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Need Some Help...

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
Hey guys,

Sorry if this is redundant, but I can't seem to find anything... maybe you could paste some links (or at least show me how to navigate to find what I need)?

My C10 rides like it has NO suspension. When I brake, I notice I feel a LOT of the road through the forks - almost like it's bouncy, but hard (if that makes sense).

Seems the suspension has no shock absorption at all. It's got 46K, but I was under the impression the previous owner maintained it well.

How do I check fork preload/rear shock preload/etc? I've never done it before.

What is that "knob" next to the schrader valve for my rear shock, and where/how should it be set?

How do I know my forks don't need to be rebuilt/new oil?

What's a fork brace do?

How do I check my head stem bearings?

What is the best tire pressure to run front & rear (I'm 250 pounds and it's just me riding).

On other forums, I've seen these great write-ups with pics and such (basically a step-by-step), but am having a heck of a time finding anything here... lol

Thanks, everyone!
 

Konehead34

Member
Member
Have u checked the c10 tech area. As a member u ha e access to the tech library. Go to the main menu, go to the tech library for the c10. Scroll down to the suspension area.
 

Cra-z1000

Member
Member
Hey guys,

Sorry if this is redundant, but I can't seem to find anything... maybe you could paste some links (or at least show me how to navigate to find what I need)?

My C10 rides like it has NO suspension. When I brake, I notice I feel a LOT of the road through the forks - almost like it's bouncy, but hard (if that makes sense).

Seems the suspension has no shock absorption at all. It's got 46K, but I was under the impression the previous owner maintained it well.

How do I check fork preload/rear shock preload/etc? I've never done it before.

What is that "knob" next to the schrader valve for my rear shock, and where/how should it be set?

How do I know my forks don't need to be rebuilt/new oil?

What's a fork brace do?

How do I check my head stem bearings?

What is the best tire pressure to run front & rear (I'm 250 pounds and it's just me riding).

On other forums, I've seen these great write-ups with pics and such (basically a step-by-step), but am having a heck of a time finding anything here... lol

Thanks, everyone!

What year is your bike ? The early models (86-94)have air forks (max pressure 7 lbs). The rear air shock holds 50 lbs max air pressure .I run mine at 35 or so with just me and a few lbs in each bag . The knob by the rear shock is to set the dampening . You will need to play with it and set it where you like . Mine is normally on the 3 setting . Use a small hand pump on the air shocks as it can blow the seals with a compressor . Sounds like there may be 0 pressure in the shocks so start there .
Tire pressure should be about 40 up front and 42 rear .
 

bpdutton

Member
Member
I'm glad to see you've decided to keep your bike and work out the issues. Based on your previous posts, you have an '06. I have an '02 with 53k miles on it and I also weigh 250lbs and it's just me riding. I keep the rear shock air pressure at 30lbs and set the rebound to 3 like Cra-z1000. I did a rebuild of my rear shock last fall using Murph's kit, and it definitely made a difference. It wasn't that hard to do - the kit has all the instructions. You should also lubricate the rear shock linkage while you are working down there - just need a grease gun.

As far as the front suspension goes, you've got to change the fork oil. Who knows what kind of saki the previous owner has in there and how long ago it was changed. If you don't have a service manual, get one. A fork oil change is not that hard to do either. When you change the oil, you should remove the front springs from the fork tubes and measure them to make sure they are still within spec. Mine were OK so I didn't replace them, but lots of people do. I can tell you changing the fluid makes a HUGE difference. Pretty sure I used 15wt fork oil. Murph's has a kit for this as well with great instructions.

I run the same tire pressures as Cra-z1000.

As far as checking the front steering head bearing, check the tech pages. Pretty sure there is a write-up there. (Winter 2006-2007 Concourier in the tech pages has a full write up on steering head bearing maintenance.) A quick easy check is supporting the front of the bike so that the front wheel is off the ground. Turn the bars left to right to make sure it's smooth. When turning left and right, the bars should need just the slightest pressure to get them to turn. They should not just fall to one side or the other. There should also be no play or clunking when lifting up and down on the bars.

Don't even consider a fork brace at this point. Get the routine maintenance done first.

Good luck.
 
