Author Topic: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels  (Read 822 times)

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Offline Mikenasty89

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Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« on: July 29, 2017, 12:46:24 pm »
Here in america we love to laugh at scooters, dunno why its a excellent way to cheaply get to work, easy to fix and cheap to buy. Plus it was the only thing my wife would allow (at first, could easly argue now the scooter is more dangerous in some aspects) but how many of you hardcore hog riders have, had or rode a scooter. My 2013 125cc sym cali classic has over 10k miles on it, still goes strong. Can go two up on it and still reach 55 on a flat straightaway or 45 on a hill. Plus on a busy week i pay 6 bucks a week on gas (3 bucks a tank roughly 90 miles to the gallon) less money if i treat it like a scooter and ill get the full 100mpg. I plan on keeping that scooter, cant beat how easy it is to ride the 1 mile commute at 2am every morning, just twist n go. I live in a coastal city that has mountains and foothills 20 mins away so scooters r semi big here (mostly tourists) and there are some amazing routes to take in the foothills . Plus parking is free with a scooter here, can hook em up at bike racks and nobody gives u a second look. So tell us about that redheaded step child you leave in a locked closet under the stairs called scooter and why you still have or got rid of. Just dont let your friends catch you on it ;)

Offline sininja

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2017, 03:54:10 pm »
I have a Zuma I ride all the time...  ain't no shame here  :motonoises:

Offline Bud

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2017, 10:22:45 am »
Last year an older lady I know asked me to sell her late husbands Silverwing scooter.  I had never ridden one of the big scooters before and had no idea what it would be like.  I have to say that I was pretty impressed with the performance and handling of Honda's maxi-scoot.  From a stop it would accelerate quite well.  Handling was pretty good as well.  It was a bit of an adjustment having my feet out in front of me as well as no clutch or gear shifting.  The buyer ended up being a friend of Indiana's own basketball star Larry Byrd.

Offline Mikenasty89

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2017, 11:15:41 am »
Ha thats a cool, yeah i can appeciate the simple, well built scooters there putting out today. My sym cali classis is a 2013 with over 18k miles but i havent had to replace anything except fluid/oil. I live in a area where the beach and moutains are a 20 min drive so i take that scooter into some hairpin turns, with a passanger going uphill no problem. For such a small engine its got a lot of power to carry over 350lbs of people and equipment up the steep grades i sometimes go and thats just a Chinese scoot. The Japanese have it down to a art and if i couldn't get another sym and found a honda or Yamaha id be all over it.

Offline Mcfly

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2017, 11:19:02 am »
We have a Tomos Moped.  Wifey rides it to work during the cooler months.  Crazy reliable...
So far I only replaced tires and clutch pads....  Nuttin' to be ashamed of there.

I wanna put the big bore kit on it, but I'm getting flack.  That's over 40 mph with a tail wind!
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Offline Mikenasty89

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2017, 01:31:13 pm »
Haha i thought about it too, but you upgrade ur bore, u need a bigger carb, then better breaks and ur clutch fails and needs a new one. It just seems like if you want a faster ride just get a bigger bike, its cheaper in the long run. God forbid ebay even sells turbos for scooters on it. Doubt it does anything ha. But if you have the time, money and sentimental value i can see doing it.

Offline Mcfly

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2017, 03:50:25 pm »
Haha i thought about it too, but you upgrade ur bore, u need a bigger carb, then better breaks and ur clutch fails and needs a new one. It just seems like if you want a faster ride just get a bigger bike, its cheaper in the long run. God forbid ebay even sells turbos for scooters on it. Doubt it does anything ha. But if you have the time, money and sentimental value i can see doing it.

It's all sold as a kit, for far less than another bike.... then there's the 'tinkering factor' !!
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Offline Mikenasty89

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2017, 01:02:58 am »
Mmmm guess that depends on your definition of cheaper. Without going into too much detail i have a hammer, screw driver and $20 socket set right now. Tools my kingdom for tools! And while yes that $20 ratchet works.....but not well or for long. Fortunately Chinese scooters dont like to be too tightened too much so not too much stress on it. But when it comes to anything serious i like to buy american steel and Asian powertools (sometimes)

Offline Sparkie

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2017, 03:49:57 pm »
  My wife bought a Yamaha Vino 125 a while back and she commutes on it sometimes.  When she's not riding it I'll borrow it for my 4 mi ride to work.  Hey whats not to love, 70-80 mpg and easy to park on a crowded college campus.
  I have no problem with riding different bikes for different purposes.  A scooter has its place just like the big sport touring bikes have their niche too.  I have a feeling we'll be seeing more scooters in this country with the younger generation trying to get out on their own these days. Not that easy with the price of things nowadays.  Mark
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Offline ManWorkingHere

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2017, 05:43:49 pm »
Hello,

I had a 1988 Yamaha RAZZ scooter in my garage behind some boxes.  I should not ride (yet) on my C-10 until my rotator cuff repair is stronger.  So I have dragged out the Razz to get it back in running shape.

It had run for my older daughter for two years while she was attending UW-Madison.  Many students rode scooters and there was a good shop there in town.  Seven years later, I have the scooter sitting around in my garage.

I obtained the scooter from my sister-in-law who used it at UW-Madison in the 90's when she was a student.  I got the scooter for free labor helping them build their farm house addition.  The scooter plastics had cracked a bit when my younger daughter crashed at the farm going down a hill road.  The tractor could not turn away fast enough in front of her so she took the ditch.

