Author Topic: Making GPS routes  (Read 16945 times)

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Offline COG-528

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #25 on: March 03, 2016, 06:52:11 pm »
I use the free version of Tyre.  I'll give the basic version of MyRoute-app a try to see how it compares.
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Offline freebird6

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #26 on: May 08, 2016, 08:42:06 pm »
learning curve is not bad. Can't figure out how to favorite waypoints and use them in subsequent routes/

Offline smithr1

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #27 on: May 25, 2016, 12:41:50 pm »
Here is something cool... There is a way to stop the alerts, U turn prompts and 90 foot rule at a given point in Basecamp.  This is useful for all points that you do not want the new Route Planner type units to keep sending you back to when you have missed passing close enough to that point.

If you have the route editor pop up open, right click on a point and pick Don't Alert on Arrival.  That may(I have not tested only read) make it where you do not have to be as accurate with the placement of those points.  At least that is the impression I got from reading about that feature.  They call it a shaping point after that I think.
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Offline WG

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #28 on: May 25, 2016, 04:44:36 pm »
I don't believe it works as you think it does.  In fact, for my zumo 660, it will still alert that you are approaching the shaping point even if you tell it not to.  The only way (that I know of) to have it not alert on my zumo is to place the shaping point in an intersection.

My current way to add shaping points is to put them in the first intersection that I will ride STRAIGHT THROUGH following a turn.  That way, my nuvi still shows the turn and the shaping point is not announced on my zumo.

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Offline Redlion61

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #29 on: September 05, 2016, 11:37:03 am »
Here's how I manage routes on my Garmin 660

1. I make my route in google maps (restricted to ten waypoints)
2. I use the GPSVisualizer site to convert the Google Maps URL to GPX format and download the file.
3. I create a folder and a list in Basecamp and import the GPX file in it.
4. I create a route from the tracks that were imported (putting the tracks in order)

The only caveat with this method is if you select town names instead of exact addresses as your waypoints in Google Maps, the route might make you do some funky back and forth inside the towns selected (whoever maps the towns' coordinates in Google Maps is using some funky data source or was smoking some bad ganja - Lincoln NH ended up making me drive in an empty location near some train tracks, then back to the route I wanted).

But, if you are using specific addresses as your waypoints, it works fairly well.

By the way, I used the Garmin GPS antenna accessory on my last trip; mounted it on the shield with the optional suction cup mount. Not sure if it actually made a difference or not; I think it's only useful if your GPS is inside a cage, quite frankly.
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Offline Rony6ble

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #30 on: October 22, 2016, 03:16:08 am »
Here's how I manage routes on my Garmin 660

1. I make my route in google maps (restricted to ten waypoints)
2. I use the GPSVisualizer site to convert the Google Maps URL to GPX format and download the file.

What I do is use Google MyMaps and this is not the same as Google Maps. If you have a Google account (like gmail), go to your Drive, add a new folder if you want your maps organized and create a new map. In the frree version you have 10 layers and 10,000 features (points, polygons, lines, etc). you can have up to 2,000 features in each layer. It is very easy to import kml/kmz or gpx files. For example I have all the National Parks Visitor Center in one kmz file that I can import in a specific layer that can be on or off. On when I need the location, create a new pin in my waypoint layer and then turn the layer off. Another nice feature is that you can import a CSV (comma separated values) file (excel spreadsheet saved as "comma delimited") into a layer and then you can save this layer as a kmz/kml file for later use. Imagine a spreadsheet with all your own POI's that can be easily converted into a kml/kmz file.
Now, to create a route just click the route button and then you will have "only" 10 waypoints and the "only" is not accurate. You can add something like the "via points" by dragging the route.
After I have all my waypoints in the same layer I can export the entire map or only a specific layer as a kmz/kml that can be imported into Basecamp. The I create the route in Basecamp, apply layover time and add via-points as needed.

The only caveat with this method is if you select town names instead of exact addresses as your waypoints in Google Maps, the route might make you do some funky back and forth inside the towns selected (whoever maps the towns' coordinates in Google Maps is using some funky data source or was smoking some bad ganja - Lincoln NH ended up making me drive in an empty location near some train tracks, then back to the route I wanted).