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connie_rider

Member
Member
AP, The C-10 has notoriously weak front springs. At 250 lbs your probably bottoming out the front suspension during braking.
First thing you should do is, screw the front pre-load adjusters in.
(They can be screwed in approx. 1"), and (for now) I suggest you use all the adjustment.
This will raise the front of the bike.
After the adjustment, you should have less brake dive, and the bottoming out/road feel will improve.
NOTE: Front springs are needed to get the most improvement.
** There is a way to improve the springs for free, but a bit of work and suspension knowledge is required.

To check your front damping, set on the bike and bounce the front end up and down.
If you have oil, you will notice that the front rises slowly (in a controlled manner) , not just bounce back up like a pogo stick.

On the rear, (because your 250, I suggest) put 50 lbs of air pressure in the shock, and set the damping adjuster to #3.
NOTE: Do NOT use an air compressor with the regulator set on high pressure,,, as you "will" over pressure the shock.
It takes only a tiny bit of air to reach 50 lbs.
Then, bounce the rear up and down.
With 50 lbs, you should have less sag.
Like the front, the damping should let the rear rise in a controlled manner, not pogo.
As an experiment, change the damping setting from 1 to 4 and watch the rebound. You should see a difference in rebound speed.

When you've done your checks report back to us with your findings, and we can steer you to the next steps.
There are many ways to improve the C-10's ride. Many cost few $$ and are relatively EZ to do.

From your questions, I suspect your not an experienced motorcycle mechanic?
I mention this as suspension changes take a bit of knowledge to do.
ie; We need to know your abilities before we go too deep in suspension mods..

Ride safe, Ted
 

Mercer

Member
Member
Both vids are essential to begin to understand suspension basics. Ted and others will be most helpful when you've done your checks then reporting back with your findings from your bike. It is a process with an end result worthy of time spent., Good luck.
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
Have u checked the c10 tech area. As a member u ha e access to the tech library. Go to the main menu, go to the tech library for the c10. Scroll down to the suspension area.
Thanks, but that's where I was having issues. After some "thinking," I think I may have found it. I've downloaded Chalkdust 1 & 2, and I believe I found the tech pages as well. I also have a Clymer manual for the bike. I am very mechanically-minded (actually do a lot of work on cars), but motorcycles are a little nerve-wracking to me since a lot more is at stake haha.
 

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aplunkett6789

Member
Member
I'm glad to see you've decided to keep your bike and work out the issues. Based on your previous posts, you have an '06. I have an '02 with 53k miles on it and I also weigh 250lbs and it's just me riding. I keep the rear shock air pressure at 30lbs and set the rebound to 3 like Cra-z1000. I did a rebuild of my rear shock last fall using Murph's kit, and it definitely made a difference. It wasn't that hard to do - the kit has all the instructions. You should also lubricate the rear shock linkage while you are working down there - just need a grease gun.

As far as the front suspension goes, you've got to change the fork oil. Who knows what kind of saki the previous owner has in there and how long ago it was changed. If you don't have a service manual, get one. A fork oil change is not that hard to do either. When you change the oil, you should remove the front springs from the fork tubes and measure them to make sure they are still within spec. Mine were OK so I didn't replace them, but lots of people do. I can tell you changing the fluid makes a HUGE difference. Pretty sure I used 15wt fork oil. Murph's has a kit for this as well with great instructions.

I run the same tire pressures as Cra-z1000.

As far as checking the front steering head bearing, check the tech pages. Pretty sure there is a write-up there. (Winter 2006-2007 Concourier in the tech pages has a full write up on steering head bearing maintenance.) A quick easy check is supporting the front of the bike so that the front wheel is off the ground. Turn the bars left to right to make sure it's smooth. When turning left and right, the bars should need just the slightest pressure to get them to turn. They should not just fall to one side or the other. There should also be no play or clunking when lifting up and down on the bars.

Don't even consider a fork brace at this point. Get the routine maintenance done first.

