the phone will ring, my wife will come running out with an emergency for me to attend to, or whatever other distraction is coming. In the communications industry, when dealing with power, they call it "Tag out-Lock out", to avoid injury to people and machinery.

Offline Mikenasty89

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2017, 01:24:44 pm »
In the communications industry, when dealing with power, they call it "Tag out-Lock out", to avoid injury to people and machinery.

Same thing at UPS with our giant motors for the belts that move that packages. Its just a good idea.

Offline oldsmoboat

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2017, 07:09:35 pm »
I used to have a Can Am 250 back in the 70s.  I was out riding in the woods and it just died on me.  Pushed it home and found the magneto had come loose and the bolt on the crank cut the windings.
I was pretty poor at the time and it was a year or two before I could afford the part, it was hard to find and took forever to get to the store. 
When it came in I rushed home and put it on.  I was so excited!  Fired up the bike and got about 1/4 mile from the house and the bike died.  Pushed it home and took the cover off to see if a wire had come off.  I had forgotten to tighten it down and the windings were cut again.
Sold the bike.

Offline TimR

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2017, 07:45:41 am »
Whenever I have the oil drained from a bike, I immediately put a piece of duct tape, or a zip ty, on the throttle. I never know when the phone will ring, my wife will come running out with an emergency for me to attend to, or whatever other distraction is coming. In the communications industry, when dealing with power, they call it "Tag out-Lock out", to avoid injury to people and machinery.

I do something similar to remind me the bike can't be started. It could be a sticky note stuck to the dash or several QTs. of oil on the seat. But something to remind me of a no run situation.
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Offline Deepsea

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Re: A painful learning experience
« Reply #14 on: August 28, 2017, 08:20:33 pm »
I had a young mechanic working for me that did this. There after EVERY oil change got a large sign before draining that said "NO OIL" placed across the handle bars. This one mistake cost my shop $2500.00 in parts alone much the lost labor. Fortunately the customer was understanding, especially after I ordered lifetime free service.
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