But, if you are using specific addresses as your waypoints, it works fairly well.

Addresses are not my favorite when creating waypoints. Maybe just to have an approximate location in the map but then I move the pin to where I really want it: entry of parking lot and this will force the routing to make a specific turn. I always use pair of coordinates in decimal degrees like 32.26607, -107.7568.
I only use City/Town names when creating an overall route to get the mileage and time from Google (generally slow speed that will allow enough time for stops) when planning for an IBA ride for example. After I'm happy with the route I look for specific gas stations or other specific destinations like the Tour of Honor sites (use street view for this to find the best location to park and get my photo).

Cheers

Edit: I forgot to mention that you can share all the Google MyMaps in different ways: send a link or to specific people. When sharing with specific people (need gmail) you can make the viewers or editors. Editors can modify the map, add, delete, etc. Very useful when creating maps with a group and everyone can simply add specific information to the map: a good place to eat, photo ops, .........
« Last Edit: October 22, 2016, 03:19:50 am by Rony6ble, Reason: Add sharing options »
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Offline Gypsy JR

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #31 on: November 02, 2016, 10:04:27 am »
I don't believe it works as you think it does.  In fact, for my zumo 660, it will still alert that you are approaching the shaping point even if you tell it not to.  The only way (that I know of) to have it not alert on my zumo is to place the shaping point in an intersection.

My current way to add shaping points is to put them in the first intersection that I will ride STRAIGHT THROUGH following a turn.  That way, my nuvi still shows the turn and the shaping point is not announced on my zumo.

It's an art!

Correct, the GPS will almost always ignore the "Do Not Alert" you placed in BaseCamp.

Sometimes my Navigator on the Harley-Davidson will honor it, sometimes not. I haven't figured out yet what its logic is in that regard.


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Offline Robby1953

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #32 on: May 12, 2017, 12:40:33 am »
Thanks for the pointers! I've found I really need to  take time in making my routes or else we're chasing waypoints. Zoom in and make sure the waypoint is on the route is great advice. Also you are absolutely correct about lots of waypoints- you have to have a lot of them to keep you on your chosen route.

We just picked up a Zumo 660 and we're looking forward to seeing how it does at the National.

Me too, anxiously awaiting it to arrive.
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Offline Slingblade

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #33 on: May 12, 2017, 11:41:20 pm »
I like to map-out my route in day long segments using www.MyRouteApp.com.  It is a very intuitive application and the basic format is free - it is developed from the same people who made Tyre.  I like to use this because I can pick what looks like the most fun and interesting roads while still getting from point A to point B.  The only downside is occasionally I get too ambitious and end-up plotting a route that is partially off-road.  :??:

On the road I use a Garmin GPS that I have waterproofed myself using silicone ( look it up on YouTube - it's easy).  IF you have a GPS unit that can handle "multiple destinations" or routes then you can download your routes from www.MyRouteApp.com into your GPS and it will follow the route you chose on the computer.

A couple of pointers.

1) when plotting the route on the application dont skimp on selecting waypoints - if you do, your GPS may end up skipping some of the twisties you selected as it has a mind of its own and will select a more direct point between waypoints. ( I have attached a sample - this is day 4 of my upcoming ride from Harrisburg,Pa to Seattle,Wa)
2) Make sure that your waypoints are dead center on the road - otherwise it will assume you missed the waypoint and start telling you to turn around and go back.

Smartphones are ok but they eat up data and many of the best places to ride dont have a signal - you never have this issue with a GPS unit because it connect to satellites. I do like to use the Compass function on my iphone though.

 PS - I HATE Basecamp - it was just too convoluted and NOT intuitive for me at all.  MyRouteApp is a breeze - you will be plotting great routes within minutes!
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 11:53:46 pm by Slingblade »
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Offline Robby1953

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Re: Making GPS routes
« Reply #34 on: May 13, 2017, 01:58:42 pm »
Tom Tom Go for smart phones doesn't require data after initial download, and doesn't require cell signal as it utilized GPS satellite communication. There is a $50 fee for five years though, it constantly updates with new maps that keep the data base current.
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