• Can't post after logging to the forum for the first time... Try Again - If you can't post in the forum, sign out of both the membership site and the forum and log in again. Make sure your COG membership is active and your browser allow cookies. If you still can't post, contact the COG IT guy at IT@Concours.org.
  • IF YOU GET 404 ERROR: This may be due to using a link in a post from prior to the web migration. Content was brought over from the old forum as is, but the links may be in error. If the link contains "cog-online.org" it is an old link and will not work.

Truly Waterproof Gloves

bowman.justin77

Member
Member
Alright fellow Connie riders! I have a question, and figured this was the best place to ask. I ride my 2013 Concours in the Denver area almost daily, averaging about 15,000 miles a year commuting. Needless to say I get my fair share of weather. I can handle most of it, with the help of heated gear, and lots of layers, even seeing temps in the single digits last winter. The only issue I have is my gloves, and being truly waterproof. I have browsed several online sites,  only to find reviews for "waterproof" glvoes that say after an hour they were left with wet hands.

Does anyone know of a truly waterproof glove? If there is a preference for a winter (cold) weather and a spring glove please share!

I am currently carrying 3 pairs of gloves so I can change if I end up in the wet.
 

boomer

Crotch Rocket
Forum Subscriber
Marigolds?  :rotflmao:
Seriously, the only gloves I've ever worn that could handle all day rain and leave yer hands dry were Rukkas.
They were serious money but kept me dry.
Yer best bet is to deflect the rain before it hits yer hands.
 

ghostrider990

Member
Member
Yep.
Golden Unicorn.....waterproof gloves.

Agreed with the Aerostich Triple digits as a way of keeping water off your gloves, and from soaking in.
They're not perfect, especially in fit form function - but as far as water-proofness, they work and not many other options out there that are better.

I've had multiple pairs of Waterproof and Goretex Gloves, and the ONLY way to ensure they stay dry is have a TRULY waterproof layer OVER your protective gloves.  At least in an extended driving rain.

Most cooler weather Goretex INNER liners simply act like a "diaper" and soak in water on the outer shell, and then eventually leak through the inner.  Not to mention they get FAT and heavy as the water saturates the outer layers.

This is no different then wearing a "waterproof" jacket or pants with an inner membrane or liner.  The outer is gonna get soaked, and eventually leak past the inner layer.

Ergo:  there IS no magic bullet or BEST pair of anything that is virtually waterproof, all-day comfortable, non-bulky, and breathes well in warmer weather.  Yet.

gr
 

bobct

Member
Member
I agree the hippo hands may be your best bet. Not fashionable but the looks you must get in single digits riding they may think you are somewhat sane donning the hippo hands. If you have heated grips/gloves the should provide more warmth with the hippos. Tight weaved material sprayed with some waterproofing should keep the wet from soaking through, maybe some rubberized/neoprene material would work. There was a post about building them yourself with a pattern awhile back, maybe the old site.
 

texasdw

Bicycle
This year I decided to Sno-Seal my waterproof gloves to keep the outer layer from soaking up water. It might have worked (haven’t been in heavy rain since). But trust me, you do not want to Sno-Seal your electric gloves. Once you turn them on that stuff melts onto your clutch and brake levers, as well as the grips themselves. It gets pretty nasty. It seemed like a good idea at the time. :-[
 

ron203

Southeast Area Director
Member
I always had good luck with Tent-Dry spray on outdoor gear like tents and backpacks, so once I thought I'd do a pair of leather gloves. All good until I absentmindedly wiped a knuckle across my eye for some reason. OH MY GAWD!!!  :'(  Just don't do it.  :))
 
5

56taskforce

Guest
Guest
As expensive as something so simple as a pair of good gloves are I hate to say it but the only way is to pack multiple pairs and change them out. The biggest irritation I have with gloves is spending $100+ on a pair and the liners turn inside out every time they are removed.
I have a friend that does a lot of winter riding and  Swears by his Klim snowmobile gloves I don't know how dry they keep him but he says they take the heat from the heated grip and distribute it all the way around the hand.
 

dcstrng

Member
Member
4-5 years ago when I used to commute regularly, I never did find a truly waterproof motorcycle glove (unless you wanted to use a true rubber over-glove).  Never found a truly warm motorcycle glove either -- finally went over to the snowmobile crowd -- rode with a treated leather gauntlet snowmobile glove for below freezing riding and with occasional retreating of the leather that seemed to work (my bike at the time didn't have an alternator strong enough to run all the `lectric-lingerie that contemporary bikes seem able to support).  I had tried a pair of pricey Gortex-Thinsulate gloves, but they were a disappointment -- bled too much cold air at riding speeds.  If I ever went back to genuine cold weather riding, I'd dig out my snowmobile gloves --
 

Daboo

Moderator
Staff member
Member
I've used "hippo hands" or handlebar muffs.  They are nice.  The hands will stay dry and warm if you can block air from coming in the glove.  One tip...buy snowmobile handlebar muffs.  The name doesn't say "motorcycle" and it'll be half the price.

