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Aww Shoot! Shock Shot?

aaronfink3996

Guest
Guest
Hello everybody, first post here. I did what you are never supposed to do and bought a bike with no service records or information on it's history...I mean it looked nice and shiny and ran good.

It's a 2003 C10 with only 11k miles. I bought it as-is from the dealer where I used to work. It's too old for them to keep for their inventory and was going to be sent to auction. I missed having a big inline-4 and I liked my dad's C-10 he owned almost 20 years ago. I'm fairly handy and my dad is a good resource for answering a lot of questions about the bike, but this rear shock has us a bit stumped.

When you compress the suspension, it groans. Shock had no air in it when I bought it, and was quiet. The more air you put in, the more it groans. The rebound adjuster also seems to affect it. It holds air and the damping seems to work as it is supposed to (you can notice the rebound speed change with each of the 4 settings). There does seem to be a little oil residue around the top of the shock.

The oil residue suggests a leak, but as I mentioned, it holds air. I know nothing about how these shocks are built. Is the damping circuit separated from the air chamber? I would assume that this is an emulsion shock, so the oil inside isn't really under pressure which could allow a slow leak. It has to have some oil left in there or else it wouldn't have any damping left to it.

So, my question is if these shocks have any means of user serviceability or something I could lube to quiet this thing down. I don't plan on keeping the bike long term, so I don't have any interest in an upgraded shock. I could take my chances with someone's old take-off shock or one from ebay (likely from a wrecked bike).

Thanks for any advice or information.
 

Stasch

Member
Member
There might be nothing wrong with it at all. I had the same thing and resolved it as follows:

Try removing it and cleaning as described here: Rear Shock Squeak Link

(This is a copy of a page I saved off the forum to my computer back in 2010.)

You can also change the oil in the shock too.

While the shock is removed, inspect and grease the lower shock bearings and linkages and the upper bolt (can't recall if there is a bushing up there too).

Just in case, here's the raw text from t:

Oh, and the links will NOT work.

------------ BEGIN TEXT FROM OLD THREAD -----------
===================================================================================
amigoride

Rear shock squeak..?
« on: August 31, 2010, 08:34:44 am »
Reply with quoteQuote
When bouncing up and down on my '05 there is a very audible "squeak" from the rear shock area. I removed the bolts from the lower pivot points and greased all the dry surfaces. The rear shock has 30 psi in it.
It is hard to determine exactly where the squeak is coming from. Can the rear shock itself be the culprit? Am I missing something obvious here?

I also developed a "backfire" on deceleration on my last ride. It started suddenly with no previous incidents. The bike also started stuttering rolling off idle and lower rpm's. I pulled both pipes and made sure the clamp connections on the exhaust gaskets were in place and tight. My idle is set right at 1100-1200 rpm. The valves were set about 8M miles ago. It's pouring rain this A.M. so I really don't want to take it for a ride until the deluge stops.
Have I missed anything ovious that could contribute to the backfire/stutter issue? (maybe seperate issues?).

===================================================================================

GTR1000

Re: Rear shock squeak..?
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2010, 09:07:19 am »

I can try and help with your shock issue. To prove it's the shock, let all the air out. I bet you $2 the squeak will go away.

This happened on my A5 some years ago. My solution was to drain and re-fill the shock http://web.archive.org/web/20050523210326/www.ldrider.ca/techpages/rearshockoilchange.htm and give the chrome piston under the rubber boot a very good polish. Squirting WD40 around the piston seal also helped.

Also at http://www.cog-online.org/clubportal/clubstatic.cfm?clubID=1328&pubmenuoptID=29927 if first link doesn't work.

===================================================================================
vlad

Re: Rear shock squeak..?
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2010, 09:28:06 am »
Reply with quoteQuote
One of the things that I learned while playing with SISF 2 min mod was that a lean-running bike (too much air going in) would backfire on deceleration and sputter. So, while the gurus here chime in, you might want to check around your air box and carbs for an obvious air leak (cracked air box, loose airbox lid, loose carb boot, cracked vacuum tubing...). HTH
Report to moderator Logged
Vlad

===================================================================================

Summit670

Re: Rear shock squeak..?
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2010, 06:32:06 pm »
Reply with quoteQuote
Ditto on the shock. My 87 was squeaking and I looked everywhere trying to figure it out.

Finally determined it was the shock piston and once I changed the oil and cleaned/lubed the piston with oil, the squeak stopped. Very easy to pull the shock and change the oil.
Report to moderator Logged

===================================================================================

amigoride

Thanks GTR 1000!