Good luck.
Thanks, Brian! The jury is still out on whether or not I'm keeping the bike - I am only selling due to necessity, but I don't want to get rid of it for nothing, so I may as well keep it in the meantime and work out the kinks. I'm slowly realizing that the previous owner didn't keep up with the maintenance as well as I thought - he may have been religious with the valve adjustments & changing fluids, but other things went by the wayside. To be honest, I keep vacillating between keeping it and selling it - HATE the buzz, but love the size of the bike. In the meantime, for my safety, I wanna make sure the bike is taken care of.

On the rebound for the rear shock: what are the three settings? I notice the tab slides in and out. Which is the most rebound, and which is the least?

I will scour the tech pages and see about the forks (and I'll consult the Clymer manual I have).

Since the bike is my only mode of transportation right now, I'm hoping these are evening (or weekend) jobs... haha.
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
AP, The C-10 has notoriously weak front springs. At 250 lbs your probably bottoming out the front suspension during braking.
First thing you should do is, screw the front pre-load adjusters in.
(They can be screwed in approx. 1"), and (for now) I suggest you use all the adjustment.
This will raise the front of the bike.
After the adjustment, you should have less brake dive, and the bottoming out/road feel will improve.
NOTE: Front springs are needed to get the most improvement.
** There is a way to improve the springs for free, but a bit of work and suspension knowledge is required.

To check your front damping, set on the bike and bounce the front end up and down.
If you have oil, you will notice that the front rises slowly (in a controlled manner) , not just bounce back up like a pogo stick.

On the rear, (because your 250, I suggest) put 50 lbs of air pressure in the shock, and set the damping adjuster to #3.
NOTE: Do NOT use an air compressor with the regulator set on high pressure,,, as you "will" over pressure the shock.
It takes only a tiny bit of air to reach 50 lbs.
Then, bounce the rear up and down.
With 50 lbs, you should have less sag.
Like the front, the damping should let the rear rise in a controlled manner, not pogo.
As an experiment, change the damping setting from 1 to 4 and watch the rebound. You should see a difference in rebound speed.

When you've done your checks report back to us with your findings, and we can steer you to the next steps.
There are many ways to improve the C-10's ride. Many cost few $$ and are relatively EZ to do.

From your questions, I suspect your not an experienced motorcycle mechanic?
I mention this as suspension changes take a bit of knowledge to do.
ie; We need to know your abilities before we go too deep in suspension mods..

Ride safe, Ted
Ted, thanks for the comment.

Regarding the front springs: progressive springs are the way to go, right? I'll work on changing fork oil, measure the springs when apart, but I'm wondering if while I have it apart I just replace the springs if it really makes that much of a difference in the ride. I honestly can't stand the way this thing rides. If it soaked up the bumps, but wasn't floppy, I would be MUCH more inclined to want to keep the bike, but as it is now, I find myself saying "UGH" when I go over a pretty big bump.

I'll purchase an air pump for the rear shock.

And no, not an experienced motorcycle mechanic. I have worked on cars my entire life, and am very knowledgeable with those, have done SOME (small work) on bikes, and am very mechanically-minded, but I guess I've always had a fear of working on bikes, since so much more is at stake if something goes wrong lol. I'm ready to get over that fear, though, and save me some money (within reason).
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
Both vids are essential to begin to understand suspension basics. Ted and others will be most helpful when you've done your checks then reporting back with your findings from your bike. It is a process with an end result worthy of time spent., Good luck.
Thanks for the encouragement. I think I'll continue on with "fixing" the bike (ironing out these issues that may not be as bad as originally thought), and we'll go from there.
 

bpdutton

Member
Member
"On the rebound for the rear shock: what are the three settings? I notice the tab slides in and out. Which is the most rebound, and which is the least?"

There are actually 4 settings - pushed all the way in (1), one click out (2), two clicks out (3) and all the way out (4). Pushed all the way in gives you the least damping force which is the softest setting. That's for light loads, good roads and just tooling around. All the way out is the most damping force which is the hardest setting. This is for heavy loads, bad roads or when you are really twisting it. At 250lbs (without gear) like me, you are kind of a heavy load so you want the damping force on the stronger side. I have experimented with all 4 settings and find 3 as the best for all around riding. The softer settings allow for too much bouncing for my taste. The roads here in CT kind of suck. HTH.
 

connie_rider

Member
Member
AP, knowing that your mechanical helps.
NOTE: The Connie loves to be tinkered with.
(As an auto mechanic, you shouldn't have any problem with most of the normal maintenance items).
On the fork oil/dampening,,, is there any leaking out of the fork seals?
,,,,,,If no, you probably have oil, and it only needs changing..
I suggest you increase the pre Load rather than replace the springs first.
,,,,,It might be enough for now.