All these years later, I replaced what plastics I could not fix with PlastiFix for tabs and panel pieces.  My biggest challenge now is finding a matching Rustoleum color I can get in a rattle can.  Original 'Coral Blue' is no longer being made by anybody.  I checked with DupliColor and ColorFast too.

Taping up the original decals before priming and painting is next.
----

Getting the engine to run again meant learning how to take apart a carbeuretor for the first time.   The carb would run on starting fluid sprayed in the chamber but no gas came from the fuel supply.  The 'fuelcock' has no 'pet' to it because it is a vacuum-assisted gauge.  I replaced the fuelcock with an Amazon Prime purchase that arrived in no time.

Sure, it's a single-barrel carb but, hey, if you have never taken one fully apart, it was a nice puzzle.   I have watched quite a few YouTube videos to help my service education.  My own carbs went to Steve in Florida the first year I had the C-10 and I have not chosen to do any work on them since.

I do have a Yamaha service manual downloaded for free off the Internet.  And even though it is a genuine Yamaha manual, their directions are not the same as Clymer's or Chilton's books I have used on my C-10 or my Toyota Corolla respectively.
Their directions in the Service manual say: 'Remove float'.  Does not advise you to check for the float pin from the hinge area before dropping it under your workbench. Oops!

I was able to take the carb apart and clean it well.  I bought a replacement float pin from Partzilla.com that cost less than shipping it.  With the pin back in place in the hinge I was able to fire it up and get it to run on gasoline.  Wow!  It works with no pieces left over.
----

Back to working on the body parts meant I only had to buy two rubber grommet mounts and an air filter element.  I do have to fix one of the air box mounts to the transmission case using JB-Weld epoxy.  Getting the air filter case aligned will probably work best when setting the epoxy (I hope)
---

I did not find too many good boards like this one for scooter owners.  This one does have activity:
http://www.provoscooter.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=7
---

Finally, I read the other posters saying 'I can get around two-up, and still hit 50 mph, and taking hairpin turns is tight too'.  This little 49cc engine can make 30mph with a tailbreeze and a six degree downslope. Maybe. But bumps and cracks are easily felt as I ride along.

Unfortunately, I saw a sticker on the leg shield that said not to exceed 175 pounds rider weight.  I am 25 pounds well past that sunset and not looking to drop that much soon.

Right now I plan to ride it around until the snow falls.

MWH
after 2012 Rally
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Offline SantaCruzRider

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2017, 11:17:02 pm »
I'd own and ride a scooter if I lived in a place that was right for it. San Francisco comes to mind: lots of narrow streets, little ability to ever exceed 25-30 mph, ability to park on a sidewalk or in an alcove off street.

I also live in a beach town and have toyed with the idea of one for getting around town, but after building a motorized mountain bike for by teen son realized and even that was more power and hassle than I really needed. With beach traffic, it's often faster to ride a bicycle than to get into the traffic stream with a motorbike.

One local downside to the scooter, they seem to be more expensive here than an old motorcycle. And they are often in worse condition. Not sure if someone is snapping them up and shipping to SF or what, but I can probably get a well running C10 for less than a used scooter.
Dan Breeden
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Offline Mikenasty89

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2017, 12:13:42 pm »
Its sadly true scooters are priced too high, i saw 30 year old scooters beat to hell going fot 800 bucks. And if its a honda then add even more. My 2013 125cc sym lance scooter was $700 my 98 connie $1150. Now Im glad i have both but if i had known that getting a motorcycle would cost the same and have 3 times or more the power when i first got that scoot i would have thrown everything into a motorcycle. But as stated above every bike has its place and job.

Offline NYbiomed

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2017, 05:24:31 pm »
Bought a 2009 Kymco People 150 scooter for my Wife's birthday gift in May, runs like a champ, only a few thousand km's on it and it was only $950. This thing will run forever, I hardly find it overly expensive and the thing gets to about 55mph- with my 200lbs on it, perhaps 60mph with her 140lbs. The People 150 has bigger tires than most scoots at 16", I feel it's a bit safer than the typical 10/12" wheels. She takes it to yoga from time to time, which is only about 3.5 miles away. It's fun and as a result, seems to puts people who take it for a spin in a good mood.
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Offline Mikenasty89

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2017, 09:32:14 am »
I guess its where u live. In my beach town a studio goes for about 1200/month. Everthing is a little more expensive in sb. If i drive 45 mins south into ventura/oxnard i run into more afforable stuff. Right now i cant find a 50cc scooter for less than $950 the 150cc are going for 1500, and if its beat to hell u can get 50 bucks off right away and work the price down. The few that are cheap face a lot of competition for it. But i do agree u do get put into a good mood on a scooter....works  with connie too!

Offline SamSam

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2017, 02:33:08 pm »
I picked up a 2007 Honda metro 50 for $400.  Carbs were dirty and owner had no idea of how to fix. Runs perfect but only goes 35 with a tail wind.  Great for city.  Also have a 20011 Buddy 125 which I got for $700 because of similar problems.  Fixed it and love it for what it is - a city commuter that goes 55 easy.  I am a fan of anything on two wheels! 
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Offline Grant

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Re: Scooters, the redheaded stepchild of two wheels
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2017, 10:22:48 am »
Have no idea what is was made from but saw a really cool looking bobber scooter yesterday on my way to work. Have to admit I laughed then humbled myself with the fact I was so intrigued and how cool I thought it looked LOL
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