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Bias v. Radial

connie_rider

Member
Member
Either will work fine.
#1} Ask yourself; Are you a corner curver or a long range rider.
Bias Plys last longer. Handle reasonably well. Generally a harder compound. More straight line stability.
Radials handle better. (Have a quicker/lighter feel). Softer compound. More fun in the twisties. Don't last as long.

If you go with a with a 110 front tire instead of the 120 handling improves too. (120 is actually a bit too wide for the rim)
Some use a radial/bias combination with good results.

Ride safe, Ted
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
+1 on all that Ted said. I've used both. Dunlops, Avons and wing size Meztler 880's that I think had some sort of rubberized rock compound in them to last so long.:) I ended up using radials for the last 10 years.
 

lrbuck

MR
Member
In the 1st few years of my C-10 ownership, I used the Dunlop sport touring radials. Got about 8-10K out of them with plenty of cupping. When the LD bug bit, I was looking at replacing 3 sets in 12 months. I met a Dunlop rep at Bike Week, and asked him about the differences between radials and bias. Bottom line, not much, for us mere mortals. Originally, I made the switch to Gold Wing sized Dunlops. Later I switched to Avon bias tires in as close to stock sizes as possible. Avons were/are superior in all respects, better turn-in, track straight, and don't cup. At a RWTW, I led a group on Wolf Pen Gap up to the Hole in the Wall restaurant in GA. I've never been a peg scraper, but riders told me they had trouble keeping up. The Avons are plenty sticky, are great in the rain/wet, and yield about 22-25,000 miles. Just sayin.

Larry
 

Strawboss

Member
Member
I agree with Larry and the miles he got, but Ted may scold you as to suspension set-up and peg scraping, the same thig happened to me on the same roads.
 

connie_rider

Member
Member
I never scold.
(I'm among the many that go too fast, and I do enough bad things that I don't have the right to throw the first stone}.
I merely offer thoughts/comments.
ie; I try to help if I can.
If I recall, I was suggesting/commenting that peg dragging is an indication of improper suspension set up or insufficient weight transfer.

ie; At the COG Track days that we attended; We were taught to transfer weight to keep the bike more upright and assure contact on the edge of the tire, but "not" beyond the edge.
We discussed setting sag (stiffening the suspension) to keep the bike from squatting in the turns.
We also discussed setting the Damping to control the suspension.
All these things work together to reduce peg dragging and improve control.
My Elder / Mr. Buck, can explain better than I.

Ride safe, Ted
 
Last edited:

jim snyder

Member
Member
Ted and I have the same issue with tires, we wear them out in less then 3,000 miles. Those Arkansas twisties shred them pretty quick.
One bias ply tire I had good luck with on my C-10 were the Avon AM-26's. Great handling and decent mileage.
 
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