I have the aerostitch triple-digit gloves now for cold weather.  My current gloves stay waterproof long enough for any riding I do.  For non-heated gloves, I use either Olympia Cold Throttle gloves or Cortech gloves.  I have both the Cortech Scarab gloves and Cortech Hydro GT gloves.  The Olympia Cold Throttle and Cortech Scarab gloves have 100g of Thinsulate insulation.  It's enough to work with my hands to 50F.  Below that, I'd want some glove liners.  The Cortech Hydro GT gloves have no insulation, but a waterproof liner.  Below 50F, I'd probably pull out my electric gear and heated gloves.

With any of these gloves, and with the rest of my gear, I frequently spray them with a waterproofing spray.  Fred Meyer sells some that doesn't smell in their camping section for about $8 a can.  It's used for tents, clothing and backpacks.  The point is that even with "waterproof" clothing, if you spray it, you'll keep the water from soaking in like with a sponge.  It won't be as heavy and it'll dry quicker.  Plus, you're restoring some of that waterproofness into the liner.
 

bowman.justin77

Member
Member
Thanks everyone, this is truly great insight and experience. I understand the Golden Unicorn thing, but never thought about snowmobile gloves, make sense. Thanks again, good to know I wasnt the only one disappointed in the lack of truly waterproof gloves.

 

Daboo

Moderator
Staff member
Member
allezm2 said:
...but never thought about snowmobile gloves, make sense. ...
Let me offer one thought about snowmobile gloves and other snow gear for motorcycling...

There's a difference between taking a spill on a snowmobile and taking a spill on a motorcycle.  In one case, you're putting your hands out and hitting snow.  In the other case, you're putting your hands out and hitting asphalt, concrete or even gravel.

The winter when it is cold, is also the riding season when you are most likely to have an accident and use your protective gear.  I read where people ditch the riding gear with it's CE level armor and abrasion resistant outer materials for a snowmobile suit with no padding and thin nylon. 

The gloves are another situation.  How will those snowmobile gloves hold up in a slide?  Because you know the first thing you'll put down in a fall to protect yourself is your hands.

Chris
 

LSGiant

Moderator
Member
Grant said:
As expensive as something so simple as a pair of good gloves are I hate to say it but the only way is to pack multiple pairs and change them out. The biggest irritation I have with gloves is spending $100+ on a pair and the liners turn inside out every time they are removed.
I have a friend that does a lot of winter riding and  Swears by his Klim snowmobile gloves I don't know how dry they keep him but he says they take the heat from the heated grip and distribute it all the way around the hand.
Buy a pair of silk gloves to wear inside your gloves greatly improves getting in and out of wet gloves best wet riding tip I have ever gotten.
 

dcstrng

Member
Member
Daboo said:
How will those snowmobile gloves hold up in a slide?  Because you know the first thing you'll put down in a fall to protect yourself is your hands.

Fair question -- and just for everyone's peace of mind (well, not really), I tested mine in one of those slides...  Deer jumped in my lap about 4 Decembers ago... gloves, leather jacket, ballistic pants and most everything did just fine -- bike and shoulder not s good -- took about 8 months to get it back in shape, but am still using the snowmobile gloves...

+1 on the silk liners... forgot...
 

4bikes

COG#9715 AAD
Member
The silk liners also probably keep your hands from turning black or brown. Wet leather will do that.
 

ghostrider990

Member
Member
LSGiant said:
Buy a pair of silk gloves to wear inside your gloves greatly improves getting in and out of wet gloves best wet riding tip I have ever gotten.

+100 on Silk Liners.  Wool liners are good too.  But silk is a little more temperature flexible, and dries faster.

gr
 

fj12man2860

Member
Member
Still looking for the mythical pair of truly waterproof gloves. Will have to try out the Aerostitch offering. Wore my totally awesome 26 year old Roadcrafter into work today. They make some great stuff!
 

danmcdermott@me.com

Member
Member
I have used Klim goretex motorcycle gloves in torrential rain for hours and they worked as advertised. The gloves with gauntlets that fasten around the outside of the jacket always wick water in to the glove from the jacket, gloves that the jacket fastens over the gauntlet do much better.

When riding in the rain I have not found a way to keep my hands dry when removing the glove at stops. It is always a bear to get the gloves back on with damp hands because they stick on the inside lining. To work around this I wear a thin pair of glove liners that help my hands slip inside the gloves.
 
Top