I had the Progressive Brand Springs. They felt better than the OEM springs, but the ones I had were too soft.
A free way to improve your fork springs is to remove them from the forks, and cut about 4" off of them.
Then reinstall, (using a 4" long section of 3/4" PVC pipe)..
Works great!!!!! Costs nothing!
We can talk about removing the springs {after you do the adjustment's we suggested and report your findings).

The fact that you say the bike is floppy makes me suspect your head stem bearings may need adjustment.
To check them;
Have someone set on the bike (so the front end is elevated) and then (have him) hold the front brake.
Pull forward and let off on the front wheel...
If you feel a click each time, it's probably bearings.
NOTE: You can also set on the bike, hold the front brake the exercise the suspension. If you feel a click it is probably those bearings.
But, you may also feel the springs shifting in the tubes as you compress the forks).
The bearings probably only need adjustment, not replacement.

To adjust them, remove the top triple tree, and tighten the stem nut that is under it.
(Look at the manual first to get an idea of the assembly).

To remove the upper Tripple Tree, remove the switch cover, upper fork pinch bolts, and the upper stem cap nut.
The upper tripple tree can be raised off the stem after that, and you can tighten the stem nut below the upper tripple tree.
(If needed, we can offer more advise there)

NOTE: All my procedures are from memory, so others can add details if/when I miss something.

Happy Tinkering!
Ride safe, Ted

PS: I am NOT a suspension Guru. ("Many" know a lot more than me).
But I am a Tinkerer (and Frugal), so I've discovered some tricks along the way that can help.
 
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aplunkett6789

Member
Member
@aplunkett6789 - I have a Progressive Suspension air pump you can borrow to put some air in the shock. I'll be around in/out this weekend. Let me know.
BTW - I think I saw you riding on Cherry St one evening a few weeks ago.
I'd bet 10.00 that was me - LOL. Hopefully it wasn't one of the times I was "squidding" it without pants and a jacket! :ROFLMAO: I just moved, though - long story short, my landlady turned out to be a psycho and I needed to get out of there. Currently staying in a friend's basement in Prospect while I figure out what my next move's gonna be.

Thanks for the offer, but I actually have a Fox-brand pump coming tomorrow morning from Amazon.

I do have a question, though: my little Suzuki got a nail in the front tire - know anyone who can swap the tire/balance for cheap? Local shop in Ansonia quoted me $45 if I bring wheel/tire to them.

Thanks, Steve.
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
Well, everyone:

On my lunch break I checked my tire pressures: rear was at 40 PSI, pumped it to 42; front was at 30, pumped it up to 40. Went for another quick ride, and the bike seems to ride worse. :mad: Can now feel EVERYTHING in the road, and feels harder. I also notice a "death wobble" (don't know what you call it on a bike) when I left off the throttle between 40-45 MPH.

I have a pump coming tomorrow and I'll check out the rear shock, and I'm going to try messing with the preload on the forks to see where we're at. I watched those two YouTube videos and they were very informative.
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
AP, knowing that your mechanical helps.
NOTE: The Connie loves to be tinkered with.
(As an auto mechanic, you shouldn't have any problem with most of the normal maintenance items).
On the fork oil/dampening,,, is there any leaking out of the fork seals?
,,,,,,If no, you probably have oil, and it only needs changing..
I suggest you increase the pre Load rather than replace the springs first.
,,,,,It might be enough for now.

I had the Progressive Brand Springs. They felt better than the OEM springs, but the ones I had were too soft.
A free way to improve your fork springs is to remove them from the forks, and cut about 4" off of them.
Then reinstall, (using a 4" long section of 3/4" PVC pipe)..
Works great!!!!! Costs nothing!
We can talk about removing the springs {after you do the adjustment's we suggested and report your findings).

