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MSF Basic RiderCourse Quiz: Test Your Knowledge

S Smith

Northeast Area Director
Member
Test yourself with this MSF quiz on the basics of motorcycling. The questions were drawn from the Basic RiderCourse classroom session and handbook. If you took an MSF course or passed the local DMV test, this should be a breeze. Try this quiz and test your knowledge. Post your score. Do you agree with all of the answers? If not, why?
Good luck!

Test Your Motorcycling Knowledge
Test Your Motorcycling Knowledge
 

2andblue

Member
Member
OK - I’ll go first. Good reminder, I watch Dan Dan the Fireman frequently in which he covers nearly all these topics on any individual session.

I also bore my wife on rides chatting about road risks while out touring or geometry of the motorcycle.. lol

649760EE-0ACB-4212-B905-7A2EFBF753B3.png
 

bobct

Member
Member
41 out of 48. Did I pass? most of the acronyms got me.
The one question I didn't agree with the answer was #15 how far ahead do you look?
I look as far as I can, of course on long straight stretches looking as far as I can (traffic, weather, road conditions, side streets) and then panning back to closer to the correct correct answer, according to the quiz, 12 seconds, try doing that around a sharp turn, you better be going <8mph, lol
 

RICHKAWI

Member
Member
42 out of 48 for me. Should have been 44/48. There were two questions that I got wrong even though I knew better. Never was any good at taking tests.
 

texas.devops

Eager Upshifter in SW Houston
Member
43 of 48. The question that bugged me the most was where is the engine cut-off. I selected the option near the starter, which is absolutely true on the street bikes I've ridden. My dirt bikes had kick starters. Apparently the "correct" answer is on the right side of the handlebar? Duh, that's near the starter button, both of which are on the right hand side of the handlebar.

Every test has a few gotchas just for fun. I got my license for bikes in the mid-80's so don't remember the acronyms. Even taking the motorcycle test (written and driving) in Germany didn't have these so it was the first time I saw them. And BTW, what's the purpose other than for new riders to try remembering how things work on a two-wheeler? LOL
 

S Smith

Northeast Area Director
Member
And BTW, what's the purpose other than for new riders to try remembering how things work on a two-wheeler? LOL

A review of MSF (and other rider ed training systems) curriculums to understand why they include engine cut-off location and use knowledge. IMHO it stems from the Hurt Report, and causation of crashes. When faced with an emergent situation where shutting down the engine is required, most self-taught riders will reach for the ignition key. This requires removal of a hand from a handgrip during an emergent time. Instinctive use of the engine cut-off should lead to a safer and more efficient engine shut down in an emergent situation.
 

texas.devops

Eager Upshifter in SW Houston
Member
That’s a very reasonable and well thought out answer, and I appreciate you sharing that.

I am still a little fuzzy on that particular question though, as why the question authors would give two options that are nearly identical. I’m not aware of a bike that has a starter switch that isn’t on the right thumb, but then again I’m not out test riding all the various makes and models either.

As far as I remember the starter and kill switch are both right thumb activated, which would make both answers correct. Or did I read the answers wrong?

Thx for the feedback sir! AB
 

S Smith

Northeast Area Director
Member
That’s a very reasonable and well thought out answer, and I appreciate you sharing that.

I am still a little fuzzy on that particular question though, as why the question authors would give two options that are nearly identical. I’m not aware of a bike that has a starter switch that isn’t on the right thumb, but then again I’m not out test riding all the various makes and models either.

As far as I remember the starter and kill switch are both right thumb activated, which would make both answers correct. Or did I read the answers wrong?

Thx for the feedback sir! AB

This is the question in question.... there is no answer option for "near the starter" as you stated, nor are any answers similar. Let me know if you are still fuzzy after reviewing this.

1649448843206.png


I just took the quiz rapid fire, and would expect no less than this after 22 years of instruction.

1649449052146.png
 

kzz1king

Member
Member
A review of MSF (and other rider ed training systems) curriculums to understand why they include engine cut-off location and use knowledge. IMHO it stems from the Hurt Report, and causation of crashes. When faced with an emergent situation where shutting down the engine is required, most self-taught riders will reach for the ignition key. This requires removal of a hand from a handgrip during an emergent time. Instinctive use of the engine cut-off should lead to a safer and more efficient engine shut down in an emergent situation.
My instinctive use of the kill has caused me one dead battery and some close calls. Walk away and remember.
 

texas.devops

Eager Upshifter in SW Houston
Member
This is the question in question.... there is no answer option for "near the starter" as you stated, nor are any answers similar. Let me know if you are still fuzzy after reviewing this.

View attachment 32135

Ah yes, that's the question & options. When I think of ignition switches I think of a starter... which I guess is not the same thing. Fair enough.

Thx for pulling it up and letting me ponder my peccadillo. :^ ) AB
 

fartymarty

Member
Member
The shift pattern question got me. I've had rotary shift pattern bikes and even though manufacturers are trying standardize the shift pattern there are still vintage bikes out there on the road that don't comply and then there are the race GP type that don't either. Specifically in my mind was my first GTR motorcycle, a Bridgestone 350 GTR that started at neutral and then was down 6 times to get to 6th gear. I thought it was a trick question, maybe it was, it tricked me. :)
 

kzz1king

Member
Member
The shift pattern question got me. I've had rotary shift pattern bikes and even though manufacturers are trying standardize the shift pattern there are still vintage bikes out there on the road that don't comply and then there are the race GP type that don't either. Specifically in my mind was my first GTR motorcycle, a Bridgestone 350 GTR that started at neutral and then was down 6 times to get to 6th gear. I thought it was a trick question, maybe it was, it tricked me. :)
That one got me too.
 

S Smith

Northeast Area Director
Member
The shift pattern question got me. I've had rotary shift pattern bikes and even though manufacturers are trying standardize the shift pattern there are still vintage bikes out there on the road that don't comply and then there are the race GP type that don't either. Specifically in my mind was my first GTR motorcycle, a Bridgestone 350 GTR that started at neutral and then was down 6 times to get to 6th gear. I thought it was a trick question, maybe it was, it tricked me. :)

Consider that this is a quiz for the material presented in a MSF Basic RiderCourse (novice riders) Students will learn on modern small displacement motorcycles.
 

ka3vme

Member
Member
47 /48 question on effects of alcohol got me. As a non-consumer of alcohol I pay little attention to such things as it in no way will ever cause a problem with my riding. I know all I need to, don't drink and ride a bike. All too often over the years, particularly from the V-twin crowd, I see alcohol consuption a primary activity at "rally" and "runs". Talking to folks involved in minor to major crashes they readily offer up "alcohol may have been a factor". Seems like, as one might say these days, "worst idea ... EVER."
 
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