I slid the boot away from the shock cylinder and cleaned the piston with a clean soft cloth. Then I wiped some silicone lubricant onto the piston, even sprayed a little upward where it enters the shock. There must be a seal at that point that needed lubricating because the squeak was instantly gone.
I will pull the shock and change the fluid soon. Looks straight forward. Thanks for the tip. You hit it on the head.
Brian

===================================================================================
 
Last edited:

greenie

Member
Member
I've owned three C-10s and never had an issue with the rear shock - never leaked an air or oil. 11K miles is practically new - but a bike sitting unused can cause issues. Careful adding air - I use a low volume hand pump. A compressor can be hard to control since the shock's volume for air is so small. 50psi freighted and 30 psi solo works well for me. As mentioned there are grease fittings you'll need to remove the mufflers to access unless you have a trick grease gun.
 

aaronfink3996

Guest
Guest
There might be nothing wrong with it at all. I had the same thing and resolved it as follows:

Try removing it and cleaning as described here: Rear Shock Squeak Link

(This is a copy of a page I saved off the forum to my computer back in 2010.)

You can also change the oil in the shock too.

While the shock is removed, inspect and grease the lower shock bearings and linkages and the upper bolt (can't recall if there is a bushing up there too).

Just in case, here's the raw text from t:

Oh, and the links will NOT work.

------------ BEGIN TEXT FROM OLD THREAD -----------
===================================================================================
amigoride

Rear shock squeak..?
« on: August 31, 2010, 08:34:44 am »
Reply with quoteQuote
When bouncing up and down on my '05 there is a very audible "squeak" from the rear shock area. I removed the bolts from the lower pivot points and greased all the dry surfaces. The rear shock has 30 psi in it.
It is hard to determine exactly where the squeak is coming from. Can the rear shock itself be the culprit? Am I missing something obvious here?

I also developed a "backfire" on deceleration on my last ride. It started suddenly with no previous incidents. The bike also started stuttering rolling off idle and lower rpm's. I pulled both pipes and made sure the clamp connections on the exhaust gaskets were in place and tight. My idle is set right at 1100-1200 rpm. The valves were set about 8M miles ago. It's pouring rain this A.M. so I really don't want to take it for a ride until the deluge stops.
Have I missed anything ovious that could contribute to the backfire/stutter issue? (maybe seperate issues?).

===================================================================================

GTR1000

Re: Rear shock squeak..?
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2010, 09:07:19 am »

I can try and help with your shock issue. To prove it's the shock, let all the air out. I bet you $2 the squeak will go away.

This happened on my A5 some years ago. My solution was to drain and re-fill the shock http://web.archive.org/web/20050523210326/www.ldrider.ca/techpages/rearshockoilchange.htm and give the chrome piston under the rubber boot a very good polish. Squirting WD40 around the piston seal also helped.

Also at http://www.cog-online.org/clubportal/clubstatic.cfm?clubID=1328&pubmenuoptID=29927 if first link doesn't work.

===================================================================================
vlad

Re: Rear shock squeak..?
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2010, 09:28:06 am »
Reply with quoteQuote
One of the things that I learned while playing with SISF 2 min mod was that a lean-running bike (too much air going in) would backfire on deceleration and sputter. So, while the gurus here chime in, you might want to check around your air box and carbs for an obvious air leak (cracked air box, loose airbox lid, loose carb boot, cracked vacuum tubing...). HTH
Report to moderator Logged
Vlad

===================================================================================

Summit670

Re: Rear shock squeak..?
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2010, 06:32:06 pm »
Reply with quoteQuote
Ditto on the shock. My 87 was squeaking and I looked everywhere trying to figure it out.

Finally determined it was the shock piston and once I changed the oil and cleaned/lubed the piston with oil, the squeak stopped. Very easy to pull the shock and change the oil.
Report to moderator Logged

===================================================================================

amigoride

Thanks GTR 1000!

I slid the boot away from the shock cylinder and cleaned the piston with a clean soft cloth. Then I wiped some silicone lubricant onto the piston, even sprayed a little upward where it enters the shock. There must be a seal at that point that needed lubricating because the squeak was instantly gone.
I will pull the shock and change the fluid soon. Looks straight forward. Thanks for the tip. You hit it on the head.
Brian

===================================================================================
Wow! Awesome info!

Did you ever change the shock oil on yours? I'm wondering what sort of oil might be needed.

Thank you
 

aaronfink3996

Guest
Guest
I've owned three C-10s and never had an issue with the rear shock - never leaked an air or oil. 11K miles is practically new - but a bike sitting unused can cause issues. Careful adding air - I use a low volume hand pump. A compressor can be hard to control since the shock's volume for air is so small. 50psi freighted and 30 psi solo works well for me. As mentioned there are grease fittings you'll need to remove the mufflers to access unless you have a trick grease gun.
I can tell this bike has sat, so that may be my issue. Rear tire is a few years old with no visible wear. I have been using a mountain bike shock pump. It will get to 300 psi on my mountain bike shock...eventually. On the C10 shock, one pump gives under a half pound of pressure.
 