The fact that you say the bike is floppy makes me suspect your head stem bearings may need adjustment.
To check them;
Have someone set on the bike (so the front end is elevated) and then hold the front brake.
Pull forward and let off on the front wheel...
If you feel a click each time, it's probably bearings.
NOTE: You can also set on the bike, hold the front brake the exercise the suspension. If you feel a click it is probably those bearings.
But, you may also feel the springs shifting in the tubes as you compress the forks).
The bearings probably only need adjustment, not replacement.

To adjust them, remove the top triple tree, and tighten the stem nut that is under it.
(Look at the manual first to get an idea of the assembly).

To remove the upper Triple Tree, remove the switch cover, upper fork pinch bolts, and the upper stem cap nut.
The upper triple tree can be raised off the stem after that, and you can tighten the stem nut below the upper triple tree.
(If needed, we can offer more advise there)

NOTE: All my procedures are from memory, so others can add details if/when I miss something.

Happy Tinkering!
Ride safe, Ted

PS: I am NOT a suspension Guru. ("Many" know a lot more than me).
But I am a Tinkerer (and Frugal), so I've discovered some tricks along the way that can help.
Thanks for your comment!

1. There is no oil leaking from the fork seals - they are nice and tight & in good shape.
2. When adjusting preload, do I turn: the actual nut on the bottom of the threaded rod (first pic), or the rod itself (second pic)?

Can you clarify the adjustment on the head steam bearings? From what I'm gathering, I need to have someone get on the bike... and then do I hold the front brake? Do they? I'm assuming I'm standing in front of the bike, holding the brake, and pulling the handlebars towards me, feeling if there's any movement in the stem? I just checked them on my MTB the other day and kinda did the same thing...

Sorry to be particular, just wanna make sure I'm doing this right LOL
 

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aplunkett6789

Member
Member
"On the rebound for the rear shock: what are the three settings? I notice the tab slides in and out. Which is the most rebound, and which is the least?"

There are actually 4 settings - pushed all the way in (1), one click out (2), two clicks out (3) and all the way out (4). Pushed all the way in gives you the least damping force which is the softest setting. That's for light loads, good roads and just tooling around. All the way out is the most damping force which is the hardest setting. This is for heavy loads, bad roads or when you are really twisting it. At 250lbs (without gear) like me, you are kind of a heavy load so you want the damping force on the stronger side. I have experimented with all 4 settings and find 3 as the best for all around riding. The softer settings allow for too much bouncing for my taste. The roads here in CT kind of suck. HTH.
Thanks, Brian! That does help. And yes, CT roads do suck... bad.
 

S Smith

Northeast Area Director
Member
I'd bet 10.00 that was me - LOL. Hopefully it wasn't one of the times I was "squidding" it without pants and a jacket! :ROFLMAO: I just moved, though - long story short, my landlady turned out to be a psycho and I needed to get out of there. Currently staying in a friend's basement in Prospect while I figure out what my next move's gonna be.

Thanks for the offer, but I actually have a Fox-brand pump coming tomorrow morning from Amazon.

I do have a question, though: my little Suzuki got a nail in the front tire - know anyone who can swap the tire/balance for cheap? Local shop in Ansonia quoted me $45 if I bring wheel/tire to them.

Thanks, Steve.

All I saw it was a C10. It was dark and on Cherry St... I was headed home.

The guys in Ansonia (Valley Motorsports) are usually reasonably priced. That seems like the going rate at a shop for a tire swap when you bring your own tire. There is another private shop in Wolcott I used a while ago that you may want to get a price from for comparison. (Pete's Motorcycle Parts)
Good luck
 

bpdutton

Member
Member
"When adjusting preload, do I turn: the actual nut on the bottom of the threaded rod (first pic), or the rod itself (second pic)?"

You turn the rod (adjuster) itself (second pic). Turning it in (clockwise) increases the spring preload, turning it out (counterclockwise) decreases it. One thing to make sure - there are 7 markings on each adjuster. Make sure you have both adjusters set to the same mark or you will have un-even preload. I set mine at the most preload - I turned them both all the way in and then backed them each out to the first mark. This helps some with brake dive when applying the front brake aggressively.

If you say your front end feels "hard", I'm afraid increasing tire pressure and preload is going to make it feel even harder. I still say you need to get fresh fork oil in there - and the right amount - to make sure you're getting the appropriate damping.
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
All I saw it was a C10. It was dark and on Cherry St... I was headed home.

The guys in Ansonia (Valley Motorsports) are usually reasonably priced. That seems like the going rate at a shop for a tire swap when you bring your own tire. There is another private shop in Wolcott I used a while ago that you may want to get a price from for comparison. (Pete's Motorcycle Parts)
Good luck
Thanks for all the help - have a good weekend!
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
"When adjusting preload, do I turn: the actual nut on the bottom of the threaded rod (first pic), or the rod itself (second pic)?"

You turn the rod (adjuster) itself (second pic). Turning it in (clockwise) increases the spring preload, turning it out (counterclockwise) decreases it. One thing to make sure - there are 7 markings on each adjuster. Make sure you have both adjusters set to the same mark or you will have un-even preload. I set mine at the most preload - I turned them both all the way in and then backed them each out to the first mark. This helps some with brake dive when applying the front brake aggressively.

If you say your front end feels "hard", I'm afraid increasing tire pressure and preload is going to make it feel even harder. I still say you need to get fresh fork oil in there - and the right amount - to make sure you're getting the appropriate damping.
I'm thinking that's the case, too. We'll see - gonna spend some time wrenching on it tomorrow morning after breakfast. Thanks again for the help!
 

connie_rider

Member
Member
AP, in your first note you said; ( When I brake, I notice I feel a LOT of the road through the forks - almost like it's bouncy, but hard (if that makes sense).
It sounds like your getting a lot of brake dive and describing the feel of a fully compressed front end.
If your feeling roughness "when your braking", the front end may be bottomed out, and spring pressure is what you need to adjust.
(If it helps, add a stiffer spring later).

NOTE: It's possible/probable that the fork oil has never been changed and the oil is worn out.
This can be improved, but you need to know if you have excessive brake dive first.

Like most OEM Suspensions;
A C-10 has very little compression damping.
,,,,(Compression damping slows the suspension as it compresses).
A C-10 does have rebound damping.
,,,,(Rebound damping slows the suspension as it extends) {after it is compressed}

On a stock C-10 the only damping adjustment you have (on the front) is the oil viscosity, and oil level.
If you want to do that first; you can remove the front forks from the bike and rebuild or refill them.

If you want to try an easier option first,,,, (to rule out brake dive)
Watch the video's I sent; then use that info to increase the pre load/set sag, bounce the suspension, and report.
After we get your findings, we can help you Improve your suspension.

Happy Tinkering.
Ride safe, Ted
 
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turbojoe78

Member
Member
AP, your comment on the "death wobble" at 40 - 45 mph on deceleration is a symptom of loose steering head bearings.

If memory serves me (I'm getting old) you can tighten the steering head by using a spanner wrench, or a punch and hammer.

Loosen the nut on top of the upper triple tree, loosen the 2 bolts on each side at the top of the fork tubes and then try with the spanner or the punch and hammer to tighten the slotted nut under the upper triple tree.

If you tighten it up too much you will know it by the feeling of the bike wanting to steer it self ... not good!
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
I put about 220 miles on the bike today. I don't want to admit it, but I think I'm falling in love. My last bike was a 150 HP Bandit 1200 that I sold in 2015, and with the exception of the little GS650 I picked up this May, it's been some years since I've been on two wheels. I've noticed that I'm overly cautious, afraid to really countersteer/lean in turns (which can be dangerous)... definitely not the hooligan I was in my twenties. :ROFLMAO:
Also, somewhere along the way I picked up a habit of pulling the opposing bar while countersteering.. will have to train that out of myself. But, all in all, as I become more confident again, I find myself really enjoying the Connie - enough to at least continue trying to iron out the kinks and see where things go.

On ergonomics: I have a Storz adapter and Daytona bars on the way from @bowtie39 - when I install those I'll address the sticking throttle cable(s) at that time. One of the things I don't like is the pressure on my wrists from leaning forward, and the new bars should help tone the buzz down.

I still notice the "death wobble" - I'm gonna purchase a spanner wrench and check the head stem bearings (thanks, @turbojoe78!). I also noticed when really laying the bike on its side at highway speeds, the bike feels "wobbly" - we'll see if head stem bearings fix that, too.