Stasch

Member
Member
Wow! Awesome info!

Did you ever change the shock oil on yours? I'm wondering what sort of oil might be needed.

Yes I did about 55,000 miles ago in 2011

I used the rear shock oil kit from Murph's - not sure of wt. or if Murph's carries the kit anymore.

Other's may chime in on the specs for the oil.

8 oz. came out of shock. Put the kit's 9.5 oz back in. Cleaned up, pledge wax on shaft, no more squeaking, rode better.
 

cragantler

Member
Member
My 2000 is at 67k and haven’t had any shock issues.
I wouldn’t worry too much of not knowing the history of the bike. I got mine with 32k, almost 14 years ago and going strong
 

connie_rider

Member
Member
Aaron, I agree that you should remove the shock/linkage and grease it.

I'm not sure where you are (??), but I have my old shock in the garage.
(I installed a rear shock from a C-14 on my bike)
If you need one, your welcome to it for shipping costs. (and ya owe me a beer someday)
I'm sure that others may be closer to you that also have shocks.

If you want to improve your shock (cheaply), a OEM shock from a ZZR-1200 can be used.
(with a few EZ bushing modifications).

To fill the shock with an air compressor (at home). Use a pressure regulator and air chuck.
Set the regulator to the desired pressure, fill the shock., and quickly remove the chuck from the shock.
The shock cannot overfill as the regulator controls the pressure.
NOTE: Resultant pressure will be approx. 2 psi lower than your regulator setting because of lost air {as you disconnect the air chuck}.
Do NOT use a "screw on" chuck as it will loose to much air as you remove it.

On the grease fittings, remove the old (straight) grease Serts, and install angled grease Serts. {sp??}

To refill the shock with oil, buy a kit from Murph and follow the instructions he provides.

Ride safe, Ted
 

aaronfink3996

Guest
Guest
Aaron, I agree that you should remove the shock/linkage and grease it.

I'm not sure where you are (??), but I have my old shock in the garage.
(I installed a rear shock from a C-14 on my bike)
If you need one, your welcome to it for shipping costs. (and ya owe me a beer someday)
I'm sure that others may be closer to you that also have shocks.

If you want to improve your shock (cheaply), a OEM shock from a ZZR-1200 can be used.
(with a few EZ bushing modifications).

To fill the shock with an air compressor (at home). Use a pressure regulator and air chuck.
Set the regulator to the desired pressure, fill the shock., and quickly remove the chuck from the shock.
The shock cannot overfill as the regulator controls the pressure.
NOTE: Resultant pressure will be approx. 2 psi lower than your regulator setting because of lost air {as you disconnect the air chuck}.
Do NOT use a "screw on" chuck as it will loose to much air as you remove it.

On the grease fittings, remove the old (straight) grease Serts, and install angled grease Serts. {sp??}

To refill the shock with oil, buy a kit from Murph and follow the instructions he provides.

Ride safe, Ted
Hi Ted,

I'm in central Texas. This weekend, I'll dig in to the shock and see what I can do as far as greasing it. Already have shot some grease into the lower zerk fittings and need to get a right angle adapter for my grease gun to get at the upper fittings so I don't have to unbolt the mufflers. Murphs no longer carries the repair kits, so I'll check with them to see what kind of oil they used. Many thanks!
 

connie_rider

Member
Member
I'm going thru Daingerfield Texas (from Houston) at the end of the month for a ride in Arkansas.
Could bring the shock if you don't solve the issue by then and we could possibly meet?
Better yet. Come ride with us. 😜


Ride safe, Ted
 

aaronfink3996

Guest
Guest
I'm going thru Daingerfield Texas (from Houston) at the end of the month for a ride in Arkansas.
Could bring the shock if you don't solve the issue by then and we could possibly meet?
Better yet. Come ride with us. 😜


Ride safe, Ted
Very kind of you, Ted. I ended up cleaning the shock piston and running a home-made fork seal tool under the seal to scrape out any old dirty funky stuff, seems to have done the trick, nice and quiet now. On to the next problem with the bike...leaky bevel drive case gasket. It would appear that older bikes left to sit for a while don't always awake from their slumber in the same shape as when they were put away.
 

connie_rider

Member
Member
Did you disassemble the shock? (Not sure I understand how you cleaned the shock piston?)
I've used a home made fork seal tool on fork seals. never tried it on a shock seal.

On some bevel case gaskets, Kawasaki tried a paper gasket that pushed out and leaked.
(My 03 had that problem when it was new)
I think that the replacement was a metal gasket.

If you get her ready, come ride with us.
Ride safe, Ted
 
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