I got a Fox racing pump for the rear shock today. There was no air in the shock. I pumped it up to 50 PSI and put the damping switch in all the way to 1, and took it for a short ride - definitely didn't feel as bone-jarring this time around. If there was no air in there, is that an indication I need to rebuild the shock, or is it normal that they lose air over time?

The preload is set at 5 already - not sure cranking it all the way down will make the bike handle better - I think I need to do the fork oil.

Murph's is gonna love me by the time this is over.
 

2andblue

Member
Member
If there was no air in there, is that an indication I need to rebuild the shock, or is it normal that they lose air over time?
Once every few weeks we would need to add a little air / whether or not a rebuild would of helped unsure - just made it a habit and drivability / performance was never an issue.
 

Bud

Member
Member
I bought a used progressive rear shock for my 01. I took the stock C14 shock and put that on my son's 87. Both are a big improvement over a stock "ancient" C10 shock. I can also recommend straight rate fork springs. Ted's method of cutting stock springs would work as well, as long as the proper length is chosen. Ted also found some cheap cartridge emulators on ebay that will improve the ride and handling.
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
I bought a used progressive rear shock for my 01. I took the stock C14 shock and put that on my son's 87. Both are a big improvement over a stock "ancient" C10 shock. I can also recommend straight rate fork springs. Ted's method of cutting stock springs would work as well, as long as the proper length is chosen. Ted also found some cheap cartridge emulators on ebay that will improve the ride and handling.

Bud, thanks so much. Can you send me a link to a Progressive rear shock that would work for my C10? Is it a generic thing, or would it be something specific to the bike?

Also, regarding springs: I thought progressive springs were the ones with the better ride, and the straight rate ones rode stiffer….
 

Bud

Member
Member
Progressive shock on ebay

I bought mine used for $200. A properly tuned fork with the correct straight rate springs for your weight and cartridge emulators rides very nicely. Front end dive during braking is also improved.
 

bobct

Member
Member
"I still notice the "death wobble" - I'm gonna purchase a spanner wrench and check the head stem bearings (thanks, @turbojoe78!). I also noticed when really laying the bike on its side at highway speeds, the bike feels "wobbly" - we'll see if head stem bearings fix that, too."


Deceleration death wobble is probably the loose steering head. Put the bike on the centerstand and get the front tire off the ground, either by putting weight on the passenger seat or jacking a bit under the engine. (Be careful, the bike loves to roll forward off of the centerstand with the littlest of a push)
With the front wheel off the ground the steering shouldn't just fall from gravity and hit the steering stops and bounce off.
There was a test using an old time fishing scale (weight) and I think it was around 8 oz of pull on the handlebar end to make the steering go to the stops. Just think of the force of a fully loaded 1/4 lb cheesburger leaning agianst the bar end when checking/adjusting, lol. Also check for a notchy feel when moving the handlebars from stop to stop indicating bad bearings or bad bearing race(s).

The other thing to check that gives the bike instability at highway speeds (like riding on marbles) is a loose or missing (snapped off) engine mount bolt. The engine is an intergral part of the lower front of the frame.
 

aplunkett6789

Member
Member
"I still notice the "death wobble" - I'm gonna purchase a spanner wrench and check the head stem bearings (thanks, @turbojoe78!). I also noticed when really laying the bike on its side at highway speeds, the bike feels "wobbly" - we'll see if head stem bearings fix that, too."


Deceleration death wobble is probably the loose steering head. Put the bike on the centerstand and get the front tire off the ground, either by putting weight on the passenger seat or jacking a bit under the engine. (Be careful, the bike loves to roll forward off of the centerstand with the littlest of a push)
With the front wheel off the ground the steering shouldn't just fall from gravity and hit the steering stops and bounce off.
There was a test using an old time fishing scale (weight) and I think it was around 8 oz of pull on the handlebar end to make the steering go to the stops. Just think of the force of a fully loaded 1/4 lb cheesburger leaning agianst the bar end when checking/adjusting, lol. Also check for a notchy feel when moving the handlebars from stop to stop indicating bad bearings or bad bearing race(s).

The other thing to check that gives the bike instability at highway speeds (like riding on marbles) is a loose or missing (snapped off) engine mount bolt. The engine is an intergral part of the lower front of the frame.
Thank you, Bob! That's one of my goals for this week. I'll report back once I have some info.
 

tdbru

Member
Member
Aplunkett6789,
all good advice you've been given. here's one more thing to check and something to save up for. when I got my '06 i chose to do a lot of suspension work because i wasn't totally happy with the front end dive under hard braking. from what i understand the '06 was the last year of the C10 and the last of the Lincoln, Nebraska production. I.E. they were shutting down production in that facility. I bought my C10 used, so don't know what any previous owner did, but while i was checking suspension things out i found out that the bracket thing (sorry I don't have a parts diagram in front of me) that the suspension bolts go through had NO needle bearings in them. the bolt was riding on the casting. I don't know if the factory just didn't put them in (disgruntled worker, or parts shortages due to line being closed down soon) or if a previous owner took them out to "lower" things a bit. so while you're checking things, make sure all the needle bearings in the rear suspension pivots are really there. after i got that taken care of i sent the front forks off to racetech, talked to the guys and they put 1kg/mm straight rate CrSi springs in, GVEs (gold valve emulators) and their fork oil. I also picked up a WORKS PERFORMANCE rear shock assy and swapped it out with the stock one (they're no longer in business i think). I also did the 17" wheel swap. So i changed a lot of stuff, and fixed some other stuff all at the same time. the total difference was/is night and day. no more diving under hard braking( low speed compression and rebound dampening) yet little ripples in the road don't come through the bike and the tire stays stuck to the road (high speed compression and rebound dampening) . Also set the spring preload, both front and rear, like in the videos. that helped a lot too. It was a bunch of work and expense, and it took many weekends to accomplish, but the changes increased the riding enjoyment, and in my opinion bike safety, many times over and was worth it. as far as aftermarket rear shock, now that WORKS PERFORMANCE went out of business (i think the owner / founder passed away) you might google Penske shocks or just ask here if there are other good aftermarket rear shocks that are a bit more adjustable than the stock one if you want to go that route. One place that K held the line on production cost for the C10 was, in my opinion, in the suspension department. The C14 factory suspension is way better than the C10 factory suspension.

almost all my upgrades, repairs, modifications have been focused in 3 areas, rider comfort, braking, and suspension. The engine, save SISF's overflow tubes, is essentially stock.

the new C14s are sooo very tempting, but some of the checklist items that had me looking for the C10 in the first place was rider wind & weather protection, shaft drive, sportier handling than a cruiser, and range. And boy does the C10 have the range to it. once you get your C10 all setup to how you like it, you'll be quite pleased with it i think.

best to you
-tdbru
 

connie_rider

Member
Member
tdbru, what is your weight?
{if weights are about the same} The springs you selected could be perfect for aplunkett.

AP; here are the Emulators. Their a copy of the original Gold Valve Emulators that tdb used. (at a reasonable cost)

Here is old discussion on suspension mods on a C-10. (Frugal style)


NOTE: If you opt to go inside the forks and add emulators/oil, I suggest installing new fork seals, while your there.

Ride safe, Ted
 
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Tim R

Moderator
Staff member
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I still notice the "death wobble" - I'm gonna purchase a spanner wrench and check the head stem bearings (thanks, @turbojoe78!). I also noticed when really laying the bike on its side at highway speeds, the bike feels "wobbly" - we'll see if head stem bearings fix that, too.
Loose triple tree bearings can cause a high speed wobble. Don't over tighten. If occurring on Decell check the front wheel bearings.

A good way to check the tightness of the triple tree bearings is to put the bike on the center stand, put a block under the exhaust to keep the front wheel off the ground. Push and pull on the front wheel to see if there is any movement fore and aft.

Servicing the triple tree bearings are a pita and I would believe have never been serviced/greased. The 1/4-inch ball bearings have a tendency to run and hide all over the place. Seems like you can find them all except one. If you go into the triple tree that far I would suggest a set of All Balls bearings. These are caged tapered bearings that sure make steering the bike a breeze. Changing the races should be pretty straight forward for you.
 
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